Can Fallow pressure cause reduced numbers of Roe?

76thirty

Well-Known Member
Got around 600 acres of arable land with plenty of fallow on, seen a few roe and evidence of Roe courtship in the wheat last year, have seen slots/droppings on various fields, farm hasn’t had any sort of deer management for years so the fallow are rampant, been spotted in almost every field and in herds of up to 25 at a time.

It’s now my task to reduce the fallow, was out with a mate on the weekend and we were wondering if the limited roe activity I’ve seen is down to the rampaging fallow? I’d like to see more roe there (although the farmer probably wouldn’t agree) but I’m clueless as to how well fallow and Roe co-habit, am I barking up the wrong tree or given the higher grazing requirements of the fallow are they outcompeting the Roe and thus suppressing them?

It’s ideal ground for both, nice big gently rolling fields that the fallow happily range across but lots of thick hedgerows and small copses that are ideal for the roe, although granted, at this time of year the bloody fallow are taking residence in the hedges!
 

SussexSteve

Well-Known Member
The fallow will soon move off once you start shooting them but wrong time of year now. There is a thread a few weeks ago about the same if you search through. My thoughts are that they don't like hanging about if the numbers are high, especially if the roe are moving into fallow territory. Hit them hard 👍
 

76thirty

Well-Known Member
Yeah, had 3 down recently but obviously leaving them now and will continue to monitor them and see what’s going on/keep an eye out for roe! I’ll have a look for the other post, cheers 👍🏻
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Roe are pretty sedentary animals - it has been said that most does never move more than a few hundred metres from where they are born unless they have to.

Fallow on the other hand will be in a herd and will tend to roam over quite a wide area, especially if disturbed.

So to some extent Fallow’s impact on Roe is transient. Roe’s numbers will much more be a function on area of suitable habitat, quality and quantity of food, numbers of breeding females amd how many are shot and / or killed on the roads.
 

ib1513

Well-Known Member
Son and two mates in high seats shot 27 in a morning. Get some beaters to gently walk them to you and hit hard

My fallow place has almost no Roe on it
S
Yeh, mine too. Only ever seen one young Roe buck passing through.
 

Cows94

Well-Known Member
I'm over run with Fallow on one of our farms. Hardly see Roe here but the valleys to the north & south of us, less than a mile away is full of them. Regular see them grazing the verges but seam to avoid coming on to us
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
I’ve seen a roe buck apparently chasing fallow does ,what for is anyones guess but fallow numbers definitely displace roe or keep them to a minimum .Muntjac however seem to thrive alongside fallow ,at least they do here .
 

Hayduke

Well-Known Member
Caberfeidh, Think he’s talking about fallow, they’re a bit bigger than roe, not quite a red size, well mibee a hungry hill hind vs big ole fallow buck similar,
 

Pete6.5

Well-Known Member
When the fallow numbers around here went up the roe numbers and quality went down but if you hit the fallow hard it's amazing how fast the roe numbers come back. One downside is when the fallow numbers go down the muntjac numbers go up very quickly as well.
 

76thirty

Well-Known Member
When the fallow numbers around here went up the roe numbers and quality went down but if you hit the fallow hard it's amazing how fast the roe numbers come back. One downside is when the fallow numbers go down the muntjac numbers go up very quickly as well.
I’m happy for the toes and munty to climb over high fallow numbers tbh, farmers dad has good numbers of both and has far less damage there than what the fallow do on his!
 

paulbshooting

Well-Known Member
Seen the same here, by focusing on the fallow and there are lots, the quantity and quality of the roe has certainly improved. Also leave anything middle aged unless injured or in poor condition, and focus on yearling cull roe bucks and the occasional old buck.
 
Top