Costs of tree planting

scotspine

Well-Known Member
Depends on specification....

1.2m tree shelters @ 2.5m spacing - say £1600

Open planted trees @ 2m spacing, deer fenced - say £2700
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
It's a piece of ground that needs some roosting cover, there is usually some form of game crop nearby. There are also other areas that had woodland clear felled a couple of years ago that need replaced, waiting on land owner to honour his word, and stop pleading poverty...
 

rick6point5

Well-Known Member
What size are you wanting to plant, whips, standards, semi's? I think any of these will take some time to get to a size that will offer any form of roosting opportunity for even the smallest of birds
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
The land owner assured us, a fair while ago, that he had taken advice from a local sporting estate on what to plant, and that it would take 5- 6 years to offer suitable cover. Is this a bit unrealistic ? If planted in the right area it would be next to existing mature stuff which the birds do roost in, so would initially offer a form of holding cover ?
All advice gratefully accepted.
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
I'd consider biomass willow, up to 4m in first year, also do some parts with reed canary grass for nesting cover. I recently got 1000 cuttings for just £109 from yorkshire willow for some of my fields and for 'buck attractants'
 

Shabz

Well-Known Member
Where about are you? It's quite likely that you would be eligible for grant aid to plant your area. It needn't cost you much at all. Contact your local forestry commission area office (in England) or conservancy office (in Scotland).

I believe the planting schemes are closed at the moment but should be going again by the summer. You won't plant anything until the autum now anyway.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
The biomass willow growing that fast could be a good option if the area were more sheltered, I've seen the willow that was planted locally for harvesting and then not getting harvested for some reason, growing at all angles due to the wind. It does hold birds, but I don't think they roost there, they tend to go back to the bordering woods.
I'll look into the forestry grants and see if I can put some convincing figures together to convince the landowner.
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
The biomass willow growing that fast could be a good option if the area were more sheltered, I've seen the willow that was planted locally for harvesting and then not getting harvested for some reason, growing at all angles due to the wind. It does hold birds, but I don't think they roost there, they tend to go back to the bordering woods.
I'll look into the forestry grants and see if I can put some convincing figures together to convince the landowner.
You nick the stems at 1.5m and lay at angles to give thick hedge rows for example with grasses growing under. Just one option
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Wot are u actually tring to achieve?
Holding cover, flushing cover for a drive or roosting cover? In 1 post u say it joins onto a wood they already roost in.

Have a look throu either BASC or GWCT sites for woodland design. Depending on wot ur after it would change but some shrubby plants bushes would help, possibly 2 or 3 rows of evergreen trees round outside say Sitka Spruce and top them to bush them out, say first row at 3ft 2nd row 5ft etc to create a nice warm rising woodland edge.
Birds always seem to like roosting in larch trees if no larch disease down ur way, and make good trees in front of a flushing point

Some of the hybrid willow for boifuels is very very fast growing with very few side branches u might be beter with more natural willow cut from elsewhere on ur shoot (so free) but mind leaves will come off so not as warm as evergreen round edges

1 shoot i know has planted some very clever woods with big open blocks in middle that they occasionally put cover crops (works without the crops in to as just long grassy cover) in so birds have to clear the high trees in front to go over gun line, and as blocks are spaced out along the wood u get more gradual flusjhes as drive goes on instead of all birds bunching at the flushing point

U could save on costs by planting it urself, 1 acre is not that big an area, if softwoods u'd expect a good man to almost do it in a day
 
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Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Wot are u actually tring to achieve?
Holding cover, flushing cover for a drive or roosting cover? In 1 post u say it joins onto a wood they already roost in.
The biomass willow I refer to is on a different shoot, and as you say, very little in the way of side branches, the stuff just grows up.
The pieces of land that need the planting are scrub areas, rough grass, whins, etc, . Owner of some of that has a duty to re plant a few acres to replace what he removed 3 years ago. The other bit is a patch of ground about 3-4 acres that is surrounded by crop fields. It does hold partridges and the occasional pheasant, but would do a lot better if there was some roosting cover.
I've seen bits of ground on local estates which have wide spaced coniferous type plantation, plenty nice green undergrowth etc, this is what I would be aiming for.
 

MrMickeyD

Well-Known Member
As others have said, depends what your after. If it helps:

small cell grown broadleaves 40-60cm about 40p
tubex standard tube (600mm) about 60p
stake (32x32x900) about 27p

then someone to plant it: my contractors currently @ 65p per stem (less if go for bare root stock (55?) and less still (20p?) if you go without tubes..)

prices, of course, depend on volume - more you buy, cheaper the unit cost.

If you want some more info re woodland design, tree spacing, species choice, etc, drop me a pm..

M
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
The biomass willow I refer to is on a different shoot, and as you say, very little in the way of side branches, the stuff just grows up.
The pieces of land that need the planting are scrub areas, rough grass, whins, etc, . Owner of some of that has a duty to re plant a few acres to replace what he removed 3 years ago. The other bit is a patch of ground about 3-4 acres that is surrounded by crop fields. It does hold partridges and the occasional pheasant, but would do a lot better if there was some roosting cover.
I've seen bits of ground on local estates which have wide spaced coniferous type plantation, plenty nice green undergrowth etc, this is what I would be aiming for.

Wot i meant is do u want to drive the wood in the future? or a roosting/pen wood u drive birds back too? or just walk it up with a few mates.
The design would/could be different for each. Also how bigs ur pot of money to spend as it will alter wot u can do.
i thought u had to replant woods to get ur felling licence, so possibly it is already decided wot numbers/species has to go back in
U may find as trees grow it will push the partridge out, generally don't like trees

If moneys tight, take some willow cuttings urself, can do the same wit rhodyes, laurel, snowberry box etc but some can become invasive if not managed

Possibly putting a few small clumps of Sitka might work beter than planting larger areas with wider spacings, or a few rows of sitka round edges to create a cheap quick hedge.

To add to wot mickey said ur looking a 2500 trees to an hectare (commercail 2m spacings, 2.2ish acres i think)

Wot did the local shoot boy advise the landowner to plant? Be easier to advise if u can see the area
 

Shabz

Well-Known Member
If you're replanting area that has been felled under a felling licence then the site, area, species, spacing and design will all already have been decided before the felling licence was approved. If the area was felled three years ago then he needs to get his finger out and replant it. Felling licences are usually valid for two years and must be replanted by the next June.

If you want to create new woodland then the new woodland grant scheme (in Scotland at least) will be open late spring/early summer. There are a range of models available from productive conifer through birch woodlands and to native broadleaves. These are all different models with different stocking densities and different grant support rates.

If you don't want to claim grant aid and just plant whatever you want to plant at your own cost, then you need to be aware of the Environmental Impact Assessment regulations. I would recommend deciding what your priorities are and how the woodland should meet your needs and then talk to your local woodland officer from the forestry commission. It's free and impartial advice that will keep you right.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Thanks folks, really appreciate your input. Had a chat with Mickey, got a few pointers. Obviously need to try and get the owner of the previously felled land to disclose the terms of his felling licence, and if it existed, and ask if he truly intends to honour his promise to us that he would replant, albeit in a different area. As for the other bit of ground, had a chat with the owner yesterday, and he is looking at the possibilities.
 

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