Controversial subject

PKL

Well-Known Member
I know this is a controversial subject, I just wanted to raise it again to see peoples viewpoints 'this year' and if any new members of the forum had opinions not previously expressed.

and the subject is (drumroll),,no, not long range shooting or berger vld's, but hind culling.

The ground I cover is well down on hind/yearling/calf population this year, let's blame the FC over-culls for now (to make it easy), this means that I have no need to cull for the purpose of reducing numbers, but purely to remove unwanted deer and provide the landowner with a few carcasses to meet his annual Argo servicing costs.

This year that involved taking spikers, hummels, and 'button bucks/stags', and during the winter, old hinds with no yearling and/or calf, and orphaned calves, and very weak/small calves that are unlikely to survive the winter.

I was strictly told (not that I needed to be), that if I take any hinds, not to dare show up until I have the calf as well. - I do agree with this of course. I know that's a controversial one, but I did read somewhere that an orphaned calf will only have a 25% chance of survival during the winter, which on more open ground, is the same for roe kids.

any views/thoughts/input - what are you guys targeting for the winter if your numbers don't mean trying to cull to reduce numbers?

hope for constructive conversation, not a slagging match.
 

eggy s

Well-Known Member
Our Roe Does have been shot too heavily over the last 2 years so they are getting a break unless I see any that clearly need dispatching.

So I am targeting the Fallow :D
 

shotz

Well-Known Member
as this has been a very poor year for calves i shall be leaving most hinds on hill and taking all poor hinds and calves. hinds in trees are in better condition shotz
 

Uncle Buck

Well-Known Member
as this has been a very poor year for calves i shall be leaving most hinds on hill and taking all poor hinds and calves. hinds in trees are in better condition shotz
I "PITY" the poor Hind or Calf that comes into range of you Painless!!! :D

Rgds, Buck. :rolleyes:
 

shotz

Well-Known Member
dont worry Uncle buck sure i can manage to fix you up with a few be ready first week december. shotz
 

jubnut

Well-Known Member
If you are shooting Reds aren't they transient between your ground and the FC?

If so then aren't you just leaving Hinds to get shot by someone else?
 

pitiliedon

Well-Known Member
Always difficult to do proper management if you dont have control of the home range. On open hill i try to avoid taking lead hinds unless its with a small family group that i can take out entirely, otherwise i look for late calver's as they will tend to always be late calvers , so i take hind and calf. Also anything that catches my eye as being unthrifty in some way. If its to reduce numbers then even and forward , hinds and calfs ,trying to leave the lead hind and the best bodied in any group.
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
Obviously location, weather, the condition of an individual etc will come in to play but a very experienced (Inverness-shire) hill stalker told me years ago that he felt New Year was the watershed where if he couldn't get a calf it would survive OK. That always stuck with me. He also echoed the above comment of not taking the leading (matriach) hind in a herd. I know a few people who felt that part of the reason we have had such high losses these past 2 winters is there was not a generation of these lead animals who had lived through a really hard winter and knew where to take the herd to escape the wind, get a bite etc.
 

PKL

Well-Known Member
I was not aware of the concept of lead hinds, I guess we learn every day. Excellent information, and I am particularly pleased I can incorporate this practice into my management principles.

very useful comments, keep the coming.
 

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