Black Powder .44 Revolver

I bought the above from a member on this site. I will not embarrass him but he was in his time a national medal winner with it.
I met him a couple of weeks ago at Bisley for the mutually convenient - social distancing exchange.

He was kind enough to chuck in a variety of bits and bobs - enough to get me started.

I was forced to go into a CV19 controlled Fulton's and purchase some Swiss No.2 (3fg) Black Powder. Yes that's right - Swiss No.2 is size 3.
Happy to sanitise my hands on the way in - ironic really because I always feel like I need a shower after spending money in there.

Any hoo.

Took my new toy to Melville today and spent all morning dicking about for the grand total of twelve shots fired. Have not had so much fun in ages.
For what it is worth, the revolver grouped tightly at about 11 o'clock (why not shoot it earlier I hear the wags ask...).

Now apparently I have to go and source some grease (to prevent chain-fire) and semolina to act as filler.

If you have not had a go with Black Power revolvers may I urge you to give it a bash.

The only buggeration appears to be the cleaning regime. Hot water is good and there are those who recommend the dish-washer but a man would have to foolish to risk incurring the wrath of his wife by sticking a Black Powder Revolver in the dish-washer. I could go on, but I think that I can hear my wife's car pulling up and I have to get a gun some plates out of the wash...
 

Attachments

  • .44 BPR.png
    .44 BPR.png
    444.9 KB · Views: 99

Kalahari

Well-Known Member
That is exactly what I asked yesterday.

No one in our group had ever witnessed it, or ever spoken to anyone who witnessed it, or had a relative who once shook hands with a man who once shook hands with a man who witnessed it...
May not be possible to shake hands with the man who did it? :coat: :coat:

David.
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
I was going to ask "Old Stumpy" about it but was advised against doing so...

Now having seen the above video - today I will be mainly making lube (50% 50% Beeswax)
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
I was going to ask "Old Stumpy" about it but was advised against doing so...

Now having seen the above video - today I will be mainly making lube (50% 50% Beeswax)

The text makes clear that the failure happened whilst using undersized projectiles. I cannot believe that any grease will seal off a chamber better than a shave-fit lead ball.

BTW, what did the group look like on target? :)
 

cjm1066

Well-Known Member
It's if the bottom chamber gets ignited that I suspect things get really interesting, the bullet's exit is obstructed by the frame.
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
The text makes clear that the failure happened whilst using undersized projectiles. I cannot believe that any grease will seal off a chamber better than a shave-fit lead ball.

BTW, what did the group look like on target?

Understood.
I was pleased to see that the balls used yesterday did indeed shave off a wee ring of lead when compressed home.
All the other BP shooters has some form of gunk that they topped off their chambers - ranged from axle grease to some secret family recipe.

The group was (surprisingly) a group. I was given the advice by the seller to "Lolly-pop" the target - align front and rear sights just under the black circle.
The groups (only two strings of six shots) were about the 11 o'clock position so next time I will aim low and right and see where they land up.
 

Boona5739

Well-Known Member
I've seen a chain fire, It was just like two shots fired at the same time. The cylinder didn't explode, but a second chamber went off. The ball from that chamber must of gone down range, but not on the target. The shooter said they did not experience twice the recoil, but stopped as he knew something was up.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
I've seen exactly one chain fire in over 40 years of shooting , it was in an original Rogers and Spencer revolver . It's owner , my boss , had forgotten to grease the cylinder . It fired 3 chambers if I remember correctly . Undersized balls were the cause of it , the chambers were slightly oversized which was a common thing in older manufactured pistols . After , he greased the remaining chambers and carried on . There were a number of reasons why it was standard practice to grease cylinders . During the American civil war and other fights of the period , there wasn't much standardization of projectiles within the military supply chain . From what I've read , the Confederate states had a lot of issues in this regard . Sometimes , under sized projectiles were all that was available , greasing the chambers just helped get around that issue . Another concern was water proofing . These guns were carried at all times and in all weathers , there are a number of places water can get into the chambers of a BP revolver , hence the full flap holsters that were popular at the time . Some might think it's unnecessary to grease the chambers on BP revolvers all the time , but for the few seconds it takes to do it , it's cheap insurance .

AB
 

Jamsie

Well-Known Member
I have a replica Remington new model army revolver in .44 calibre. It was built by Uberti in 1969.
Typical load (for me) is 20 grains of Hodgsons triple 7 FFFG with a lubricated felt pad over it. I use .454 lead balls which always leave a nice shaved ring of lead on seating. I use S&B caps which are slightly squeezed to an oval shape to ensure they stay on and I run some beeswax / olive oil lubricant down the barrel with a brush and patch prior to start of shooting. The gun shoots high but if I do my bit I can put them all into a grapefruit at 25 yards by using a two handed grip from a standing position. Easy to clean afterwards with hot water, a bit of fairy liquid and an old tooth brush. Dry thoroughly then oil before putting away. Great fun!
 
Top