Cabinet fixing

noodly

Member
I am planning to add another cabinet this weekend to accommodate my lbp/lbr collection.

This will be the first time I will attempt to mount a cabinet to breeze block as opposed to brick.

Any recommendations as to type of fixings I should use. I don't want it glued to the wall as I may be moving it in the future.

I'm not the most adept diy-er in the world and I do recall splitting a breeze block in the past by using inappropriate fixings/holes!!!

**Mods..... please move this if it's in the wrong section**
 

Bell308

Well-Known Member
I had the same problem with a safe in the loft, I used stainless steel all thread and resin anchors from screw fix item number 14364.

drill through the blocks and into the brick behind (check first)!! then use the resin to fix the all thread into both the brickwork and block.

give the back of the cabinet a good coat of kiwi boot polish or building paper etc. to stop the resin from sticking.

cut the all thread to length to accommodate the nut and large washer inside the cabinet and push the bolts into the resin from inside the cabinet.
hope that helps.
 

shakey jake

Well-Known Member
I always use frame fixings with a torx drive head drill a 6mm hole and drive straight in get the 125mm fixings and washers.
 

noodly

Member
If the cabinet was laid on the floor I'd say yes, but suspect the OP is wanting it upright, as it were.
I may (just to be on the safe side) give the FEO a quick call to clarify. I think laid down would probably suit me better actually.
 

Cumbrian 1

Well-Known Member
As the others have said get some stainless threaded bar and chemical fixings, I wouldn't bother with your FEO just follow their guidelines (I think two wall and two floor or 4 wall fixings and two floor, I can't remember).
 

Eddie P

Well-Known Member
Resin and threaded rod is the easiest option. Drill holes, cut rod to length "glue" in. If your drilling is like mine then put cabinet on wall before gluing in case all the rods are at dodgy angles.
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
I would use stud and resin as well. I've resin fixed to many soft materials including thermalites and chalk cob and it works perfectly if done right. Don't drill the holes too tight. Keep them about of 2 mm larger than the stud so there's plenty of resin around the threads, especially if its a solid wall and the holes are deep, and just enough movement to correct the angle without them drooping. If its a cavity wall use a stop gauge and go gently with the hammer off for the last bit so you don't drill right through into the cavity, otherwise you'll just push all the resin out as you insert the stud. Blow the dust out before applying the resin.

Mark the holes through the cabinet but I would insert the studs first and fit the cabinet over them before the resin has hardened if its light enough to allow that. It sounds awkward but its cleaner and you can get the stud length correct beforehand to avoid cutting inside the cabinet. You need to twist the studs into the resin as if screwing them in to ensure the threads are filled and a lot of resin will be forced out which can be cleaned off before offering up the cabinet, otherwise the surplus will harden and stop the cabinet fitting flush.
Allow several hours before tightening. Are the walls plumb? My FEO doesn't like gaps that a crowbar could be inserted into. I've had to fit a plywood backing board before now with shaped timbers screw along the edge to fill any gaps.
If you move the cabinet later its easy to nip the studs off below the plaster with a disc cutter and fill the holes.
 
Last edited:

Wapinschaw

Well-Known Member
If the principal use of the cabinet is for LBP/LBR then laying it flat across several joists and fixing with coach bolts will provide a more usable space which will be better suited to pistol type firearms. They don't stand upright like a rifle or shotgun, but will lie against the cabinet sides very well. Line the cabinet with some old carpet or floor vinyl to save them from getting knocked about too much. I have had several cabinets installed like this and never had an objection raised.
 

noodly

Member
If the principal use of the cabinet is for LBP/LBR then laying it flat across several joists and fixing with coach bolts will provide a more usable space which will be better suited to pistol type firearms. They don't stand upright like a rifle or shotgun, but will lie against the cabinet sides very well. Line the cabinet with some old carpet or floor vinyl to save them from getting knocked about too much. I have had several cabinets installed like this and never had an objection raised.
if fixing across joists with coach bolts is acceptable then that is definitely my preferred method of installation.

the proposed safe has a very handy handle on the door that will aid opening and closing too :)
 

Top