Black grapes eaten by dog

Colin G

Well-Known Member
Hi all .
We have a 3 year old cockerpoo that has just eaten a small black grape , I know they are toxic to them but has any of your dogs eaten anything like this before and how have you dealt with it .
Any feedback appreciated.
Colin
 
Bad luck. No-one knows what the active toxic ingredient is or what the toxic dose is (tartaric acid is the current favourite). Plenty of dogs eat grapes, fresh and dried without ill effect but some have died and, as a result, most vets are very cautious. If you'd rung me, I'd say come down and I'll make the dog vomit.
 
My lab ate a whole bunch, the lot. Vet gave her medicine, took some of it up. Charcoal liquid to help make her sick. She didn't even have the good grace to pretend she felt unwell. Bloody dustbin..
However, it was explained to us that grapes aren't definitively toxic in all dogs.
 
Thanks guys for the information we’ll base our decision accordingly and hopefully we’ll get right , 🤞
 
My lab ate a whole bunch, the lot. Vet gave her medicine, took some of it up. Charcoal liquid to help make her sick. She didn't even have the good grace to pretend she felt unwell. Bloody dustbin..
However, it was explained to us that grapes aren't definitively toxic in all dogs.
My old ESS used to love grapes and apricots 🙄 before we found out that they can be toxic ! Still lived until 14 yrs.
Colmans mustard powder is good for making a dog sick . Vet told me to do that with another dog that chewed a tub of rooting powder as a pup 🐶
 
Hi all .
We have a 3 year old cockerpoo that has just eaten a small black grape , I know they are toxic to them but has any of your dogs eaten anything like this before and how have you dealt with it .
Any feedback appreciated.
Colin
Personally I would not worry about one grape - have had dogs eat small quantities of them over the years with no ill effects. I used to have a GWP that would raid the kitchen tops occasionally including the fruit bowl. Also had a spaniel that used to pick tomato’s of the vines when growing in the garden- not ideal but never seemed to do any harm.
 
Mine ate one rasin I rang the vet and he wanted her age and weight he came back and said she should be ok but to keep an eye on her.
 
My dad had a newfoundland/ border collie cross ( imagine a black 10 stone collie and you are close) who used to eat peeled grapes as a staple treat most days for years. Lived to 14 years before expiring.
 
I'd be interested to know what you can give a dog to make it sick. My cocker ate a box of 6 mince pies, including the carboard but left the tin foil. That cost £150. Vet said the week before a Doberman had died after eating an unknown quantity of fruit and fibre! After feeding him hundreds of apple cores I was amazed to hear they're evidently toxic too. Don't let them eat peaches - the bugger scavenged one, stone got stuck and that cost £3k.
 
After feeding him hundreds of apple cores I was amazed to hear they're evidently toxic too.
I had to investigate a complaint of apple pip
Poisoning, this was quite a long time ago , but if I remember correctly it was something ridiculous like over 120 apple pips daily over a fair few weeks - it is a very slim chance of a dog dying from eating apple cores.
 
If you monitored what a dog ate and drank whilst out on shoot days you would never take them out shooting again and would be in the vets every Saturday evening. Never mind the lotions and potions that they would need for every cut, graze and thorn prick.
I wouldn't worry about one grape in the slightest.
 
a small black grape
Dude, both my labs have been eating them for years and nowt happened to them. The same with all that venison shot with lead. Still kicking.

Dog eats apple cores by the dozen but spits out the pips.

So called experts are full of ****.
 
I do think the risk is over stated but I think the unpredictability of a dogs reaction to grapes and raisins is the problem. I have been told by 2 separate vet friends that 99 times out of a 100 the dog will be fine but that one dog can react very badly to a single raisin and there is no way to predict the severity of the reaction (renal failure one possible outcome). I have to admit that it has cost my wife a few quid over the years for her mini schnauzers but last time we made the culprit sick and gave it activated charcoal and all was fine.

With chocolate the reaction is apparently predictable depending on the quantity, dogs weight etc. Also milk chocolate there is very little cocoa so the risk is reduced.

I would play safe and try to make the dog sick at the very least.
 
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