Copper bullets again

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Fallow doe shot with copper Winchester bullet 270.
Not impressed at all.
 

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stalker.308

Well-Known Member
It looks dead, which is a long way from the cries of the anti-copper lot who talk of pencilling and lost deer.

below is a 130 grain ttsx I recovered this week, first time I have recovered one in 20 deer. It weighed in at 129.7 grains. There will be meat damage, as its been shot, but it did not run.

Its all about shot placement as with any calibre and depends on the speed the round is being pushed at.
 

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slider

Well-Known Member
Roe doe, heart lung shot. Sako Powerhead II 110g copper from .270.
Very little meat damage. (hair licked from the exit wound by the dog.
Most importantly it dropped on the spot.
 

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Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Fallow doe shot with copper Winchester bullet 270.
Not impressed at all.
What is the story behind it Malcom as you do take people who only pick up a rifle once in a while...saying that deer move, we all pull the odd shot especially off twin sticks...
 

StephenToast

Well-Known Member
It's dead isn't it?


Have you skinned many deer in the past? That sort of damage isn't really a surprise is it?

Looks a lot like the bruising that runs in that spongy connective membrane between the skin and the muscle, and between the shoulder and the ribs. I've had that sort of damage where I've not hit a deer quite perfectly with my .30-06. It usually trims right out.

As said above though. Those pictures are next to useless Malc. Really you need to see entry and exit, was it close or far away? Bullet hit anything before reaching the deer? How long from shot to bleed/gralloch? Did it lay on it's side for a while before hanging?

You can't blame that result on the metal your bullet is made of.
 
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NullMac

Well-Known Member
Shocker.

I had a doe last week 270 110gr TTSX, 175 yards. Clean as a whistle. Half an hour later my mate had a doe that he had to finish off with a 308 110gr TTSX from ~15 yards. Totally wrecked. Loin and haunch was ok the rest was totally bloodshot.

Generally I have find copper cleaner than lead, but it is early days. Equally I have had some carcasses that have been badly shot up, when shot at close range/fast hit on a big bone. Which seems to suggest that when the bullet creates multiple missiles there is much more damage. Not really very surprising when I think about it. If it is true.

What I am going to do when reloading the next batch is wind the velocities back to more "normal" levels as I think the "lighter bullet, higher velocity" thing has an upper limit. So wind the 270 110's back to 3150 or similar at the muzzle. So impacts at 100 yards are below 3000.

Have not shot a Red Stag with one yet, but on Roe, Sika and Red Hinds it does the business very well.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
What I am going to do when reloading the next batch is wind the velocities back to more "normal" levels as I think the "lighter bullet, higher velocity" thing has an upper limit. So wind the 270 110's back to 3150 or similar at the muzzle. So impacts at 100 yards are below 3000.

Hope you have a decent dog.
 

Overlay

Well-Known Member
Grassed a fallow doe last year using .243 100 grn lead soft point the round hit the shoulder bone on exiting and went straight up between the ribs and the shoulder, right old mess lost the exit shoulder and neck, the deer dropped on the spot, so not a disaster can’t get it perfect every time, they do look worse than it is with all the colouration
just a smidgen of an angle can make a huge difference meat wise, its a goes home beast, nothing really lost, it is what it is
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
Just looked at the specific gravity tables of different materials.
Quartz sand = 7
Copper = 8.89
Lead = 11.35
Being a lateral thinker according to my old Aachen University graduate boss :-
When working in Buenos Aries in 1996 I experimented with home made Glaser style safety slugs by melting out the lead from some .358 cal jacketet 180 gr Hornady InterLock Spire point single shot pistol bullets and filling the jackets up with #9 shot won from from shotgun shells then topped it off with an epoxy puddle to hold them in. End weight was 90 grs. I was getting an estimated 1900 fps from my 10 inch "scoped" Contender .357 Mag barrel with a louder boom and muzzle flash as proven by the crowds standing behind me at the range after my shooting it (WTFWT) :cuckoo: but the accuracy I achieved astounded me as they were hitting dead on as with my normal .357 ammo, my theory is that the centrifugal forces from the rifling stabilized the projectile very well at the 300,000 revs per minute that it left the spout at.
Now lets take a rifle .270 Win 150 grainer soft point bullet say, melt out the lead then fill up the jacket with fine Quartz sand to achieve a better fill than #9 shot would acting almost like a solid, centrifugal force should function here too then top off the sand with epoxy and try it on targets first. A thick copper jacket and sand would be eco friendly and much cheaper than turning up copper/brass bullets.
Maybe it works as a fox load and might make shooting edible game an option. naturally it would need lots of testing first.
I will make up some testers for my Ruger #1 as it is a very strong action. Only the copper jacket will contact the bore so no worse wear wise than all the presently used projectiles. Might be mightily cheaper too.
Discuss :-
 
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