de Haviland FB-26 Mosquito fly by

finnbear270

Well-Known Member

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Ahh the sound of a winner , add in the songbirds and it just was a delightful vid , it could just as well have been filmed in 1944 on the south downs of England :tiphat:
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Stunning! The only plane that I prefer to my Uncle's old F-4 Phantom
The F-4 Phantom is a lot like the Mosquito: a big fighter with a lot of power, which could carry more bombs than most World War II bombers, and whip any enemy plane, or two. It could put the bombs right down the stack, which a friend of mine did to a ship in Haiphong harbor, from about 500 feet, in a rainstorm.

My father's A-26 was a lot like the Mosquito, very fast, but more of a bomber and close ground support with 4 to 8 Browning .50 BMGs, cannon, and rockets.
The P-38 was fast, but a fighter and recon aircraft, with very long range, not a bomber at all. My uncle flew those, and Spitfires, over Europe.
 
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Old-YOP

Well-Known Member
I always thought the pathfinders that flew them seemed especially brave, considering their construction.
That construction being a stessed plywood covering (hence the moniker "The Wooden Wonder"), a choice made by the designers de Havilland partly because wood was a "non-strategic" material. I imagine that the crews liked it for its speed and the fact that - as with the Hurricane's fabric-covered fuselage of tubular steel and wooden formers - you could have rounds go through it and bits shot off it and it would still get you home.

But I never knew how successful it was. The Aviation Online Museum says that "it was probably the most successfully versatile of any twin-engined type built between 1939 and 1945. It excelled in all the widely varied roles. Its duties included the duties of low-level and high-attack day and night bomber, long-range photo-reconnaissance, mine layer, pathfinder, high-speed military transport, long-range day and night fighter, and fighter-bomber. It served in Europe, the Middle and Far East and on the Russian front. In fact, the ubiquitous Mosquito reigned supreme among General Purpose types. Of the grand total of 7,781 Mosquitos built, 6,710 were delivered during the war years."

There's a load of aviation restoration talent in NZ. Already the number of 'new' Fokker triplanes built at Omaka and other centres stands at about 10% of Fokker's original WW1 production level!

Lots of single-engined WW2 fighters flying there too, but this Mozzie restoration is a real triumph.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
It was sad to see the crash of that Mosquito at Duxford.

My son and I saw a crash like that once. We had been to an air show near our home, and as we drove up to the lane, we saw this Corsair in trouble, and could hear the engine sputtering. We drove towards it, and saw it go down in a tiny patch of woods on a cul de sac, no more than 50 yards from any of the four homes there. He had dead sticked it there when he realized he could not make it to the soccer field, and put it straight down to avoid the people below. We were the first ones there, and there was literally nothing left.... all just driven into the mud. Such a valiant and skilled pilot that fellow was.
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
I have loads of photos of the Hawarden Mozzie, after being "Ground looped", & the work to restore her on the aerodrome before her later loss at Barton.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I once worked with a retired US Air Force Major who was once stationed in Algeria in the late fifties or early 60's in a radar station. He said they picked up a 'bogey" traveling low and fast across the desert that was initially identified as some sort of jet. Turned out to be a Mosquito that was being used by an oil company for mapping or similar work. Awesome aircraft. I pull out my copy of "666 Squadron" sometimes just to watch the flying footage.~Muir
 

GWP

Well-Known Member
Guy i served my time as a coachpainter with was a corporal in the air force during ww2 his main role was sticking pieces of canvas with dope over bullet holes and painting little crosses on the side:D
 

CharlieT

Well-Known Member
Yes, did indeed take me back. Father was a Mosquito Pathfinder pilot and some of my earliest memories are of him, when he got the chance, flying over our house waving his wings on his return from an op.
 

Accurate 1

Active Member
A friend of mine has built a rather impressive mosquito r/c scale model from only a set of plans approx. 7ft wingspan with twin four strikes and working retracts. I'll upload a photo when I get a chance..
A1
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I have some pictures of one flyingI think at RIAT at Fairford some years ago. My favourite plane and I have made many air fix models of it.

I also have a tin model of what I assume was ment to be a Mosquito its a one of and got it in a box of junk at a sale, now has pride of place in my living room.

D
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
One of the benefits of living under base leg, just had two spits do a dirty dive & low pass along the airbus wings runway, gone off in the direction of Anglesey.
 

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