care of Stock on a wooden rifle

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Carefully remove the stock and place it on Ebay!
Fit composite (or laminate if you prefer the feel of wood) and go stalking, as you now have a rifle that you can actually use in all weathers and not worry about!:thumb:
MS:norty:
There is nothing you need to worry about. You just wipe the rifle down before putting it away, you need to do that whatever you have your barrel bolted on to.
If you like the feel of plastic, then don't be ashamed of it, be proud; there is no need to make up excuses about your guns performance.
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
There is nothing you need to worry about. You just wipe the rifle down before putting it away, you need to do that whatever you have your barrel bolted on to.
If you like the feel of plastic, then don't be ashamed of it, be proud; there is no need to make up excuses about your guns performance.

Fully agree about being proud to be a plastic stock owner.
Be PROUD.
It means you have next to no taste.
The stock you have chosen has no soul and looks exactly like all the others that came out of the mould before it, every one after too.

A little oiling once a month during the winter is so much effort!
I mean who would want to take the time to do that?
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
I can see the logic behind having a synthetic rifle stock, indeed I would have one too; if I was a special operations sniper.
Thankfully I'm not, I don't dress like one either and I certainly don't need a gun that can take being run over by a tank in a puddle of wee wee. I'm a Deer stalker, I take great satisfaction from the beauty that surrounds me in fields and forests and I like my life to be filled with natures beauty, its one of the main reasons that I became a Cabinetmaker when I was 15 years old. My rifle stock is made of Walnut and has never caused me the slightest problem, the wood reflects the use my rifle has had and I'm proud of the patina that I've given to it. When I've been out stalking Deer in all weathers, every morning and evening, for a week or two, and my stock starts to look a bit drab and dull, I sit down by the fire with a lovely drink and give my rifle stock a wipe over with some linseed oil. I think back over the different outings I've had with it and I consider it to be a pleasure to be able to do that, each wee dent or scratch has its own story to tell.
A properly designed and finished wooden stock will not warp or swell causing inaccuracy or inconsistency in the operation of a rifle. I think that opting for a plastic rifle stock in a stalking rifle is a strange thing to do unless you just don't particularly like wood, or even worse still, you actually like plastic.
I use "as-issued" military rifles while walking and target shooting on my land. I've found that the best stuff (IF you have the patience) is raw linseed oil. I apply it twice a day for over a month until it stops soaking in, then let it sit so the stuff hardens at the surface. This completely impregnates the stock and seals it from changes in the weather. It becomes as stable as a composite stock. I did that with my competition rifles when I was an active service rifle competitor. The zero never changed from summer through winter, humid weather or dry.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Fully agree about being proud to be a plastic stock owner.
Be PROUD.
It means you have next to no taste.
The stock you have chosen has no soul and looks exactly like all the others that came out of the mould before it, every one after too.

A little oiling once a month during the winter is so much effort!
I mean who would want to take the time to do that?
It's not a case of being proud, it's what's practical. My rifles are working tools which I maintain to function for a purpose. A quality synthetic stock is a joy to use and will perform meticulously with low maintenance. People used to make tools out of flint and bronze which served a purpose up until a better material came along. My stock might not have 'soul', but it has the experience and tell-tale signs of dozens of unprotected high seat rails, mud and the blood of hundreds of deer. A wooden stock would quite simply not put up with that kind of abuse without serious amounts of maintenance.
There is nothing better to look at than a lovely walnut stock where you can almost look through the surface and into the grain, but they don't stay like that too long on a true working rifle!
MS
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
I can see the logic behind having a synthetic rifle stock, indeed I would have one too; if I was a special operations sniper.
Thankfully I'm not, I don't dress like one either and I certainly don't need a gun that can take being run over by a tank in a puddle of wee wee. I'm a Deer stalker, I take great satisfaction from the beauty that surrounds me in fields and forests and I like my life to be filled with natures beauty, its one of the main reasons that I became a Cabinetmaker when I was 15 years old. My rifle stock is made of Walnut and has never caused me the slightest problem, the wood reflects the use my rifle has had and I'm proud of the patina that I've given to it. When I've been out stalking Deer in all weathers, every morning and evening, for a week or two, and my stock starts to look a bit drab and dull, I sit down by the fire with a lovely drink and give my rifle stock a wipe over with some linseed oil. I think back over the different outings I've had with it and I consider it to be a pleasure to be able to do that, each wee dent or scratch has its own story to tell.
A properly designed and finished wooden stock will not warp or swell causing inaccuracy or inconsistency in the operation of a rifle. I think that opting for a plastic rifle stock in a stalking rifle is a strange thing to do unless you just don't particularly like wood, or even worse still, you actually like plastic.
+1 I could not have said that any better!
Are service personnel not trained to take care of one's fire arm? Does having a plastic stock mean you pay less attention to the up keep of your chosen fire arm?

