Black Powder .44 Revolver

I bought the above from a member on this site. I will not embarrass him but he was in his time a national medal winner with it.
I met him a couple of weeks ago at Bisley for the mutually convenient - social distancing exchange.

He was kind enough to chuck in a variety of bits and bobs - enough to get me started.

I was forced to go into a CV19 controlled Fulton's and purchase some Swiss No.2 (3fg) Black Powder. Yes that's right - Swiss No.2 is size 3.
Happy to sanitise my hands on the way in - ironic really because I always feel like I need a shower after spending money in there.

Any hoo.

Took my new toy to Melville today and spent all morning dicking about for the grand total of twelve shots fired. Have not had so much fun in ages.
For what it is worth, the revolver grouped tightly at about 11 o'clock (why not shoot it earlier I hear the wags ask...).

Now apparently I have to go and source some grease (to prevent chain-fire) and semolina to act as filler.

If you have not had a go with Black Power revolvers may I urge you to give it a bash.

The only buggeration appears to be the cleaning regime. Hot water is good and there are those who recommend the dish-washer but a man would have to foolish to risk incurring the wrath of his wife by sticking a Black Powder Revolver in the dish-washer. I could go on, but I think that I can hear my wife's car pulling up and I have to get a gun some plates out of the wash...
 

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zambezi

Well-Known Member
Lol. I am in the process of securing the required certification to store black powder because I fancy a .44 blackpowder pistol too!

As a kid of about 10 or 11 I used to make gunpowder, ostensibly to fuel tiny paper rockets [which flew every bit as well as bought items]. When not supervised by my Dad, I also made model cannons and fired ball bearings at cans of water. I still have all my fingers, so must have been fairly prudent during that experimentation.

Now retired, I recently watched a fellow shooting club member fill the air with plumes of smoke from his .44 Navy. At the end of that flurry of son et lumière, his target remained largely unimpaired and ready for his next range day.

How different to most of our modern shooting where getting a rifle to cloverleaf at 100m is par for the course? The kid in me awoke afresh and decided that looks like fun! The challenge of getting a ballistically-challenged projectile to strike a distant target galvanised me to start researching.

Now...who has a stainless Ruger .44 they want to flog?
 

Red Dragon 2

Well-Known Member
I always used to load every other cylinder to prevent ring fire, used waxed felt wads over the top of the load in the cylinder as well, a 44 black powder pistol was great for plinking at tin cans, also had the Kentucky style single shot rifle in 44, could hit a coke can at 100 yds almost every time freehand off the shoulder. Both were the Italian replicas pistol Remington style
 

Rewulf

Well-Known Member
Now...who has a stainless Ruger .44 they want to flog?
Got a Pietta 1858 stainless target model ?
Loads of balls, bullets and a brand new box of pyrodex pellets (no explosive licence needed!) all in a mackled up case.
£180
 

Rewulf

Well-Known Member
Now apparently I have to go and source some grease (to prevent chain-fire) and semolina to act as filler.
Never found the grease thing very effective , extra mess and stink, never bothered with filler either.
One guy I knew used goose fat , by the time he emptied the cylinder , his hands were covered in melted grease , not good.
 

Swedish

Well-Known Member
I have always used tallow for my grease. The grease is to soften the fouling not to prevent chain fires.

Chain fires are caused by:

1) Poorly fitting balls (ooo err missus). If your chambers are good and your balls are the correct size then you should swage a tiny ring of lead when you seat the ball.
2) Spilt powder
3) Poorly fitting caps

I don't use semolina (although it's perfectly fine for the job) I use .44 wool wads about 10mm thick. Obviously this is a bit more expensive but if you spend long periods away from home like I used to then it eliminates the issue coming home and finding weevils and maggots crawling around in your shooting gear when you forgot to take the semolina tub out! If you have trouble finding Swiss No.2 then Henry Kranks fine will do, although you're a long way from Pudsey!
 

cjm1066

Well-Known Member
Years ago cleaned an 8 bore muzzle loader in an enamel bath, it was the only tap under which the muzzle would fit. Gun was quickly cleaned.

Old enamel and black powder residue took nearly an hour to clean. Thereafter cleanedn outside with boiling water from a kettle.
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
If you have trouble finding Swiss No.2 then Henry Kranks fine will do, although you're a long way from Pudsey!

Funny you should say that.
I have several tubs of HK's BP. Always made a point of popping in when coming back down from Scotland. I bought them when I was dicking about with a Martini-Henry and a Snider.
I was put off my an "expert" who said of HK's powder:-

"It's only good for quarrying".

I very much suspect that it will now get used in the BPR - I think the Swiss was about £80.
 

Rewulf

Well-Known Member
Old enamel and black powder residue took nearly an hour to clean. Thereafter cleanedn outside with boiling water from a kettle.
Automotive brake cleaner I found was best , its just a fast solvent, and doesnt harm rubber or plastics.
I could never bring myself to use water/dishwashers !
 

Swedish

Well-Known Member
Funny you should say that.
I have several tubs of HK's BP. Always made a point of popping in when coming back down from Scotland. I bought them when I was dicking about with a Martini-Henry and a Snider.
I was put off my an "expert" who said of HK's powder:-

"It's only good for quarrying".

I very much suspect that it will now get used in the BPR - I think the Swiss was about £80.
That's quite a funny quote about the quarrying. In fairness HK BP is not as good as Swiss but it is still good. Just check what you have in as for the rifles you may have been using a courser powder which won't burn quick enough in your revolver.
 

Andyquadra

Well-Known Member
Hot water is good and there are those who recommend the dish-washer but a man would have to foolish to risk incurring the wrath of his wife by sticking a Black Powder Revolver in the dish-washer. I could go on, but I think that I can hear my wife's car pulling up and I have to get a gun some plates out of the wash...
Sticking it in the dishwasher :-| My better other half is the dishwasher! Not sure she'd appreciate a pistol being stuck inside her! :rofl::rofl:
 

sy247

Well-Known Member
I like my .44 great fun. I use lard in tthe chambers and wash it up in the sink with hot water and washing up liquid. Comes out sparkling. It's surprisingly accurate, but not as good as my Westlake Taurus conversion
 

Boona5739

Well-Known Member
I have an Ruger Old Army 44/45 and its so much fun. I use tripple 7 , RWS 1075 caps and conical bullets, shoots like a dream.
I've also had good accuracy with round ball. I cast my own bullets and have been experimenting with powder coating them, getting good results.
The Old Army IMO is the best cap and ball 44/45 cal, the only thing I changed was the grips.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Black powder pistols are a lot of fun , I have a few . I also have a Remington 1858 clone like the OP's , but mine has issue sights . It is a very accurate pistol . I've used over powder waxed felt wads and grease over the bullets to prevent chain fires . The felt wads are a lot less messy .

AB
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
Just out of curiosity (I’ve never shot a BP pistol) what happens if it chain fires?? Does the whole cylinder explode??

That is exactly what I asked yesterday.

No one in our group had ever witnessed it, or ever spoken to anyone who witnessed it, or had a relative who once shook hands with a man who once shook hands with a man who witnessed it...
 
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