Clean or not to clean

Conh

Well-Known Member
Yes! if you dont your going to do far more chamber cleaning ! brass expands to be a tight fit in the chamber on firing then relaxes , leaving crud behind .
Do i need to point out that chambers need cleaning on a rifle even when you dont introduce more crud ?

Only looking for MOA ? well MOA is 1/60th of a single degree , so yeah everything matters accuraccy wise . Thats before we think of the crud in your chamber holding moisture and rusting
I’m sorry but I can’t agree with your comments. Look up what Erik cortina has to say on the subject.
 

Bowland blades

Well-Known Member
I’m sorry but I can’t agree with your comments. Look up what Erik cortina has to say on the subject.
i think you need to quote that which you are talking about because he has made a lot of writing about stuff , some of it good some not so good over the years . You dont state what you actually disagree with anyhow
 

Cooter

Well-Known Member
The main advantage I found with cleaning the brass is that it is easier to see cracks/splits in the case.

I used to clean the cases (and everything else) more when I was using Varget, as the cases,chamber and barrel were always full of soot.
With the modern Vhit powders, which tend to contain detergent/cleaners, I don't see the problem any more, so there is a choice is to just check/clean the inside of the neck and the primer pocket in order to keep the crud out of the sizing dies.
 

ChesterP

Well-Known Member
People are pretty entrenched in what they choose to do themselves, and you'll never convince some to clean or not to clean. It's a personal thing. I treat a rifle as I would any other tool that I value, and for reasons of reliability and consistency, the chamber, barrel and the bolt are cleaned after every outing. It takes a few minutes. A surprising amount of crud and carbon can build up in the chamber over time if not cleaned and that's not a good thing.
 
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