Dangerous Game Bedding

Ronin

Distinguished Member
I dont post very often on here about the commissions I undertake, but thought it may be of interest to some to see a relatively different and difficult bedding job on a 375 H&H Winchester.

The rifle is actually quite lovely to hold and comes up perfectly to the shoulder.

The rifle is true Controlled Round Feed with three position safety, very easy to operate and the bolt quite surprisingly slick to cycle.

The owner asked me to bed it as they did not think that the manufacturers offering was up to scratch.

I noticed when I stripped the gun down, the manufacturers had used some kind of sticky "bedding" pad on the bottom metal, which was proud of the underside of the forend, I also noticed the internal box mag was the cause, too long for the stock by 030"

Anyway, having dismantled the rifle to base components the stock was nicely inletted but has the most awful dollops of squishy "putty like" bedding in the recoil lug, tang and barrel recoil lug areas.







All the putty was machined out and the stock prepared for alloy pillars and suitable bedding material (Devcon)

The alloy pillars function is simply to stop the action bolts compressing the stock, they do not take any recoil, all forces are transferred tom the stock at three points, barrel lug, action recoil lug and tang recoil lug.

The stock also has two cross bolts to prevent splitting - another factor which needs taking into account when machining the pillars without touching the forward cross bolt.

Stock nearly ready for pillars and compound - some more old bedding to remove yet.





Alloy pillars were machined to length and diameter with central hole of such size no part of the action screw will touch, then the action laid out and prepped for compound (Devcon)

Once the stock and action were coated with Devcon (pillars placed using slave bolts) I put the two together and after clean up left to cure 24 hrs

This image is after cure



Moments after separating:







The barrel lug required certain prep to prevent it becoming stuck to the fore end at the lug is brazed to the barrel (round with slot to square surface leaves gaps that can cause the whole barrelled action to be stuck and a scrap stock...)

Clean up







Finished









Barrel still free floating before and aft recoil lug




In all, an interesting job and not something id want to undertake as a "diy" job



Admin - if this is percieved as advertising - please advise and I'll arrange trade account
 

Redneck

Well-Known Member
I don't know but it came into this country 2012 , in stock at a dealers who I bought it from brand new.

Interested in any other info you have ?

Cheers
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
On a nice wooden stocked rifle the wood and the metal should all merge as one. I have seen really nice wooden stocked rifles ruined by a gray line of bedding seeping up and round the action - it looks horrible, and I would be unhappy if this was my rifle.

By all means bed the lugs and action bed etc, but around the action keep the top 2mm or so of wood tight against the action. And mix the compound with burnt sienna and other dies (you can get from any good art shop) so that it at least matches the wood.

This is how my Rigby is bedded - and it shoots extremely well. I have a Heym that is similarly bedded. With both rifles you have to remove the stock to tell that they are bedded.

With a heavy recoiling rifle you actually need to leave a small gap between the rear of the tang and wood otherwise the stock will start to split. The recoil should all the transferred via the recoil lug.
 

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Ronin

Distinguished Member
I guess Winchester put three recoil lugs on the rifle to be used as such and the factory putty bedding was in those places

All now replaced with a more suitable compound

The joint lines are visible but barely - no stock material has been removed at the upper contact points

Glad most people appreciate the work involved to achieve the results shown
 

Ronin

Distinguished Member
The Winchester tang is a simple taper that sits above the wood of the stock there is a lug abutment which forms part of the trigger hanger but obviously used as a secondary recoil lug - no danger of splitting stock.

There is less danger of a properly bedded rifle splitting the stock than one that has none - recoil forces in an invested stock will allow the action to move rearwards. Whereas an action that is bedded simply will not move so all forces are imparted at the points of contact with the recoil lugs and those alone
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Now if I would put a DG rifle together for myself I would not give a toss about a little grey line. More important would be that the recoil management in the stock is sound.
edi
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
I guess Winchester put three recoil lugs on the rifle to be used as such and the factory putty bedding was in those places

All now replaced with a more suitable compound

The joint lines are visible but barely - no stock material has been removed at the upper contact points

Glad most people appreciate the work involved to achieve the results shown
Excellent workmanship. Thank you for taking the time to post it here.. :thumb:
 

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