Compressed Loads

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Bradley

Guest
Have been having a discussion with a shooting buddy about the advantages and disadvantages of developing compressed loads for various calibres.

Has anyone any experience in this field?

Or any idea where the best source of information would be?
 

Thar

Well-Known Member
Hi Brad

I have tried them in my 223 using a 3ft drop tube but at the end of the day all the extra trouble of reloading them was not worth the extra fps. In my case, the accuracy was no better than my normal 100% full case loads.

They can off course be dangerous, depending on the type of powder you are using, if you crush the kernels (long extruded types are worse) it can change the burn rate (makes it faster). This can lead to over pressure.

Not for beginners, but you knew that any way. ;)

Thar
 

Rider

Well-Known Member
Compressed loads are usually not someting you aim for. They just happen during the process of load development.
 

NullMac

Well-Known Member
Not necessarily over pressure, depends on the powder.

Nothing wrong with a bit of a crunch but if it is very full try a long drop tube and/or vibrating it down with an electric toothbrush. If there is too much compression and not enough neck tension the bullet can creep and you end up with different lengths.

Have a look at Nosler Load data, they show the case fill for each load.
 

Utectok

Well-Known Member
10” drop tube helps but mild compression is fine in my experience and is hard to avoid with some powder cartridge combinations
 

308tikka

Well-Known Member
You must be making a fortune with your side hustle headlining the Apollo.

Do you shoot compressed loads? I do.... you need a strong action and I would say many actions arent suitable. Prepared to work up in 0.1gn increments? Doubt its worth your while? Dont do it.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I loaded one cartridge to the maximum recommended in my .270 for H4831. The crunch when I seated the bullet put me off enough not to bother even trying to see how it shot. I'm pretty sure every rifle will have a node somewhere well away from a compressed load
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
I loaded one cartridge to the maximum recommended in my .270 for H4831. The crunch when I seated the bullet put me off enough not to bother even trying to see how it shot. I'm pretty sure every rifle will have a node somewhere well away from a compressed load

This is a very common combination for producing a compressed load - so much so that Sierra uses it in its FAQs in its latest handloading manual. Such combinations / results are very common indeed with data from the majority of manuals including many of the 'old favourite' load combinations.

Given the decades of use of 270 Win, 130s, and the 4831s with compressed loads, you most likely turned your back on a not only usable combination here, but an excellent one.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
This is a very common combination for producing a compressed load - so much so that Sierra uses it in its FAQs in its latest handloading manual. Such combinations / results are very common indeed with data from the majority of manuals including many of the 'old favourite' load combinations.

Given the decades of use of 270 Win, 130s, and the 4831s with compressed loads, you most likely turned your back on a not only usable combination here, but an excellent one.
No argument from me there. In my defence though, it was early on in my reloading career and I just didn't know any better. I subsequently decided I wanted to slow down my .270 loads though, and settled on a superb 54g load (actually 2 grains below minimum, but still over 50% case fill) with 130 g SP that's served me admirably for the last few years. It also gave me an additional dozen rounds from a tub of powder :lol:
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
The things you guys worry about. I load 13.5 of Lil Gun in my 22 Hornet. I need to tap the charged case against the bench to settle the powder enough to get the bullet even started in the case mouth. The powder column compresses the full length of the parallel sides of the seated bullet. I am always fascinated by the (especially new) reloaders who, upon seeing a case full of powder resulting from established load data from a reputable source, decide that the data must be wrong/or that they somehow know better/ and that the use of said load will cause them harm.

If reloaders read books on reloading -not the load data, or "how to"- they would have a better understanding of what goes on in a cartridge case when the primer ignites. The internet makes people so lazy.~Muir
 
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