Covid Testing in Deer

cyberstag

Well-Known Member
Remarkable coincidence.... a long standing customer asked just today if my Venison had been TB tested and he was quite serious.

Willowbank.
If your customer asked the question and he was serious were you able to give him the correct answer? If you were talking about wild venison presumably the answer would have been that they had not been tested, nor had they had proper meat inspection if they had gone through a game dealer because all the most important bits that needed inspection would have been removed by the "hunter" prior to arrival at the game dealer.

This is what makes a mockery of current FSA rules. Farmed deer must go live to an abattoir where EVERYTHING is inspected thoroughly. Any TB failure then triggers a movement restriction. If you want to try and clear your herd of TB you will probably be asked to skin test the whole lot which is totally meaningless and a waste of time, effort and money. More meaningful is to do the skin teat followed by the blood test, if Defra will pay for it or if you can afford to pay for it. Even then nobody knows yet how effective the combination is. It also means putting you deer through the handling system three times; Day 1 and 3 for the skin test and about 3 weeks later for the blood test. And all probably needing to be done twice per year if you can find the windows between calving and de-antlering.

I feel it is only a matter of time before deer will be classed as either wild or farmed; no halfway house for parks etc. Yes, very tough for some people but how else can the food hygiene standards for venison be trusted by the public.
With farmed deer there should be records kept of all medicines administered (if any) and complete control of everything they eat. Wild deer in contrast can have chomped there way through the most heavily sprayed crop in the area in the days before beings shot. You could google the info on Glyphosate poisoning which it is alleged is the real cause of leaky gut syndrome. Of course many regular livestock farmers will have used Glyphosate so cattle and sheep could also be affected; its just all part of the complications of food production in our world where profit drives everything.
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
If your customer asked the question and he was serious were you able to give him the correct answer? If you were talking about wild venison presumably the answer would have been that they had not been tested, nor had they had proper meat inspection if they had gone through a game dealer because all the most important bits that needed inspection would have been removed by the "hunter" prior to arrival at the game dealer.

This is what makes a mockery of current FSA rules. Farmed deer must go live to an abattoir where EVERYTHING is inspected thoroughly. Any TB failure then triggers a movement restriction. If you want to try and clear your herd of TB you will probably be asked to skin test the whole lot which is totally meaningless and a waste of time, effort and money. More meaningful is to do the skin teat followed by the blood test, if Defra will pay for it or if you can afford to pay for it. Even then nobody knows yet how effective the combination is. It also means putting you deer through the handling system three times; Day 1 and 3 for the skin test and about 3 weeks later for the blood test. And all probably needing to be done twice per year if you can find the windows between calving and de-antlering.

I feel it is only a matter of time before deer will be classed as either wild or farmed; no halfway house for parks etc. Yes, very tough for some people but how else can the food hygiene standards for venison be trusted by the public.
With farmed deer there should be records kept of all medicines administered (if any) and complete control of everything they eat. Wild deer in contrast can have chomped there way through the most heavily sprayed crop in the area in the days before beings shot. You could google the info on Glyphosate poisoning which it is alleged is the real cause of leaky gut syndrome. Of course many regular livestock farmers will have used Glyphosate so cattle and sheep could also be affected; its just all part of the complications of food production in our world where profit drives everything.

My what a bundle of fun you are, just made everyone turn veggie 😂

Willowbank
 
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