care of Stock on a wooden rifle

david1976

Well-Known Member
I had my wooden stock rifle out in the snow the other day and, after wiping it down and drying it out in the airing cupboard, the wood has a sort of grey sheen over it.

What is the best stock oil type stuff to get to rub on bring the shine back to it?

I had a look on the net and there are bloody hundreds of different oils, conditioning, polishing, wax etc that all claim to do the job.

Not looking for something that will change the colouring as it has a nice tiger stripe effect just something that will bring the shine back.

Cheers

David
 

bobthedug

Well-Known Member
Hi David,
A couple of years ago I was recommended Stil Crin Wood Oil is comes in a small tin about 6" high with a red cap and a picture of gun stocks on the front.

A guy in the trade gave me a tin which has been ideal. I just dry the stock and give it a quick squish and a wipe over.

The writing on the tin is in italian so I assume I'm doing it right as my stocks still look good!
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
I would say you have a varnish, lacquer or similar that has absorbed water
similar to the water rings you get on a polished coffee table

i would want to remove that grey sheen before applying a coating of anything.
Philips Walnut Oil treatment is very good but there are lots out there
 

Nod-1

Well-Known Member
I had my wooden stock rifle out in the snow the other day and, after wiping it down and drying it out in the airing cupboard, the wood has a sort of grey sheen over it.

What is the best stock oil type stuff to get to rub on bring the shine back to it?

I had a look on the net and there are bloody hundreds of different oils, conditioning, polishing, wax etc that all claim to do the job.

Not looking for something that will change the colouring as it has a nice tiger stripe effect just something that will bring the shine back.

Cheers

David
Napier London gun stock oil is what I have found to be the best stock oil I have used.
 

saddler

Well-Known Member
I would say you have a varnish, lacquer or similar that has absorbed water
similar to the water rings you get on a polished coffee table

i would want to remove that grey sheen before applying a coating of anything.
Philips Walnut Oil treatment is very good but there are lots out there
+1 on the Walnut Oil

I also use linseed oil...tend to switch between the two

I'm a HUGE fan of oiled stocks over the cheap factory varnishes that are used these days. First thing I do with any gun I buy is get rid of the varnish & get the stock oiled correctly.

You are welcome to try some of the oils I have here to see if they make a difference before buying some.
 

High seat

Well-Known Member
I had my wooden stock rifle out in the snow the other day and, after wiping it down and drying it out in the airing cupboard, the wood has a sort of grey sheen over it.

What is the best stock oil type stuff to get to rub on bring the shine back to it?

I had a look on the net and there are bloody hundreds of different oils, conditioning, polishing, wax etc that all claim to do the job.

Not looking for something that will change the colouring as it has a nice tiger stripe effect just something that will bring the shine back.

Cheers

David
Hi David, try boiled linseed oil, cheap in any DIY store. Just rub well in and leave for a while,then buff off with a clean cloth. I am assuming that it is an oil finished stock and not varnished.
 

David T

Well-Known Member
+ 1 on the linseed oil. I tend to apply it, leave it overnight and give the stock a wipe the next day. Works for me.
 

BIG white hunter

Well-Known Member
red oil,callum up at precision rifles,uses this,REALLY brings the wood up lovely,but as said above if it is varnished,it wont take the oil so well,cheers.
 
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paul o'

Well-Known Member
+ 1 linseed oil lots of enfields and outher still going so it must be ok and keeps that water out

+ 1 on the linseed oil. I tend to apply it, leave it overnight and give the stock a wipe the next day. Works for me.
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
+ 1 linseed oil lots of enfields and outher still going so it must be ok and keeps that water out
I seem to remember being told that the linseed oil used for Enfields was raw, rather than boiled, linseed oil. This can be had from artists' suppliers.

The argument in favour of raw is apparently that the so-called 'boiled' is treated at high temperatures, resulting in bigger molecules with less less tendency to soak in the way which is apparently desirable (on Enfields, at least).
 

trouble

Well-Known Member
thats it , artists grade linseed . treat it , let it soak in , treat it again . Remember not to put rags soaked in linseed in your dustbin it can self combust , i was very lucky once
 

The tramp

Well-Known Member
thats it , artists grade linseed . treat it , let it soak in , treat it again . Remember not to put rags soaked in linseed in your dustbin it can self combust , i was very lucky once
Ahh, and I blamed the local kids !!! I'll remember that, thanks.

Pete
 

mark-joppa

Well-Known Member
A trick I was shown from an old french polisher.I had water marks on a mahogany sideboard a teacup ring.

Get some meths and put over the area.This is the tricky part,light it for a few seconds and extinguish by wiping with a cloth .Repeat process if required.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
As already suggested it sounds like the factory finish has absorbed water. If you feel comfortable using varnish stripper allied to a fine scrapper then through to 0000 steel wool I would suggest stripping back to bare wood and start again from there. Once at that point and assuming such things matter you might wish to consider playing with stock colour or even applying fake figure using inks before moving to the final and time-consuming oil finishing process.

I would avoid force drying again in an airing cupboard whatever the finish and remember to apply a SMALL amount of walnut oil with the palm of your hand after every outing.

One last tip would be to check what type of finish has been applied to barrel channel and action as these are areas that would benefit from a truly waterproof sealing treatment if not already subject to such.

Cheers

K
 

PKL

Well-Known Member
I personally would treat a standard T3 hunter stock like the sako hunters, that's with Parker Hale Youngs 303 wiped over on stock and metal work after every outing, keeps it looking new forever.
 

Look deer

Well-Known Member
Ah- lovely smell Youngs 303- takes me back to me dads gun cupboard.

Not so sure about it on a stock though. Too much gun oil can leave a stock dark
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Ahhhh gentlemen , and I use that term lightly :D, the reason they used raw linseed oil on the Enfields was that they had a latge heated vat and the stocked were dunked in for a certain length of time then hung to drain and dry. if one rubs raw linseed onto the surface it will not harden. The boiled stuff has hardening agents added to it..

Also putting a wet stock that is made from Kiln Dried wood into an airing cupboard will likely cause warping. Less likely with proper air dried walnut but still a chance of it happening.

Wipe it down with paper towels then stand in the room to drain off.

The finish on most modern manufacture wood stocks is usually a sprayed ploy finish I believe.
 

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