Clean your mod!

Tom D

Well-Known Member
I went out the other day to test some ammo, shots were all over the place, I suspected only the scope could be at fault. Tried again today with another scope, it was just the same 2" group at 40 yards.. On closer inspection I found a nick in the crown, I couldn't figure out how it had happened, I have never dropped the gun and I put the mod on when it leaves the cabinet and take it off when I get home so I knew it hadn't happened in the field. I spoke to the smith who made it today and he said that it's not uncommon for a wee bit of crap from the mod to fall into the barrel, (flake of rust or bit of carbon) only to get shot out on the next shot. Looking closely at the damage it looks just like it has been broken off from the inside out rather than dinged in... Mod will be going in the ultrasonic cleaner before it sees action again, and the rifle will be going to get re-crowned. Lesson learned....:doh:
 

Shropshire Dan

Well-Known Member
I had a similar problem with the .22-250 I went to see Mike norris and he quickly recrowned it for me and now it's spot on again. Mine was the dodgy threading job by the chap I sold it to and then regretted it and bought it back.
 

Mr. Gain

Well-Known Member
I had the pleasure of watching Mike do a threading job a few months ago, and if any other 'smith does it better I'd be very surprised indeed.
 

Slurpy Sam

Active Member
I had exactly the same with my sake finnlight in 243, my own fault thou I left the mod on had it really crowned and it will shot half inch 3 shot groups with ease at 100 yards with homelands of 85 grain spitzers with 41 grains of variety behind it. Fast and flat.
 

Bell308

Well-Known Member
just be careful what you put in the ultrasonic bath as a cleaner,, some of the products sold commonly will strip the finish off some mods.

I use water only and it works ok.. followed by a spell in the oven / airing cupboard to dry the bits, its not much of a problem on my predator 12 as it strips easily to sub-assemblies.
 

Tartan_Terrier

Well-Known Member
just be careful what you put in the ultrasonic bath as a cleaner,, some of the products sold commonly will strip the finish off some mods.

I use water only and it works ok.. followed by a spell in the oven / airing cupboard to dry the bits, its not much of a problem on my predator 12 as it strips easily to sub-assemblies.
Do you use demineralised water? Just wondering about limescale in the mod after it dries.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
I was told to give mine a good blast out with WD40 (is there anything it cant do, thats what I want to know haha) and then wrap it in tissue standing on its end for a bit for all the gubbins to drain out.

Then it can go back in the cabinet once most of the WD has drained out.

The only thing when doing this apparently is to only WD it when you wont be using it again for a few days to give the solution a chance to evaporate. If you WD it one evening and are then out again the next morning you will get a big plume of white smoke on your first shot! And also make sure you only do this with WD40 and not with any other oil - WD works because it is very thin and will evaporate over time, other oils wont and will build up a residue inside the mod.
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
I was told to give mine a good blast out with WD40 (is there anything it cant do, thats what I want to know haha)
What it can't do is better all other specialist lubricants, penetrating oils, corrosion inhibitors, electrical contact cleaners, etc., etc., that were not designed as simple water dispersants. :D

And also make sure you only do this with WD40 and not with any other oil - WD works because it is very thin and will evaporate over time, other oils wont and will build up a residue inside the mod.
:eek: Try this for a laugh. Spray a quantity of WD40 into a glass and put it onto a shelf until the aerosol propellant evaporates. The gunky, dirt and dust attracting residue that remains wouldn't be my first choice of 'lubricant' to get anywhere near one of my firearms.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
What it can't do is better all other specialist lubricants, penetrating oils, corrosion inhibitors, electrical contact cleaners, etc., etc., that were not designed as simple water dispersants. :D

:eek: Try this for a laugh. Spray a quantity of WD40 into a glass and put it onto a shelf until the aerosol propellant evaporates. The gunky, dirt and dust attracting residue that remains wouldn't be my first choice of 'lubricant' to get anywhere near one of my firearms.
I'm just relaying what I was told by the RFD I bought my rifle from, in this case Ivythorn. I'm pretty sure the guys there sell a bunch of mods each year and I'm pretty sure they wouldn't recommend a maintenance approach that would be detrimental to the kit they sold you, otherwise you'd be going back angry asking for replacements and not using them again.

I'll clean my mod based on the advice I was given by the gunsmith that sold it to me as I'm sure they recommend what works :) If others dont like the idea of using WD40 and prefer to use something else, or not clean their mod at all, then thats a-ok with me.

Out of interest what would you recommend instead?
 
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Taff

Well-Known Member
WD 40 is not a lubricant , it's a water displacement product, a light oil is best for a lubricant.
 

aris

Well-Known Member
FWIW I use a lube called SuperLube on the threads of my shotgun chokes. It is fully synthetic and contains PTFE (Teflon). Works very well, never sticks and doesn't run either. I got it in the US but I believe you can find it here to.
 

Reiver Boy

Well-Known Member
Don't attempt to remove carbon from centre fire rifle Suppressors/Moderators (you can but its pointless and often causes more damage than good), simply use WD40 to displace moisture and NEVER leave them fitted to your rifle, this will cause corrosion/pitting on the crown and into the barrel. Rimfire (fitted to a .22LR) will eventualy fill with toxic gunk but you won't get it out even with the sonic bath.

Forget the inside of the mod (except moisture removal), concentrate on your crown, muzzle thread/suppressor thread and the bearing surfaces
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Don't attempt to remove carbon from centre fire rifle Suppressors/Moderators (you can but its pointless and often causes more damage than good), simply use WD40 to displace moisture and NEVER leave them fitted to your rifle, this will cause corrosion/pitting on the crown and into the barrel. Rimfire (fitted to a .22LR) will eventualy fill with toxic gunk but you won't get it out even with the sonic bath.

Forget the inside of the mod (except moisture removal), concentrate on your crown, muzzle thread/suppressor thread and the bearing surfaces
:tiphat:

You said it much better than I did, but thats what I was told.
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
I think the problem with not cleaning is that eventually the carbon will build up to levels where flakes can break off and fall into the barrel causing problems like the one I experienced. FWIW i cleaned my mod in an ultrasonic bath using a 10% solution of mistral US CAR carburettor cleaner, it removed large amounts of carbon virtually instantly, and by the end of a couple of cycles the water was like black ink. no damage to the mod which is SS anyway, Dried on the rayburn. not a difficult job at all...
 

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