Covid-19 - humans and animals

Spix

Well-Known Member
No apologies necessary. Context is essential, afterall our current situation is not an Influenza or Smallpox epidemic. Smallpox, before the introduction of a vaccine in the 1850s used to kill 10-15% of the population, put that in today's figures!

Along with the writings of Churchill the biography of Edward Jenner is worth reading, and compare their world and all the achievements of the time to ours.
 
Years ago when there was concern of rabies crossing the channel, serious consideration was given to developing an emergency protocol which would empower the state to enforce the destruction of all dogs and cats in the UK in order to prevent the disease spreading

The moment I read about the possibility of Covid being transmissible between animal species I was reminded of that old protocol

Can't imagine it doing down too well !
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
Its seems able to jump species . From intelligence it broke out from Wuhan's livestock market , from what animal its not clear as they eat everything and anything , but pigs are considered suspect as with the Spanish Flu / Swine Fever outbreak in 1918 . We do and can catch similar virus' from cats and as mentioned above we have a tiger in Bronx Zoo that tested positive after having a cough . So far only mild symptoms are showing but if cats can carry the virus ,they can pass it on to humans and possibly mutate it . Cats also have a natural propensity to roam and don't understand lock downs and the feral population has been left unchecked . Tests on other migratory species must also continue and could be both a good and bad thing for the wildfowlers in the shooting community .
I'm hoping this doesn't lead to people abandoning their pets , simply because a member of the cat family has the virus , as they may also provide the answer .
pigs are considered suspect as with the Spanish Flu / Swine Fever outbreak in 1918 .
I am wondering about the cause of the big outbreak in Germany this last week at a few large slaughterhouses with Romanian/Bulgarians almost slave labouring doing the work then living in slumlord crowded tenement conditions every night.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Years ago when there was concern of rabies crossing the channel, serious consideration was given to developing an emergency protocol which would empower the state to enforce the destruction of all dogs and cats in the UK in order to prevent the disease spreading

The moment I read about the possibility of Covid being transmissible between animal species I was reminded of that old protocol

Can't imagine it doing down too well !
Wouldn't go down too well here...Cat and dog and humans have been in semi-isolation...bloody delivery drivers will keep patting the dog though :(

Definitely both are part of the team. During lockdown my main shooting has been rats in the duck run and under the bird table which the dog retrieves, and we are only just keeping neck and neck with the old cat...she would be sorely missed.

Alan
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
We manage well enough with our yard dogs abroad where rabies is endemic, they're vaccinated but getting all owners to vaccinate here if rabies were endemic would be a real challenge - modern Britain :rolleyes:
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
pigs are considered suspect as with the Spanish Flu / Swine Fever outbreak in 1918 .
I am wondering about the cause of the big outbreak in Germany this last week at a few large slaughterhouses with Romanian/Bulgarians almost slave labouring doing the work then living in slumlord crowded tenement conditions every night.
A worldwide problem and not confined to the pig processing industry.

Coronavirus: Why have there been so many outbreaks in meat processing plants?
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
There is always the potential for a swine flu epidemic, and the media will be in full swing about this (for a number of reasons) as the flu season approaches.

Apparently these 'new' genotypes have been predominant in pigs since 2016 and have already infected people although apparently no cases of person to person transmission have been recorded.

Prevalent Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza virus with 2009 pandemic viral genes facilitating human infection

Thanks for posting, keep it up!
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
Weekly roundup.

USDA / CDC circular, 'Interim SARS-CoV-2 Guidance and Recommendations for Farmed Mink and Other Mustelids' recently distributed to mink producers in Wisconsin, centre of the USA's mink industry attached in pdf.

SARS-CoV-2 infection in farmed minks, the Netherlands, April and May 2020, mentions the Covid-19 in cats issue being investigated by three Dutch institutions

Coronavirus: New COVID-19 infection found on mink farm in Netherlands (the 18th so far)

In Denmark a third mink farm has been infected, in Danish (there are over 100 mink farms in Denmark)

Danish Veterinary and Food Administration precautions on contacting mink where infection or confirmed infection with COVID-19 is suspected:

Prevention measures if you have contact with mink in a suspected or infected herd (translated)

1. Personnel with symptoms of COVID-19 should be tested and not come
into the stable.
2. Restrict the circle of persons in the stable and avoid visitors.
3. Pets are not allowed in the barn.
4. Avoid contact with house cats.
5. Hand hygiene:
- The hands are washed frequently and at least before entering the
stable; after contact with animals, cages, and feed; if the hands are
dirty; before eating; and after coughing / sneezing;
- When you leave the barn area, both handwashing and hand disinfection
are performed;
- Handwashing is used if the hands are visibly dirty or damp and after
a toilet visit;
- Hand disinfection can be used if the hands are visibly clean and dry
(alcohol 70-85% added glycerol) [additional comments re handwashing
included].
6. Cough or sneeze in the sleeve.
7. With water and soap, frequently clean surfaces contacted by others,
such as taps, work tools.
8. Avoid bringing items into the stable, such as watches, finger
rings, mobile phones, tools, etc.
9. Avoid eating/drinking/smoking and the like in the barn area.
10. Put on protective gear prior to entering the animal housing area
[details included].
11. Ensure respiratory protection, minimum FFP2. The mask should be
close to the face.
12. Use goggles or face visors.
13. Take a bath after work and before contact with household members.

If your mink herd is suspected or found to be infected with COVID-19,
the herd will be placed under public supervision by the National Food
Authority. This means, among other things, that you are not allowed to
move animals or equipment that can spread infection from your herd.
You will receive public oversight in writing from the National Board
of Food, which describes these restrictions in more detail.

Denmark's environment and food minister, quoted in 2015 : "The production of mink pelts is important for the Danish economy and employs thousands of people … Denmark has a long tradition of producing pelt of the very highest quality, and there is a great demand for them. The government has no plans to follow the Netherlands' example [in banning mink farming].

List of mustelids of the world
 

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