Having a wooden rifle stock on your rifle does NOT mean you have a less durable fire arm. You still pay the same for a rifle stocked in plastic than you do in wood. It just means you have given more profit to the maker of your pride and joy. IMHO.
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
It's not a case of being proud, it's what's practical. My rifles are working tools which I maintain to function for a purpose. A quality synthetic stock is a joy to use and will perform meticulously with low maintenance. People used to make tools out of flint and bronze which served a purpose up until a better material came along. My stock might not have 'soul', but it has the experience and tell-tale signs of dozens of unprotected high seat rails, mud and the blood of hundreds of deer. A wooden stock would quite simply not put up with that kind of abuse without serious amounts of maintenance. There is nothing better to look at than a lovely walnut stock where you can almost look through the surface and into the grain, but they don't stay like that too long on a true working rifle! MS
My rifles are too working tools. Used on average 3-5 times a week. They get coverd plenty in the mud and blood most others do. As we proved last weekeat the fair there are plenty of other woods that could be used in stock making. Most people have never had a choice in what wood their rifle is stocked in. Until now! I would define any oe to say that roparla lace wood will not be durable enogh. But each to thier own :stir:
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
My rifles are too working tools. Used on average 3-5 times a week. They get coverd plenty in the mud and blood most others do. As we proved last weekeat the fair there are plenty of other woods that could be used in stock making. Most people have never had a choice in what wood their rifle is stocked in. Until now! I would define any oe to say that roparla lace wood will not be durable enogh. But each to thier own :stir:
All woods can absorb moisture and therefore change in size and shape which is not a desireable feature towards accuracy! They can also split, crack and be subject to insect attack. Only high maintenance will prevent this from happening. Synthetic stocks are therefore likely to improve accuracy over wooden ones!:stir:
MS:D
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
All woods can absorb moisture and therefore change in size and shape which is not a desireable feature towards accuracy! They can also split, crack and be subject to insect attack. Only high maintenance will prevent this from happening. Synthetic stocks are therefore likely to improve accuracy over wooden ones!:stir:
MS:D
Humm let me think about that statement!

:rofl: The debate will last for many years I think. And if both types of stocks are looked after they will still be here to see it but we won't.

My stock will still look nice and feel nice. And inspire confidence in my son who will be proud that he inherited a rifle that not only was the instrument that culled many deer. But was also a tool that was used by a marksman that new how to look after his fire arm. And not let it be attacked by insects, aliens and the boogy man. :stir:

Keep believing in the idea that a synthetic stock won't change it's geometry when it sits in the sun. That's called marketing. It what's cleaver people use to convince you that there cheap injection moulding that they created to save them money and make them more profit is ok to use.

Oh and before the inevitable "but the army uses plastic stock parts" comes up.
it is true they do. Do you think it is because of some mystical accuracy adding properties they add? Or more that it costs next to nothing to produce and so enables the ministry to buy better body armour for the Boys!

Plus most of the enfileds I have seen fired at bisley have still been accurate. At least accurate to do the job with which they were made to do. What were they stocked in? Oh yes wood. beech to be exact.

The best rifle I seen of late was a nice example of a lee Metford. The owner could put five shots into a 1 1/2" group! Perfectly capable in culling a deer. Have a guess what he stock was made of?

By the way I am having a good chuckle while writing this post. It is just a bit of pi$$ taking and not somthing you should get upset over, as most do on this lovely forum of like minded people. you shoot what ever you are happy to shoot with.:D
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Humm let me think about that statement!

