can you bump the shoulder back on loaded ammunition

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
If I remove the spindle and decapping pin / expander ball can you run a loaded cartridge into a die to knock the shoulder back a touch so that the loaded ammo can chamber in a different barrel??
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Will the tip of the bullet not hit the top of the die? And what will it do to neck tension unless you have a removable bushing?
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
mmm - yes thinking about probably not a particularly clever idea. Either dismantle the ammo or shoot it off and start again is the safe and sensible thing to do.
 

jthyttin

Well-Known Member
Theoretically you could, using shoulder bump die or resizing die for larger bullet diameter (like 308 for 7mm-08). Same problem arises as with bushing dies though, the shoulder/neck junction won't be sized all the way.

If you're using regular dies you run into one or more of the following problems, maybe even blow something up.

- get ammo stuck in die
- crush the body of the cartridge
- ruin the neck
- ruin the bullet
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Theoretically you could, using shoulder bump die or resizing die for larger bullet diameter (like 308 for 7mm-08). Same problem arises as with bushing dies though, the shoulder/neck junction won't be sized all the way.

If you're using regular dies you run into one or more of the following problems, maybe even blow something up.

- get ammo stuck in die
- crush the body of the cartridge
- ruin the neck
- ruin the bullet
Quite - thats why I quickly came to the conclusion that it is a bad idea!!
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
As jthyttin says, you could use a body die which only touches the case body and shoulder and will leave enough clearance around the neck even on a loaded round. A standard die, no way ever, even with the expander / decapper stem removed as it will try to size the neck down. Bad idea with a bullet seated!

However, although the body die is technically feasible, it's still a very bad idea. Should anything go wrong (ie BANG!) when the round is fully in the die, it will act as a surrogate rifle chamber allowing enough pressure to build up to be dangerous whilst failing to support the case-head and primer. The result could see action at both ends with a bullet exiting at enough speed to be dangerous in one direction and the primer at the other, also possibly producing a case rupture.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
If I remove the spindle and decapping pin / expander ball can you run a loaded cartridge into a die to knock the shoulder back a touch so that the loaded ammo can chamber in a different barrel??
Was it neck sized brass?~Muir
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Was it neck sized brass?~Muir
Pretty much - I've looked at my technique in detail and I was tending to stop as the lever went firm - at this point the case holder is a few thou from the end of the die. To get a full resize I need to make sure the case holder is actually in firm contact with the bottom of the die. Most of my 7x65R brass has now had 4 or 5 loadings through it is getting a touch hard. Mind you its RWS Brass and that is quite hard from the start - have noticed the difference between Hornady, Federal and RWS brass in my 7x57.

I now have a second barrel in my 7x65R and its chamber appears to be a ball hair shorter. In a bolt action you probably would n't notice but in a break action it wont close. A well fitted break action should not close on a piece of paper - about 3 to 5 thou depending on grade.

Edit - I have just measured it up. On my last batch of reloads the taper to case neck is at 2.181" from the base of the rim. These wont chamber in the top barrel.

I have resized a batch of cases with full length resize (concentrating on my technique and making sure the case holder is in firm contact with the die) and have made up a dummy round - these chamber in the new barrel. taper to case neck is 2.176.
 
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Muir

Well-Known Member
The reason I ask is because I have found that a lot of my interchangeability issues come from the case head area (ahead of the rim where web thins) and not as much from the shoulder. I now FL resize almost everything and small base resize most if die is available and I plan on interchanging cartridges between rifles of like chamberings. Single shots are their own doctrine and I almost always FL resize for those as you described: setting the die at the point where the cases will easily chamber in both rifles.~Muir
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Gents, thank for your thoughts on all this.

I do have a kinetic hammer which I have used in the past to take apart one or two loaded cartridges. I had always found it a faff, particularly sorting the powder from the bullet and case with out having powder going everywhere.

Anyway yesterday I discovered that a kitchen plastic measuring and mixing jug is the tool required. Cartridge into hammer - a few whacks on the old dented and cut bread board, slacken the cartridge holder and the dump all the powder, bullet and case into the jug. And then do the next one. It really doesn't take long to take apart 20 odd cartridges.

Now comes the beauty of the Jug - first pick out the cases and shake out all the powder. Then pick out the bullets. And then because the jug has a pouring spout powder is easily poured back into its tub.

It will only leave a few grains of powder on the surface and the floor - these can be passed off as mouse droppings to the management :)

Then take decapping pin and resize cases. Start to finish - 20 minutes tops.

It wont take long to refill the cases and seat the bullets again.
 

sikadog

Well-Known Member
It works with Lee dies I have just put 20 243wssm through a spare set of dies they were all tight in the chamber but were shooting less than 1/2 inch I ran them complete tried the first one and there were no pressure signs so I shot the next 2 and they shoot the same size group

I am not suggesting that anyone else tries this.
 
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