Cracked laminate stock

RTreble

Well-Known Member
I found on my laminate stock of the Tikka T3 .270 has a crack / split / de-laminating at the front and rear end of the magazine & trigger mechanism hole. It seems to be developing where the layers of wood are bonded together. Its not wide nor long but obliviously its present.
What to do - replace stock? Send it way to have it doweled? Just live with it?

Whats the thoughts from the masses...

Ruari

p.s will get photos at some point.
 

J111

Well-Known Member
I found on my laminate stock of the Tikka T3 .270 has a crack / split / de-laminating at the front and rear end of the magazine & trigger mechanism hole. It seems to be developing where the layers of wood are bonded together. Its not wide nor long but obliviously its present.
What to do - replace stock? Send it way to have it doweled? Just live with it?

Whats the thoughts from the masses...

Ruari

p.s will get photos at some point.
I was going to suggest dowelling. Could you drill holes across the stock and epoxy in some carbon rod?


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RTreble

Well-Known Member
I was thinking wooden dowels as these are grooved to hold the glue. Whats the advantage of carbon for this application?
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
That happens very often with plywood stocks especially if not bedded and heavier recoiling rifles. The fix is not as complicated as one thinks. After repairing the crack and maybe a dowel I would pillar bed the stock. Important is to have the action screw holes larger than the screws. M6 in a 8mm hole. Possibly relieve the bedding in the rear of the action somewhat so that the recoil is taken up via recoil lug not the rear of the action in the stock.
Problem with wooden or plywood stocks is that there is not a single fibre of wood going sideways across the stock. Composite stocks have an advantage there.
edi
 

J111

Well-Known Member
That happens very often with plywood stocks especially if not bedded and heavier recoiling rifles. The fix is not as complicated as one thinks. After repairing the crack and maybe a dowel I would pillar bed the stock. Important is to have the action screw holes larger than the screws. M6 in a 8mm hole. Possibly relieve the bedding in the rear of the action somewhat so that the recoil is taken up via recoil lug not the rear of the action in the stock.
Problem with wooden or plywood stocks is that there is not a single fibre of wood going sideways across the stock. Composite stocks have an advantage there.
edi
Boyds stocks have plastic dowels across the stock for this reason.


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J111

Well-Known Member
I was thinking wooden dowels as these are grooved to hold the glue. Whats the advantage of carbon for this application?
You could use wood of course but could you get them to look good after?

I was thinking carbon would could be sanded down and might look cool/ like it was meant to be there? If you bedded it all as someone else said of would fill in the old cracks and stop water getting in etc and hide the cracks.


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paul o'

Well-Known Member
How old is it if it were me i'd just replace with one of GRS bitfrost/other cheap and hold up better to weather
 

Big Bang Theory

Well-Known Member
I look forward to the pictures - be better for thoughts then. Wooden dowels/rods don’t have to be bought with grooves in. You can use the best diameter rod for the repair, and put your own grooves for the glue by crimping them with a pair of pliers.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Or just drill a use a threaded rod (m4-m5) shorter than the width, glue in with epoxy and fill flush, after setting sand the over stand of epoxy back if needed. Don't have to have the hole go out the other side.
edi
 

Fosbery Holster

Well-Known Member
That happens very often with plywood stocks especially if not bedded and heavier recoiling rifles. The fix is not as complicated as one thinks. After repairing the crack and maybe a dowel I would pillar bed the stock. Important is to have the action screw holes larger than the screws. M6 in a 8mm hole. Possibly relieve the bedding in the rear of the action somewhat so that the recoil is taken up via recoil lug not the rear of the action in the stock.
Problem with wooden or plywood stocks is that there is not a single fibre of wood going sideways across the stock. Composite stocks have an advantage there.
edi

Now this is “only a suggestion” as most of the options have been covered.

In heavier recoiling rifles a “recoil bolt” is fitted about the area you were discussing, this is fitted as the rifle is being built, so therefore is fitted perfectly and maybe engraved.
Is it at all possible you could find such a “bolt” from a scrap rifle maybe from your local gunsmith who as you know scraps worn out rifles, I don’t think they would even charge for it, well mine wouldn’t!
Do hope you solve the problem. (a recoil bolt would pull both sides together).
 

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