:rofl: The debate will last for many years I think. And if both types of stocks are looked after they will still be here to see it but we won't.

My stock will still look nice and feel nice. And inspire confidence in my son who will be proud that he inherited a rifle that not only was the instrument that culled many deer. But was also a tool that was used by a marksman that new how to look after his fire arm. And not let it be attacked by insects, aliens and the boogy man. :stir:

Keep believing in the idea that a synthetic stock won't change it's geometry when it sits in the sun. That's called marketing. It what's cleaver people use to convince you that there cheap injection moulding that they created to save them money and make them more profit is ok to use.

Oh and before the inevitable "but the army uses plastic stock parts" comes up.
it is true they do. Do you think it is because of some mystical accuracy adding properties they add? Or more that it costs next to nothing to produce and so enables the ministry to buy better body armour for the Boys!

Plus most of the enfileds I have seen fired at bisley have still been accurate. At least accurate to do the job with which they were made to do. What were they stocked in? Oh yes wood. beech to be exact.

The best rifle I seen of late was a nice example of a lee Metford. The owner could put five shots into a 1 1/2" group! Perfectly capable in culling a deer. Have a guess what he stock was made of?

By the way I am having a good chuckle while writing this post. It is just a bit of pi$$ taking and not somthing you should get upset over, as most do on this lovely forum of like minded people. you shoot what ever you are happy to shoot with.:D
:rofl:If I had a pound for every time I'd been stalking in the sun this year, I'd have about £1.67! My stock has a lovely rubber palm swell and another has a warm and cosy neoprene cover for those cold and frosty mornings laid in the mud waiting for that perfect shot!
My first 7.62mm SLR when I joined the Army had a wooden stock and a plastic forend?:cuckoo:
My LMG was all wood.
I expect some little Indian fella is running around with them now?
They used to make wooden boats to you know? Most have now sunk!:lol:
I'm having a good chuckle too!:D
MS
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
:rofl:If I had a pound for every time I'd been stalking in the sun this year, I'd have about £1.67! My stock has a lovely rubber palm swell and another has a warm and cosy neoprene cover for those cold and frosty mornings laid in the mud waiting for that perfect shot!
My first 7.62mm SLR when I joined the Army had a wooden stock and a plastic forend?:cuckoo:
My LMG was all wood.
I expect some little Indian fella is running around with them now?
They used to make wooden boats to you know? Most have now sunk!:lol:
I'm having a good chuckle too!:D
MS
You don't do much stalking then? No summer roe bucks?
Victory by the way is still considered to be active service. And is maintained so. Do Iron ships sink? Yes Much much quicker. I would rather be on a wooden ship than a plastic one. Wood if smashed still Floats.

Good old SLR what a great rifle! Heavy as hell but accurate and in a proper caliber too. Do you think the plastic forfend made it so much more accurate:cuckoo:

Good evening to you good sir. Thanks for the chuckle! :D
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
"There is nothing better to look at than a lovely walnut stock where you can almost look through the surface and into the grain, but they don't stay like that too long on a true working rifle!"
Monkey Spanker"

Let me assure you Monkey Spanker, if you like the beauty of a wooden stock then you can have a working rifle with a wooden stock. A wooden stocked rifle will stay in perfect working order and become even more attractive with use as a "true working rifle". I use my rifles several times a week in all weathers and they all look very nice, function perfectly, and are a joy to use. Where you say:

"My stock might not have 'soul', but it has the experience and tell-tale signs of dozens of unprotected high seat rails, mud and the blood of hundreds of deer."

I must say that I find this a little concerning, don't you clean your rifle ? It sounds like a deadly bacterial mess that I wouldn't want to hold. Seriously you should clean your rifle my friend, its basic hygiene; if nothing else.
I clean my stock with a 5 to 10 second wipe down with some of the turps meths and oil mixture that I described earlier whenever its been coated in mud or blood, that's why it stays looking so good and has a very hard wearing constitution.
You don't seem to have read the posts on this thread very thoroughly, try reading Clunker's post which I quoted in my last post and it will save you from your confusion.
Don't get me wrong, if you like the feel, function, and look of your piece of plastic then that's great, what are you so concerned about ? If however, as you say, you do love the pleasure a wooden stock can offer then buy or make yourself one, treat it properly with linseed oil as I described, and enjoy being happy and human, relax my friend, all is ok. It certainly doesn't involve any great maintenance and will give you a lifetime of good service.

