Change of zero at 200 yds

2428 miles

Well-Known Member
#1
Following on from novices thread about change of zero when removing mods, I have often wandered this myself but I have to say I have not had any problems with mine so far, touch wood!

However, the other weekend I stayed with a friend in the borders and took a very nice roe buck my first of the season. Trying to get photos off the phone!! Was a lovely weekend.

Anyway,

In the morning we zeroed our rifles and mine was bang on, sub moa at 100 yards with factory ammo.

We then thought why not have a crack at 200 yards seeing as we were there! His rifle shot like a beauty and my shots grouped nicely, dropped 2 inches as expected but off to the left by 3 inches. No wind, lovely sunny morning on level ground.
My set up is A10 Stealth mod on Sako 75 Varmint .243 wooden stock. Factory Remington Accutip 95 grn.

Any ideas?

Thanks
Miles
 

Nick Gordon

Well-Known Member
#2
Morning, Miles

I don't know if this will help but I found that the three rifles I have owned would all zero properly at a set range but when I tried to shoot beyond I found the bullets would strike to the right if I shot much beyond the distance I'd zeroed the rifle.

I couldnt work it out till I tried dry firing with a snap cap and discovered that when I squeezed the trigger I was moving the point of aim a fraction to the right.

My advice is set up the rifle using a solid rest and dry fire at say 50 metres to see if you are pushing/ pulling when you squeeze the trigger.

I hope you sort it out - Until I sorted the problem out, I passed on shooting a few good bucks when I wasnt confident of shooting beyond a certian range.

Nick
 

swampy

Account Suspended
#3
good words from nick

I think nick is probably right on this. I shoot my .22 a lot for practise. it might also be something like a bit of crap between your barrel and the stock.

I recently did some work with a novice with his shooting and with correct breathing and trigger pull and follow through he was able to really tighten up his shooting.

Do a bit of dry firing with snap caps and also some .22 practise. work hard on your trigger pull and see where you go from there.

All the best

steve
 

2428 miles

Well-Known Member
#4
Thanks for the advice gentleman,

whilst i agree this is a something one can never practice enough and is the best way of reducing ones grouping and improving consistency, on this occasion I’m not sure it's the problem.

I don't want to be the bad workman that blames his tools but I’m happy with the grouping at that distance (200 yds) considering I’m using factory ammo. I thought 2.5 inches was not bad.

Since Jan i have taken 6 or so 200 yard shots and they have all been perfect clean kills.

Not sure why its happened now.
I’m sure your right though, it probably is down to human error.

Thanks

Miles
 

2428 miles

Well-Known Member
#6
300wsm,

Thank you for your post, of course I won’t take offence!! It is great to get peoples opinions and I’m very great full to you all fro taking the time to post.

Having looked at the Beaufort scale, there could have been a number 1 (light air) going on but I hadn’t really thought it would make any difference. More fool me!!

It’s very interesting and another factor to think about when taking a shot. I will continue my reading on the subject!!

Thanks again

Miles
 

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