Cows put to pasture

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Pointer

Well-Known Member
I have noticed movement of muntjac and roe since cows have returned to their pastures. I am sure it is due to the presence of the cows and not other factors (deer poached etc). Has anyone else noticed this over recent weeks? Or has anyone else noticed any other interesting interactions between deer and movements in livestock in general?

Would be interested to hear other members views on the subject, especially relating to roe and munties in England.

Cheers
 

TheRealChuckNorris

Well-Known Member
I have both Roe and Muntjac on the dairy farm and they seem to exist pretty well together. Obviously I don't see them grazing on the same tuft but these deer don't seem too scared by the herd and stick close to the woodland's edge. There's a track running into the farm with woods either side and when I'm lay up observing them they'll dart for cover when a tractor goes passed but be back out within five mins.
 

garyw

Well-Known Member
watch pasture with calves on charlie loves calf muck took a few last year on a 2 acre paddock with calves on it.
 

Disco Stu

Well-Known Member
We turned a number of cattle out last week, the roe are still in the same fields as the cattle and adjacent hedgerows and wooded strips as they were while the cattle were inside.
 

Robin

Well-Known Member
On one of my shoots they have put a few sheep in an end field, the deer (Fallow) nearly always use this as an escape route. (not my land),when we have stalked it. The other day I was out with a client and I saw the deer hanging on the top of the bank, but not going over the fence into the field. We gently stalked to the end of the wood and then down the edge toward the deer. I looked into the field expecting to see someone working but nothing, just sheep.We got ever closer to the top edge only to find the deer were now coming back along and down into the valley below us. they collected up at about 25 yds among the trees looking to where they had come from but no way were they going to go out into that field, I am sure the sheep were the reason, as on many occasions they have gone there even when people have been working. At least it made the client happy standing only a few yards away from them for a few minutes before deciding which one too shoot at. The rest of the year this field is either empty or has horses in it and the deer feed with the horses all the time. This is something I have noticed many times before and try to make use of it when sheep are about on any of the places that I stalk and their presence has helped hold them back, giving you that extra chance.
 

Wingy

Well-Known Member
I have a field (not my permission) to the east & adjacent to our woods. You can almost guarantee roe being out on this field at first light slowly making their way back over the wall and into the woods as it becomes properly light. This is the same whether the field is empty, cattle grazing or even sheep grazing. The only time you won't find roe anywhere near is after muck spreading.
Wingy
 

berg

Well-Known Member
I found that when the cattle are put back out quite often so are the mineral buckets, have shot one or to of them with there heads in having a lick ?
 

PeteL

Well-Known Member
It has been my experience that deer will not graze in fields where there are sheep. Perhaps it's the smell which may mask that of predators or that sheep crop back the grass to a level where deer are unable to feed - I don't know. They don't seem to mind cows or horses. Roe certainly as well as fallow will avoid muck-spreading for some time as well as fields that have been fertilised. Presumably, once the muck or fertiliser has been washed into the soil and new growth starts coming through, it's good grazing.
Peter
 
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