Buzzard Control

Widespreaddanger

Well-Known Member
#1
After reading a few articles about certain individuals including a game keeper in trouble with the law over birds of prey. I would like to ask others on there view on control of certain raptors for example Buzzards.
I have noticed a huge increase in these birds over the last ten years and a decline in ground game. I know buzzards are not totally to blame as they eat carrion, roadkill etc

You are after all allowed to control Cormorants that had been decimating fish stocks. This is not directed at endangered species only the more common ones.
 
#2
As has been said before on this site you will never gain Public-wide consensus for limited and considered control using the decline of game birds reared for sport as an argument. I don’t think they’ll be a great deal more sympathetic if subjected to the assertion that buzzard proliferation has impacted kestrel numbers in the Lowlands but such certainly is the kind of statistic if proven that would be more useful in making a case for control. Kind of in the way we are now seeing a certain grudging acceptance by wildlife trusts that covides and grey squirrel are responsible for a much reduced songbird population.

K
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#4
I don't care if we're talking buzzards, goshawks, badgers, or the lesser-spotted cheesy sock-beetle.........the countryside is now by and large an artificially-maintained ecosystem across large swathes of the UK. We've created this, so we have a duty to maintain the balance and if numbers of any species justify a cull, then a cull should take place. I know this doesn't tie in with the apparently-popular general view in some circles that we must appease the bunny-huggers at all costs, but tough. The people who oppose the need for control have zero understanding of what basis is used to determine why it should take place, and base their attitudes on emotive anthropomorphic sentimentality rather than balance and practicality
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
#5
I don't care if we're talking buzzards, goshawks, badgers, or the lesser-spotted cheesy sock-beetle.........the countryside is now by and large an artificially-maintained ecosystem across large swathes of the UK. We've created this, so we have a duty to maintain the balance and if numbers of any species justify a cull, then a cull should take place. I know this doesn't tie in with the apparently-popular general view in some circles that we must appease the bunny-huggers at all costs, but tough. The people who oppose the need for control have zero understanding of what basis is used to determine why it should take place, and base their attitudes on emotive anthropomorphic sentimentality rather than balance and practicality
wow, don't go sitting on the fence there!! say what you really feel!
 
#6
I don't care if we're talking buzzards, goshawks, badgers, or the lesser-spotted cheesy sock-beetle.........the countryside is now by and large an artificially-maintained ecosystem across large swathes of the UK. We've created this, so we have a duty to maintain the balance and if numbers of any species justify a cull, then a cull should take place. I know this doesn't tie in with the apparently-popular general view in some circles that we must appease the bunny-huggers at all costs, but tough. The people who oppose the need for control have zero understanding of what basis is used to determine why it should take place, and base their attitudes on emotive anthropomorphic sentimentality rather than balance and practicality
Who's balance?

K
 

vizslamad

Well-Known Member
#7
After reading a few articles about certain individuals including a game keeper in trouble with the law over birds of prey. I would like to ask others on there view on control of certain raptors for example Buzzards.
I have noticed a huge increase in these birds over the last ten years and a decline in ground game. I know buzzards are not totally to blame as they eat carrion, roadkill etc

You are after all allowed to control Cormorants that had been decimating fish stocks. This is not directed at endangered species only the more common ones.
We stock the table for them can you blame any species taking advantage of such an overstocked larder. Personally I think any form of controll will be along time coming due to the relentless persecutions levels of them in the past + people enjoy seeing them.
 

mallettn

Well-Known Member
#11
If you want to do something that might help make a difference to public policy I would advocate joining the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust. In their words they are:

"a leading UK charity conducting conservation science to enhance the British countryside for public benefit. For over 80 years we have been researching and developing game and wildlife management techniques. We use our research to provide training and advice on how best to improve the biodiversity of the countryside.

The beauty is they are an independent science based charity that work to provide the evidence that is needed to convince the powers that be that certain management approaches are required.

I confess to signing up recently and have been enormously impressed by the work they are doing (they provide weekly e-mails with news on current research and initiatives).

I am a long term member of BASC and their support for shooting is great, but that very role means they are less well placed to be influential on the science based discussions on management so you need to join both!
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
#17
Been a member off the GCT for years and are the number 1 conservation charity in the UK by miles.

Doing some really goood work. If ur intrested in predator control/keepering effects look into there studies at Otterburn (think also sailsbury plains) and the work they've done/doing at Allerton.
Theyre anual report cetainly takes some reading too

The really shocking thing to me is it really is not rocket science and to most on here wot they do is just common sense.


Another good conservation charity is Songbird Survival, a far more enlightend outlook compared to rspb
 

basil

Distinguished Member
#18
I don't care if we're talking buzzards, goshawks, badgers, or the lesser-spotted cheesy sock-beetle.........the countryside is now by and large an artificially-maintained ecosystem across large swathes of the UK. We've created this, so we have a duty to maintain the balance and if numbers of any species justify a cull, then a cull should take place. I know this doesn't tie in with the apparently-popular general view in some circles that we must appease the bunny-huggers at all costs, but tough. The people who oppose the need for control have zero understanding of what basis is used to determine why it should take place, and base their attitudes on emotive anthropomorphic sentimentality rather than balance and practicality
I note that you don`t include Deer in your list ...
 

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