Cleaning kit recommendation?

Griggo06

Well-Known Member
Good afternoon,
I'm looking for what people would recommend as the basics for cleaning a rifle.
I have a 6.5 mm rifle
I am new to rifles, owner a shotgun for a while and that is easy to clean
Rifles seem to be a different story...

The kits seem to have so many different attachments in them. Are they all needed?

Can I just get a Jag and some patches?
What chemical cleaners so people use?
Have done a brief bit of googling but so much **** out there it seems.

Many thanks James
 

mark2853118

Well-Known Member
I have tried many products over the years and currently use Bore Tech eliminator which seems to do a very good job. I use a calibre specific one piece plastic coated steel rod with a non brass jag which doesn't react with the Bore Tech and a nylon bristle brush and round cotton patches to mop the bore and finish the job off with gun oil after the Bore Tech impregnated patches run through clear.

I fall into the clean after every use camp.
 

Rory

Well-Known Member
As above, Boretech Eliminator is my go to.
I would suggest a plastic covered cleaning rod (avoid bore snakes), a plastic brush, a copper/bronze brush, a spearpoint jag (I use ProShot cleaning patches with this) or a knurled jag and get a roll of cleaning flannelette. A bore guide is a good idea (MTM do some generic ones for not a lot of money) to save the ends of jags bashing into chamber mouths and stops the plastic coating gettkng scraped off on the rear of the receiver. Some small plastic picks (long handled AR15 style) are handy for cleaning in the bolt lug area to clean out crud. An old toothbrush or some some soft plastic brushes are also handy for cleaning the bolt face.
 

308tikka

Well-Known Member
Buy a non-brass spear jag.... if you want to speed up the process (no blue on patches).

I use tipton rods-I like them but they are investments, and they are long enough for a long barrel.

A single calibre? Get a Parker Hale yellow rod with a few inches spare over barrel and action length. Easy to get bits and bobs for them in the UK.
 

Griggo06

Well-Known Member
I should mention I actually have two calibres also have a .204

My apologies for not adding that!
 

Fox Tales

Well-Known Member
Bore guide with Oring specific to each rifle , makes the job easier and helps prevent fluid and filth running into the action .

Decent quality rod , the length is a minimum of barrel and action length , personally I prefer them to be near the length of the rifle. Saves rapping your knuckles . Again possibly calibre specific , so you may need 1 for each.

Decent spearpoint jags , preferably proof positive or similar.

Nylon brushs.

Correct size patches .

Cleaning solution , I'm also a fan of Eliminator . Follow the instructions and you can't go wrong . I like to press a treated patch on the muzzle whilst it's soaking .

A means to swab out the rifle chamber .

Anti seize grease for the barrel threads and don't store with the mod' on , it'll eventually ruin the crown and muzzle.

Apologies if I've missed anything.

I rarely mind spending someone else's money.
 

HandB

Well-Known Member
I don't like chemicals so use abrasive paste (JB bore paste) to clean my rifles. I scrub until the bore shines silver, then one patch with oil and put them away.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
The only time you should clean a barrel is after water ingress.

Having spent a lot of time and money cleaning barrels, I stopped. Difference? Rifle performed the same, if not better.

Removing the moderator ASAP after use is vital, though!
 

Lancaster

Well-Known Member
The only time you should clean a barrel is after water ingress.

Having spent a lot of time and money cleaning barrels, I stopped. Difference? Rifle performed the same, if not better.

Removing the moderator ASAP after use is vital, though!
I sort of agree, but when a rifle stops shooting as well as you know it can do, do you not give it a bit of a fettling to get the carbon and copper out to bring it back on song?

I have encountered a fair few rifles that had never seen a proper clean, other than a patch out with Youngs 303 or another gun oil, and the state of some of the barrels was terrible, the owners were convinced that they were shot out, but a decent clean with a good set of solvents rejuvenated them.
 
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