Describing your Fox lamping.

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
I'll probably get slated for this, but, I really would hope no one from the "Other side " looks in too often, when you, (no one in particular!), gets to the bit we all work for, The EYES!, The EYES!..................., not many describe the most important aspect of lamping safety!, the final correct identification of your quarry.:doh:
 

devonfoxer

Well-Known Member
hi we use an archer spotting scope its an archer grade A night vision unit with 3 lenses on the front and we can see clearly weather and conditions permitting up to 800 yrds at 400 we can tell the diffrence between a fox and a cat easily( honest it only ever happened once )and since we had this the farmers are getting to hear about it the safety aspect is amazing you can wait till charlie in right safe place to shoot lamp on dead charlie we have shown this unit to the farmers and the words spreading im now getting farmers ringing me asking if il go sort they problems out so money well spent cheers
 
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204 Ruger

Well-Known Member
I'll probably get slated for this, but, I really would hope no one from the "Other side " looks in too often, when you, (no one in particular!), gets to the bit we all work for, The EYES!, The EYES!..................., not many describe the most important aspect of lamping safety!, the final correct identification of your quarry.:doh:
Totally agree Steve....Remember this thread, the link still works to the article:

http://www.thestalkingdirectory.co.uk/showthread.php?14971-Night-hunter-shot-man-he-mistook-for-fox

I think about this everytime Is ee a set of EYES in the lamp...
 

aliS

Well-Known Member
I can't find a link but there was also a year or two back a father who shot his 11/12 year old son dead whilst out lamping.
 

devonfoxer

Well-Known Member
yes your right i have an idea this wasnt far from me raises other questions tho why when taking your kids out shooting at day or night wanst he stood right beside the person with the gun ??
 

Cougar

Well-Known Member
I can't find a link but there was also a year or two back a father who shot his 11/12 year old son dead whilst out lamping.
I still don't know how that happened. I've never thought I was in danger or endangering someone while out lamping.

Matt
 

re'M'ington

Well-Known Member
There is one thing for sure,and that is you will never get a pair of human eyes in the lamp,even if you were lamping a council estate.........Human eyes do not reflect!!! I do however realise the importance of the correct I.D,and always make sure 100%.

M
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
That particular event took place not far from me, I seem to remember the lad was wearing specs and the stepfather mistook them for fox's eyes. Clearly a tragic happening but as has already been said they should have stuck together. In fact they split into two groups, not a good idea.
There are only a few eyes that could be mistaken for fox; cat, sheep/lambs, badgers occasionally, cattle deer and horses are a bit high!. I use a Longbow NV scope and an Archer and with these there is no mistake.
As always, shooting at night has to be done with care, sadly not everyone realises this.
 

Triggermortis

Well-Known Member
There is one thing for sure,and that is you will never get a pair of human eyes in the lamp,even if you were lamping a council estate.........Human eyes do not reflect!!! I do however realise the importance of the correct I.D,and always make sure 100%.

M
With all due respect, how many humans have you lamped? i certainly have picked up "eye shine" from humans on several occasions(twice in the last 12 months),if human eyes do not reflect how is it that you get "red eye" from a camera flash? this is why i never use a scope mounted light to search any given area as by the time you realise through the scope that there is a person in front of you, the gun is already pointed at them, not a good sight to experiance through a scope!.
Anyone else seen human eyes reflect?

Tikkat3
 

dave1372

Well-Known Member
I would hope that it is common sense that you don't shoot at just a set of eyes, you need clear identification of the body for accurate shot placement. If you are shooting at just a set of eyes then you are plain asking for trouble!
Eye shine from foxes stands out a mile to that of humans as a foxes eyes are made up of rods only, unlike the human eye which has rods (which give contrast) and cones (which help identify colour). Behind the foxes eye is a light reflecting membrane which reflects light back into the rods which helps give foxes better vision in the dark. Colour of the eyes can often vary with age (usually pale green when cubs changing to bright orange for adults and the angle of the eyes of the light).
I haven't yet seen human eyes reflect from a distance that you could possibly mistake them as a fox. I have heard and do believe the stories where someone has been out carrying a small dog in their arms and people have lined them up in the sights before realising!
 

d foxxer

Well-Known Member
There is one thing for sure,and that is you will never get a pair of human eyes in the lamp,even if you were lamping a council estate.........Human eyes do not reflect!!! I do however realise the importance of the correct I.D,and always make sure 100%.

M
EXACTLY:thumb:
 

204 Ruger

Well-Known Member
There is one thing for sure,and that is you will never get a pair of human eyes in the lamp,even if you were lamping a council estate.........Human eyes do not reflect!!! I do however realise the importance of the correct I.D,and always make sure 100%.

M
Agree, however if you look at the post I out about the chap watching Owls with NV binos...There were a pair of human eyes behind the NV.
 

Rowey

Well-Known Member
I think most of the trouble is shooting beyond sensible ranges. A quality lamp/scope will clearly identify a fox in the right conditions up to around the 250 yd mark. Beyong that some guesswork comes in. A fox though through say a S&B 8x56 looks like a mouse at 300yds. Red mist makes for rash shots and costly mistakes. Just my opinion.
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
if human eyes do not reflect how is it that you get "red eye" from a camera flash?
I thought it was precisely because of the relative lack of reflection in humans, (compared to mammals with superior night vision), that 'red eye' occurred? Red eye may give the effect of reflection but it isn't the same. Reflection in nocturnal and night hunting animals is due to the presence of the 'tapetum lucidum', which improves low-light performance of the eye. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapetum_lucidum
 

d foxxer

Well-Known Member
i think i read somwhere about cones an rods in animals eyes more of one than the uther cant remember which way round

but that why they see better at night than us and lights reflect they eyes
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
That article in the guardian is very sad but....

he shot a standing man in the chest!
I am sorry but I am at a loss to imagine how a pair of NV binos looks like a fox's eyes?
or how a fox would be 4feet off the ground? standing upright!
or why a shooter would pull the trigger on a pair of eyes and hit 18-14" low unless he was AT BEST guessing where the bullet was going and what he was shooting at.
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
Certain animals particularly carnivores have a reflective layer behind the retina which enables them to use what light there is at night to better effect. We do not have this facility. The "eye shine" we see is the reflective layer or Tapetum Lucidum.
 
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Hornet 6

Well-Known Member
That article in the guardian is very sad but....

he shot a standing man in the chest!
I am sorry but I am at a loss to imagine how a pair of NV binos looks like a fox's eyes?
or how a fox would be 4feet off the ground? standing upright!
or why a shooter would pull the trigger on a pair of eyes and hit 18-14" low unless he was AT BEST guessing where the bullet was going and what he was shooting at.
Was the man standing, or was he prone ?

Neil. :)
 

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