Bore snake Vs cleaning rod

Bore snake Vs cleaning rod

  • Bore snake

    Votes: 17 25.8%
  • Cleaning rod

    Votes: 49 74.2%

  • Total voters
    66

takbok

Well-Known Member
I've used all sorts of cleaning products, but I am now a total convert to C2R. No more scrubbing, just a little waiting, and a really thorough result.

C2R is fantastic.

I don't have a need for a boresnake other than occasionally for the shotgun.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
I always use a dry boresnake after firing and de-copper a couple of times a year. I don't see how it could be a problem if it snapped as each half is longer than the barrel so there would always be another end to pull on if it snapped at the join. It would never snap elsewhere unless very worn. I've never seen a genuine one snap anyway and suspect most problems are caused by using the wrong calibre snake!?
I'm still using one which I bought 10 years ago and it gets a lot of use.
MS
 

paul a

New Member
Isn't a bore snake a sophisticated pull through? the army seemed to have little trouble with them I have an unused one in the back of my No:4.
I have had copper brushes unscrew from the rod and sticking in the barrel.
 

Koenig

Well-Known Member
I’ve seen a boresnake snap in an SA80A2 barrel. Even the REME lads couldn’t get what was left of it out.
 

Foxyboy43

Well-Known Member
Hmm. Heaven fore fend but if one does snap just make sure you drive it out from the breech - anyone who has used a cleaning rod will know that once the bronze brush engages the rifling it cannot be pulled back!!
🦊🦊
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Boresnakes make a lot more sense in rifles or shotguns where you can take the barrel off easily, as it facilitates pulling through (upwards) in a straight line.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Boresnakes make a lot more sense in rifles or shotguns where you can take the barrel off easily, as it facilitates pulling through (upwards) in a straight line.
I always have the barrel vertical so the bore snake hangs in a straight line below it so no snagging or friction...and I can manage that with the barrel on the rifle and still not let the snake touch the ground...but probably would be easier done with the barrel off.

The only gun that I have that doesn't allow a straight-line entry is the .410 Mossberg but that one is still almost vertical, I adjust it to make the entry angle as friction free as possible. Which reminds me I had a call out yesterday and put it away without cleaning...

Alan
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Can someone enlighten me what C2R is?
Carbon and copper remover...ammonia free like the Wipe Out products...but I seem to remember in a head to head test, that the Tactical Advantage and Accelerator products of Wipe Out were more effective...

Alan

 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
One I've been reading about this evening and wanted to see if more people had an opinion on this.

Firsty, I've only ever used a bore snake on every rifle I've had, never had any issues and the barrel always looks perfectly clean after a couple of pulls through - I normally apply a few drops of cleaning oil to the first part of the bore snake so as it gets pulled through it gets oiled but then any excess is removed by the rest of it after the brush. Also I have washed them a couple of times, although a bore snake has quite a large surface area compared to a cleaning rag so surely it could be used a fair amount before it became inefficient? Most threads I've read seem to say a bore snake should only be used when you haven't got access to a proper cleaning rod but what difference is there?

Cheers,
Jim
I upgraded to the Hoppes Viper boresnake more expensive but vey well made and it has double the length area of brass brushes. Like you i soak the front end of the snake in Hoppes bore cleaner
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
I upgraded to the Hoppes Viper boresnake more expensive but vey well made and it has double the length area of brass brushes. Like you i soak the front end of the snake in Hoppes bore cleaner
On the .308 I pull the original Hoppes Boresnake through a couple of times to clean and dry any condensation in the bore after it has acclimatised when I come in.

Then I use a Viper version which is heavily loaded with CLP as a final pull through before storing.

Before I shoot I pull the dry snake through to remove any residual oil and anything that was loosened by it.

Alan
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
On the .308 I pull the original Hoppes Boresnake through a couple of times to clean and dry any condensation in the bore after it has acclimatised when I come in.

Then I use a Viper version which is heavily loaded with CLP as a final pull through before storing.

Before I shoot I pull the dry snake through to remove any residual oil and anything that was loosened by it.

Alan
Sounds like an improvement on my standard method which I may adopt as I have two snakes including a Viper for my centre fires
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Used a boresnake for years with no issues on .22, .223, .270, to .308 and 12 bore. The thinner cord is so well-stitched to the mop that I reckon you could tow a small car with it. Never given the thought of it snapping the faintest consideration
 

Daddy The Skunk

Well-Known Member
I use a Bore Snake on the Ruger Ranch rifle, and if needed I will use a rod very carefully from the muzzle. I have one in 12bore for use in the field( haven't done it yet).
 

Marcher

Well-Known Member
You do know that the Copper cleaner will attack the "Brass Brushes" on a bore snake. You can throw away the fouled Patches on a cleaning rod, but would have to wash a bore snake each time you used it ?
 
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