Copper may be short lived

BRACES of Bristol - Mauser M12 with Schmidt & Bender 2.5-10x56 Illuminated Scope

Laurie

Well-Known Member
But, the thing is that we are on a journey with the so called “non-toxic” bullets. Copper may not be the final destination as we are still quite early in that journey and it isn’t until things are forced that real innovation starts to kick in, as they say necessity is the mother of invention.

That's the way it is. If bullets end up at three times current prices thanks to metals shortage, nobody is going to allow any reversion to lead. Remember too, that lead-core bullet prices depend heavily on world copper prices, so expect some eye-watering increases well above inflation there too. (Likewise, cases and primers.)

On the wider front, if electric car prices don't drop with higher volumes thanks to materials prices, then people will simply be told to walk, cycle, or use public transport. Same with being unable to heat your house. Sorry (not really, or even at all!), but that's the way things are, the politicians will tell us and with all main parties committed to zero net emissions who does the disaffected voter turn to?

There are already predictions that public anger will be immense once a lot of this kicks in, and as well as riots in the streets we'll likely see a mould-breaking Nigel Farage type politico emerge alongside an anti-ecology party.

Interesting times!
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
I agree with the point you are making but your closing line doesn't really hold much water if you think in parallel with say asbestos.
That comes from the ground but you try getting rid of it and its not that easy
🤔
When I was a kid my father brought home asbestos from an asbestos mine. It looks a bit like slate but is see-through in it's natural state.... It is a product of nature.... just put it back into the ground after use. It is only a form of glass anyway with an awkward fibre size for the human lung.
edi
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
Sadly the cost of whatever we end up having to use will only affect we stalkers and general public interest in the whole thing will be zero unless someone works out how to compress Lentils in to usable bullets
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
I agree with the point you are making but your closing line doesn't really hold much water if you think in parallel with say asbestos.
That comes from the ground but you try getting rid of it and its not that easy
🤔
Best done at night
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
There are already predictions that public anger will be immense once a lot of this kicks in, and as well as riots in the streets we'll likely see a mould-breaking Nigel Farage type politico emerge alongside an anti-ecology party.

No need for prediction or crystal balls, as the activities of the supporters of anti-ecology mould-breaking Donald Trump have already shown in Washington recently.

Alan
 
Last edited:

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
Does that take into account that copper is recyclable?

How much lead do we have left?
Eh? It's hardly viable to scour the countryside with a metal detector after each shot to collect the spent bullets. Lead's recyclable too, and 5 times cheaper.
I love that there are so many people who are trying to find any reason, factual or not, to argue against using lead free bullets.
But, the thing is that we are on a journey with the so called “non-toxic” bullets. Copper may not be the final destination as we are still quite early in that journey and it isn’t until things are forced that real innovation starts to kick in, as they say necessity is the mother of invention. However, what I am sure about is that if the shooting community doesn’t try to move with, not be a slave to, but move with public opinion then we are going to hand a whole bunch of negative publicity to the anti-shooting community who will use it to push a narrative of nature hating, cruel hunters who are unwilling to stop poisoning the earth.

It's not a journey; it's a collective delusion.
The recent propensity for the more gullible segment of the shooting market to think that we're going to make ourselves popular with the wider public by switching away from the traditional product in favour of spraying rarer, strategic metals around the countryside is truly bizarre. If you want to take account of public opinion, stop shooting and start poncing around on instagram with a drink made from cabbage.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
9.2 Cents at that rate (1 Ton = 2000# = 14 000 000 grains), but the copper wire / bar might cost more??
That's what I worked it out at! Different manufacturing processes will be blamed for high bullet prices methinks.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
It's a false premise. When I was a kid (I was born in 1957) copper would only be mined if there was BBB percentage per ton of material mined. When my father was a boy (before WW1 as he was born in 1907) it'd only be mined if there was AAA percent. Nowadays it is maybe CCC percent. It is being mined where before WW1 it wouldn't even have been looked at as it wasn't economically viable. But JUST LIKE OIL as the price rises exploitable reserves increase.
 
PSE Composites Limited
Top