Kind regards, Olaf
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
"My stock might not have 'soul', but it has the experience and tell-tale signs of dozens of unprotected high seat rails, mud and the blood of hundreds of deer."

I must say that I find this a little concerning, don't you clean your rifle ? It sounds like a deadly bacterial mess that I wouldn't want to hold. Seriously you should clean your rifle my friend, its basic hygiene; if nothing else.
I clean my stock with a 5 to 10 second wipe down with some of the turps meths and oil mixture that I described earlier whenever its been coated in mud or blood, that's why it stays looking so good and has a very hard wearing constitution.
Kind regards, Olaf
Of course I clean any mud and blood off, usually with a quick wipe with some kitchen roll and some anti-bac food safe spray if required, but that is about as far as it goes! I pull it through with a dry bore snake if it has been fired. Working parts stay very lightly oiled and optics kept spotless. Other than that, a de-copper every 100 rounds or so. The rifle is fully coated and stainless. It can quite happily stand in the corner and drip dry with no ill effects and be ready for use with no maint required.
If anything, your mixture of chemicals on wood are more of a concern regarding food hygiene, much the same as wooden handled knives are frowned upon! Apart from the hygiene side, it will do little for your concealment if you venture into the wood with a shiny stock smelling like a gunsmiths workshop! Each to their own though eh?
Regards,
MS:tiphat:
 

Mr Lewis

Well-Known Member
"There is nothing better to look at than a lovely walnut stock where you can almost look through the surface and into the grain, but they don't stay like that too long on a true working rifle!"
Monkey Spanker"

Let me assure you Monkey Spanker, if you like the beauty of a wooden stock then you can have a working rifle with a wooden stock. A wooden stocked rifle will stay in perfect working order and become even more attractive with use as a "true working rifle". I use my rifles several times a week in all weathers and they all look very nice, function perfectly, and are a joy to use. Where you say:

"My stock might not have 'soul', but it has the experience and tell-tale signs of dozens of unprotected high seat rails, mud and the blood of hundreds of deer."

I must say that I find this a little concerning, don't you clean your rifle ? It sounds like a deadly bacterial mess that I wouldn't want to hold. Seriously you should clean your rifle my friend, its basic hygiene; if nothing else.
I clean my stock with a 5 to 10 second wipe down with some of the turps meths and oil mixture that I described earlier whenever its been coated in mud or blood, that's why it stays looking so good and has a very hard wearing constitution.
You don't seem to have read the posts on this thread very thoroughly, try reading Clunker's post which I quoted in my last post and it will save you from your confusion.
Don't get me wrong, if you like the feel, function, and look of your piece of plastic then that's great, what are you so concerned about ? If however, as you say, you do love the pleasure a wooden stock can offer then buy or make yourself one, treat it properly with linseed oil as I described, and enjoy being happy and human, relax my friend, all is ok. It certainly doesn't involve any great maintenance and will give you a lifetime of good service.

