Broken & Healed Leg

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
A muntjac doe from last night, first off she was facing away so I never noticed the odd gate but when she turn sideways it was quite noticeable.
@110 I would be on for a neck shot but with the straight leg the head bobbing was more than normal.

Lots of fat around the womb sack area with a small developing fetus.

Thought the newer stalkers would like a look.

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T.eddie

Well-Known Member
Very interesting to see, that one off the same ground as the other you shared on the intestine thread? Just wondering because of the alladin slippers
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
Used to be associated with damp ground but I’ve seen slippers in roe and munties here from normal grassland habitat .Probably more to do with excess minerals in the feed and lack of wear on stoney ground .
 

T.eddie

Well-Known Member
Used to be associated with damp ground but I’ve seen slippers in roe and munties here from normal grassland habitat .Probably more to do with excess minerals in the feed and lack of wear on stoney ground .
Was wondering if there were a few factors at play that would cause that
Cheers mate
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
I would say her ALD slipper was due to the lack of mobility in the knee joint as it was frozen straight....

Her odd gate was the first thing that I noticed it goes with the old saying. " if it looks wrong, there is a good chance it is"
It is like the when the page you are printing off has no letters as the ink has run out.... :popcorn:
 

T.eddie

Well-Known Member
I would say her ALD slipper was due to the lack of mobility in the knee joint as it was frozen straight....

Her odd gate was the first thing that I noticed it goes with the old saying. " if it looks wrong, there is a good chance it is"
It is like the when the page you are printing off has no letters as the ink has run out.... :popcorn:
Makes sense 🤔
 

Farmer Geddon

Well-Known Member
Slipper feet in cattle is nearly always genetic, front hooves on a muntjac are worn so are usually very sharp, Its a defensive thing, if its on its back then those hooves are absolutely deadly I believe they file them, & trust me they know instinctively where the jugular is. They definitely file their antlers to a 30 degree chisel point, I have a Munt skull & its staggering how sharp they are, they use them to spike an animal that may have them by the back of the neck. Gotta respect those tiny Barbarians, they survive in a world of Tigers, Leopards, & some very good running dogs.
 
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