Blaser R8 308 . What grain

blaire

Well-Known Member
#1
I have a R8 Prof arriving soon in 308. First time I have used this calibre and will be looking to pick up some factory ammo soon . What is the optimal grain to use, hunting will be primarily UK deer species . Thanks
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
#2
150gr all day long, you generally won't find many shops stocking much alternative weights as a standard product for factory ammo anyway, it will kill anything in the uk no problem.
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
#4
Mine performs very well on all UK Deer using Sierra 150Gn Spt Pro Hunters or Game Kings but also does very well using 180gn for larger quarry out of England.
Incidentally it also performs quite well with PPU ammo of several different weights including 170Gn Grom.
 
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Chasey

Well-Known Member
#9
Just to add a diferent view, I use 125grain Nosler BT running at 3244 FPS against about 2750fps with the 150 grain. I found the destructive expansion was better with the 125s on head shots. The slower 150s were going through and through but I must stress I have only tried them once and due to the results they got put in the fox round box

FOr heart shot I am sure the slower 150 would be better but not in BT

Running 125g BT with home load at 3244 fps i am gettig about a 3" drop from 100m to 200m which makes it a nice long range round
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
#10
When i live in England i shot homeloads 165grn nosler bt. Shot a lot of deer with that bullet. I now load Norma 165grn Oryx for all my hunting. 150 grn nosier partitions work well. I've never understood why people buy a .308 and then shoot light bullets. If people want to shoot light bullets then get a smaller caliber. Just my opinion.
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
#11
When i live in England i shot homeloads 165grn nosler bt. Shot a lot of deer with that bullet. I now load Norma 165grn Oryx for all my hunting. 150 grn nosier partitions work well. I've never understood why people buy a .308 and then shoot light bullets. If people want to shoot light bullets then get a smaller caliber. Just my opinion.
i have shot 308 for a lot of years and have used both light mono metal (130g TTSX)and heavy lead core bullets. The 308 with light bullets offers a remarkable opportunity to maintain frontal area and velocity with a relatively low sectional density. This generally results in exceptionally rapid energy transfer to the animal which often results in spectacular kills. Not saying that others calibres won't do it, just relating my experiences. Basically it isn't just about bullet weight!
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
#12
When i live in England i shot homeloads 165grn nosler bt. Shot a lot of deer with that bullet. I now load Norma 165grn Oryx for all my hunting. 150 grn nosier partitions work well. I've never understood why people buy a .308 and then shoot light bullets. If people want to shoot light bullets then get a smaller caliber. Just my opinion.

I baught a 308 because I wanted a spare rifel and thaught it would be better to have a spare that has the option of heavier buillets rather than get another 243.

I shoot 75g BTs with my 243 and ocasionaly 100g for heart shots

125g is 25% bigger and the smallest load I use in the 308 and does a great job on head shot Fallow from a high seat

If i went for walk and stalk red stags or boor id use my 308 and a heavier bullett

I hardly if ever use the 308 now i have blodded it and sorted out loads but its nice to know its there Zeroed and ready for the day I drop my 243 loading the car to go stalking
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
#13
i have shot 308 for a lot of years and have used both light mono metal (130g TTSX)and heavy lead core bullets. The 308 with light bullets offers a remarkable opportunity to maintain frontal area and velocity with a relatively low sectional density. This generally results in exceptionally rapid energy transfer to the animal which often results in spectacular kills. Not saying that others calibres won't do it, just relating my experiences. Basically it isn't just about bullet weight!
But the mono metal bullets are bigger than a lead bullet of the same weight. If you had a mono metal 180grn .308 bullet it would stick out the end of the barrel :D. Plus you need good velocity for mono bullets to work well.
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
#14
But the mono metal bullets are bigger than a lead bullet of the same weight. If you had a mono metal 180grn .308 bullet it would stick out the end of the barrel :D. Plus you need good velocity for mono bullets to work well.
Exactly, and because the mono metal exit the animal weighing the same as when they went in you don't need the extra weight. If you compare with a 150g lead bullet that may only weigh 50g on exit it makes sense. To me at least! Lighter bullets also help keep the velocity up which for mono metals is a big advantage.
 
#15
Exactly, and because the mono metal exit the animal weighing the same as when they went in you don't need the extra weight. If you compare with a 150g lead bullet that may only weigh 50g on exit it makes sense. To me at least! Lighter bullets also help keep the velocity up which for mono metals is a big advantage.
...and they shoot flatter and waste less meat.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
#16
Exactly, and because the mono metal exit the animal weighing the same as when they went in you don't need the extra weight. If you compare with a 150g lead bullet that may only weigh 50g on exit it makes sense. To me at least! Lighter bullets also help keep the velocity up which for mono metals is a big advantage.
Modern Bonded lead bullets have good retained weight The 3 Oryx i have retrieved had over 90% retained weight and mushroom at any range. Mono bullets don't have the same preformance once the velocity drops at longer ranges. I've never found to much meat damage with bonded bullets.
 

AlexN

Well-Known Member
#17
150 grain all the way!! I was using Norma 150g BST and shot big pigs and huge red deer stags during the rut in Germany, and every single one of them fell on the spot and did not run.

However, I've now moved over to the Hornady 150 grain Superformance as they fly at 3000fps, I get tighter groups and they are cheaper!!! What's not to like!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

SJC

Well-Known Member
#19
I'm with Alex N on this, although I don't think I have the same shooting portfolio he does. I started with the Norma and they are great but have moved over to the Hornady due to cost (£14.00) a box cheaper and found them to shooter tighter groups. I only have a 20 inch barrel but chronagraphed then at 2872ftps.
 

philip

Well-Known Member
#20
I have a R8 Prof arriving soon in 308. First time I have used this calibre and will be looking to pick up some factory ammo soon . What is the optimal grain to use, hunting will be primarily UK deer species . Thanks
I'm running sako 123 grn SP and Hornady NTX 168 Sp through my blaser, sub 18mm on three shots on both without trying
 

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