Kind regards, Olaf
Well the last time we both sat out in the poring rain and snow sleet fog I had gralloched half a dozen deer and had a pint and was watching my rifle drip dry whist you were still drying and cleaning yours.;) :stir:
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Well the last time we both sat out in the poring rain and snow sleet fog I had gralloched half a dozen deer and had a pint and was watching my rifle drip dry whist you were still drying and cleaning yours.;) :stir:
Hi how are things mate ? Were you over at Gap this weekend ?
In my defence I have to tell you that I never actually cleaned it though, I think that you may have confused me with another chap as I just gave it a wipe down and left it to drip and air dry much the same as you did, that's all I've ever done. I don't think that I've ever cleaned my rifle anywhere other than at home.
When I got home I left it to air a little in a warm room and gave the stock a lick of oil because I always do that and then put it in the safe.
By the way, I went to a talk on Fallow deer the other day done by a lovely woman from Nottingham University and you featured in some of the pictures that she took at an awareness day for school kids. All I can say is great work mate, well done !
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Well the last time we both sat out in the poring rain and snow sleet fog I had gralloched half a dozen deer and had a pint and was watching my rifle drip dry whist you were still drying and cleaning yours.;) :stir:
Hi how are things mate ? Were you over at Gap this weekend ?
In my defence I have to tell you that I never actually cleaned it though, I think that you may have confused me with another chap as I just gave it a wipe down and left it to drip and air dry much the same as you did, that's all I've ever done. I don't think that I've ever cleaned my rifle anywhere other than at home.
When I got home I left it to air a little in a warm room and gave the stock a lick of oil because I always do that and then put it in the safe.
By the way, I went to a talk on Fallow deer the other day done by a lovely woman from Nottingham University and you featured in some of the pictures that she took at an awareness day for school kids. All I can say is great work mate, well done !
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Of course I clean any mud and blood off, usually with a quick wipe with some kitchen roll and some anti-bac food safe spray if required, but that is about as far as it goes! I pull it through with a dry bore snake if it has been fired. Working parts stay very lightly oiled and optics kept spotless. Other than that, a de-copper every 100 rounds or so. The rifle is fully coated and stainless. It can quite happily stand in the corner and drip dry with no ill effects and be ready for use with no maint required.
If anything, your mixture of chemicals on wood are more of a concern regarding food hygiene, much the same as wooden handled knives are frowned upon! Apart from the hygiene side, it will do little for your concealment if you venture into the wood with a shiny stock smelling like a gunsmiths workshop! Each to their own though eh?
Regards,
MS:tiphat:
That's ok ok then isn't it. I thought you said that your rifle was marked with the blood of hundreds of deer though ?
Anyway, I wipe any oil off my stock when I go out. I shoot plenty of deer with it too mate and so I don't seem to have any problems with that smell that you talk about. As for the hands I tend to use food safe gloves whenever I handle the meat, that's basic hygiene too.
Please don't misunderstand me though, I totally respect your choice of rifle stock, its personal preference.
Kindest regards, Olaf
 

Mr Lewis

Well-Known Member
Not I didn't make it to GAP work got in the way!

I am glad that you enjoyed Naomi's talk considering she is a veggi she makes a very good case for the management of deer.

We have worked together a few times on awareness days in schools and have recently been working together on a project with the National Trust.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Not I didn't make it to GAP work got in the way!

I am glad that you enjoyed Naomi's talk considering she is a veggi she makes a very good case for the management of deer.

We have worked together a few times on awareness days in schools and have recently been working together on a project with the National Trust.
Ah, I'm sorry to hear that, I couldn't get over there either as I had already made other plans for the weekend. In a way its good though because I'd been out 10 times last week in the run up to the end of the Fallow Does and as such I'm sill only just recovering from all the effort.
With regards to the vegetarianism I have to say that I think any well informed vegetarian can do nothing other than support the good management of wildlife and indeed its consumption. Its good to hear that Naomi is in such a well placed position to talk some good sense into people especially as she's a Vegetarian, good on you for choosing to invest your time working with her.
My Girlfriend and many of her friends are Vegetarian, both she and her friends always encourage my Deer stalking etc since I explained to them the basic principles behind ecosystems and how we fit in with the Deer and other animals. Several of them have said that when they are pregnant they will eat Game such as venison as they can see that its the most ethical meat they can eat.
Anyway, good to hear from you and I'll look forwards to chatting with you more next time I see you.
Kind regards, Olaf
 

Simjim33

Well-Known Member
Ever used tung oil and white spirit Olaf?
For the show we sanded some sapilei,beech,tulip,maple,walnut and cherry. Half of the side that was showing was given one coat of tung oil(neat). We did that just to show how the grain comes up. The result was almost instant. If we would have bad a constant temp in the hall it would have been even better. We also coated some unsanded zebrano and ropala lace wood. Just so people could see the potential of how the grain comes alive. It is fair to sa my order to the supplier has greatly increased for April. I just hope he gets the zebrano in 3" quarter sawn. We didn't even have to sell the zebrano to be honest, we just let people look at it. I would like to see the conditions were the ropala lacewood or zebrano would warp!
 

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