Central Scotland - Where would you live?

studley

Member
Hi all,

I am looking at potentially relocating and could do with some help with my research.

If you had to pick a spot to live in Central Scotland, say within 50 mins commute of Stirling that would maximise your stalking/shooting/fishing opportunities, where would you pick and why?

My experience of Scotland is mostly the Borders and West Coast so I'd also be interested to hear about recommended towns/villages, fishing clubs, good pubs, etc

Thanks in advance!
 

JockStalk

Well-Known Member
City? Edinburgh. Or Stirling.
Country? Callander and points around there.
Do remember that you will be entering the ‘twighlight zone’ where lighter waving sycophants sing ‘we love Nicola’ no matter how far down the pan the country is.
(keep a bolt hole in England if you can....)
 

NullMac

Well-Known Member
Perth. If that's your definition of central Scotland.

Tay for fishing.

A9 leads to all sorts of stalking. Fallow around Dunkeld, Blair Atholl. Red Blair Atholl up. Roe all around.

Plenty bird shooting round and about. Murthly, Dunkeld, Auchterarder, etc etc

Kinross if you need to be nearer Edinburgh but get the benefit of the Perth area. Only 20 minutes further south.

Rains less than the West !
 

mealiejimmy

Well-Known Member
Perth.
Good links to Stirling by train or motorway
Plenty of all sorts of shooting and fishing within easy reach.
House prices not cheap, but not crazy
A big enough city to have all the day to day amenities, but not feel crowded.

Cheers

Bruce
 

Scandially

Well-Known Member
Stirling and it's surrounding (non ex mining) villages are spot on. Dunblane, Bridge of Allan, Cambusbarron, Gargunnock, Kippen, Thornhill, Doune (No pub), Fintry. I have over a dozen grounds and am turning them down monthly.
 

bobthedug

Well-Known Member
When I was looking at moving to a rural location about 20 years ago, I had a theory.
If the village was traditionally a mi ing village, you really had to do your homework whereas if it was traditionally agricultural, chances are it was not so much of a gamble with the natives.
 

opticron1

Well-Known Member
Having moved around a fair bit during my time on this planet, I've always found it a good idea to rent somewhere when moving to a new area before jumping in and buying a place. I've seen too many people look at snazzy Estate Agent drivel and sign on the dotted line after one or two viewings and regret it due to "unforseen" problems. If you rent somewhere, it gives you time to get a feel for a place and more importantly, find out the places to avoid. Yes it might cost a wee bit more, but if you're going to live somewhere for ten or twenty years, you don't want to jump in with both feet.....
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
Having moved around a fair bit during my time on this planet, I've always found it a good idea to rent somewhere when moving to a new area before jumping in and buying a place. I've seen too many people look at snazzy Estate Agent drivel and sign on the dotted line after one or two viewings and regret it due to "unforseen" problems. If you rent somewhere, it gives you time to get a feel for a place and more importantly, find out the places to avoid. Yes it might cost a wee bit more, but if you're going to live somewhere for ten or twenty years, you don't want to jump in with both feet.....
Have a friend who bought a nice house in an area he didn't know because it was convenient for his work. OMG, what a mistaker to maker. Turns out that it's a dive of an area. Drugs everywhere and a high percentage of the working age people in the area don't! He hadn't realised that the house he bought had been up for sale for years and he can't sell it himself. Obviously he's hoping that another mug will come along one day and get him out of this mess but he's probably going to have to take a massive hit to sell it!
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
Having moved around a fair bit during my time on this planet, I've always found it a good idea to rent somewhere when moving to a new area before jumping in and buying a place. I've seen too many people look at snazzy Estate Agent drivel and sign on the dotted line after one or two viewings and regret it due to "unforseen" problems. If you rent somewhere, it gives you time to get a feel for a place and more importantly, find out the places to avoid. Yes it might cost a wee bit more, but if you're going to live somewhere for ten or twenty years, you don't want to jump in with both feet.....
That's exactly what I'm doing. Sold my house on Friday and want to move to the Scottish borders or maybe Aberdeenshire. In a way the Covid housing market bubble has been a good thing because otherwise I might have just dived in and bought something because it was a bargain. Only trouble is, finding something to rent is far from easy at the moment. Everything goes as soon as it's advertised. Probably have been easier in the spring when a few of the London Covid refugees have turned tail and fled back to the smoke after having a taste of -20 degrees and 17 hours of darkness

Google earth is handy too. I've found some horrors by going 3D on the satellite view and taking a virtual tour with the camera car.
Saw a lovely little place a few weeks ago just north of Pitlochry. traditional stone house, fantastic walk-in condition, loads of space, nice garden and really cheap. Go to Google earth and zoom out and there's the A9 outside the front gate and a railway line the other side of the back garden. Reach over the hedge and you could probably touch the trains. And I assume that's the main line to Inverness so there'll be night trains clattering past. Oddly enough, none of that showed up on the estate agent's pictures. In the days before Goggle I could have wasted a lot of diesel going to view that one.
 
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