DMQ Wild boar qualification

jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
It doesn't matter how many laws you put in place, some people will always break them. Adding more laws won't change that.
As I said before, boar are already protected by animal welfare legislation. I don't see the need for any further protection. Muntjac don't have a close season, and they seem to be steadily expanding their numbers.
It’s funny you should say that I’m reminded of a conversation I had with a trapper when living in northern Alberta we were talking about sound moderators and he expressed a worry that should they become legal in Alberta they would contribute to poaching , in my opinion if your going to break the law then that’s the kind of person you are , no amount of regulation will change that
 

levigsp

Well-Known Member
It doesn't matter how many laws you put in place, some people will always break them. Adding more laws won't change that.
As I said before, boar are already protected by animal welfare legislation. I don't see the need for any further protection. Muntjac don't have a close season, and they seem to be steadily expanding their numbers.
Look I don't know you from adam, but I have been hunting shooting and fishing for a very long time and I remember clearly how it was with deer before the various laws were made /updated etc. Yes some people will always brake the law, but MOST wont, they will not risk their tickets. If Wild boar are protected with similar laws to deer, they will be respected by most, if left asis they will be treated as vermin and things to take pot-shots at as is at the moment.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Look I don't know you from adam, but I have been hunting shooting and fishing for a very long time and I remember clearly how it was with deer before the various laws were made /updated etc. Yes some people will always brake the law, but MOST wont, they will not risk their tickets. If Wild boar are protected with similar laws to deer, they will be respected by most, if left asis they will be treated as vermin and things to take pot-shots at as is at the moment.
So why shouldn't feral boar be classified as vermin, with the same level of protection as all mammals get? They're an agricultural pest. Just because an animal is vermin doesn't mean it isn't respected. I have massive respect for rats, for example.

Or do you perhaps think that by elevating boar to a higher status there'll be more money to be made out of them?
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
I remember well when deer were classed as Vermin and treated as such. Why don't boar have a season? Our boar season is, Yearling, including piglets boar can be shot all year. Sows with dependent young can't be shot and male boar over year old have a closed season 15th feb - 16th April.
Yearling boar are the ones that need culling hard.
If boar are to be classed as vermin then why not Muntjac, an equally destructive invasive species.
The best way to get more boar and agricultural damage is the indiscriminate shooting of boar.
Boar are there to stay in the UK and not going away any time soon.
Whats are these feral boar people refer too? All the pictures I've seen on SD of shot boar look uncannily like boar. I've not seen one yet that look like a feral hog.
If it looks like a wild boar, Smells like a wild boar and will bite you on the arse like a wild boar guess what? Its a wild boar. But its the UK and why keep things simple when you can make something more complicated.
 

levigsp

Well-Known Member
No I don't think that, I couldn't care less how much money is made or not made. I do care about hunting ethics. And vermin is treated like **** in the uk. Animals gassed, poisoned, shot during breeding season and so on, its not acceptable to treat deer or boar like that in my book. You sound like a typical farmer that thinks anything that eats crops is vermin and should be destroyed. You say the same as all mammals get, well lets take rabbits, now at an official all time low, yet you still read of people shooting them with 22-250 and the like, just to watch them explode with no intention of picking them up, that's abhorrent. It is plain to see that we will never agree, because I respect all animal I hunt and think they all deserve protection to a degree, you think people should have a free for all on animals like boar.
 

Sharpie

Well-Known Member
No I don't think that, I couldn't care less how much money is made or not made. I do care about hunting ethics. And vermin is treated like **** in the uk. Animals gassed, poisoned, shot during breeding season and so on, its not acceptable to treat deer or boar like that in my book. You sound like a typical farmer that thinks anything that eats crops is vermin and should be destroyed. You say the same as all mammals get, well lets take rabbits, now at an official all time low, yet you still read of people shooting them with 22-250 and the like, just to watch them explode with no intention of picking them up, that's abhorrent. It is plain to see that we will never agree, because I respect all animal I hunt and think they all deserve protection to a degree, you think people should have a free for all on animals like boar.
Rabbits are at a low due to introduction of a nasty genetically modified disease developed in Australia. They will shrug it off eventually, as they do with mixy, but it takes a few years, and goes in cycles.

A nice rabbit, from my local game dealer, perfectly prepared, costs £3. Better that than supermarket cheap chicken.

If you live in France, or other places, they grow their own rabbits for consumption, as with fowl, buy them live at a market and you know that they are fresh.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
You sound like a typical farmer that thinks anything that eats crops is vermin and should be destroyed.
I guess you don't know many farmers. At least, not many like me.
levigsp said:
It is plain to see that we will never agree, because I respect all animal I hunt and think they all deserve protection to a degree, you think people should have a free for all on animals like boar.
But we do agree. All animals deserve protection, as we are both saying. They already have it. For example, anyone who were to shoot a boar with an inappropriate calibre could face prosecution for cruelty under current legislation, despite there being no "boar act" that specifies a legal minimum.
Is a close season neccesary for boar, or should it be left at the discretion of the hunter / landowner? It seems to work OK with muntjac so why not boar?
What I don't want to see is boar (that is, feral boar in the UK) placed beyond the reach of ordinary folk, to become yet another elitist shooting sport for the fortunate few. That's why I believe that the management of boar should remain in the hands of the people who are directly affected by their presence. Some may be glad to have them on their land, others won't, but it will all balance out in the end.
 

kes

Well-Known Member
Boar are a pest. There is a culling plan in place to stop the spread of boar or their proliferation.
Wild pigs in America are the number one farming pest and whilst I am not advocating helicopter hunts for them, I would like to think all shooters regard their quarry with respect, always trying to achieve a quick kill, preferably instantaneous if at all possible.
If most shooters are of the ethical type and we have the animal cruelty legislation as backup, who needs to be told how to shoot boar? Rifles - we all know the safety and ballistic aspects. Boar are usually Shot (or harvested if you prefer) at close quarters and with a large calibre, (270/308 as advised) . I just simply dont see how some money hungry 'trainer' is going to help me make a safer, cleaner kill. Extreme arrogance.
Doesnt everyone take a first in a species and learn very quickly ?
Damn - second comment.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Boar are usually Shot (or harvested if you prefer) at close quarters and with a large calibre, (270/308 as advised) .
Unfortunately not always so Kes.
The use of .223rem, .243win, and even .17hmr and .22lr is far from unheard of in certain quarters.

VSS I know that in some regions (Scotland in particular) the boar have long been legally regarded as simply feral pigs but that's simply not correct. Many of the boar in the Dean come from pure European wild boar stock that was deliberately released or escaped. Others were originally what is called iron age pigs, i.e. a Tamworth/ European Wild Boar cross.
 
Last edited:

jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately not always so Kes.
The use of .223rem, .243win, and even .17hmr and .22lr is far from unheard of in certain quarters.
I’ve skinned plenty of roe and muntjac out with .22 bullets in and even shotgun pellets , these are covered by the deer act but seems not to make a difference ........ still if the course makes money it’s worth it
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
VSS I know that in some regions (Scotland in particular) the boar have long been legally regarded as simply feral pigs but that's simply not correct. Many of the boar in the Dean come from pure European wild boar stock that was deliberately released or escaped. Others were originally what is called iron age pigs, i.e. a Tamworth/ European Wild Boar cross.
I have not described them as feral pigs. That's not what they are. They're feral boar, ie, the species known as "wild boar", but descended from escaped domestic stock.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I’ve skinned plenty of roe and muntjac out with .22 bullets in and even shotgun pellets , these are covered by the deer act but seems not to make a difference ........ still if the course makes money it’s worth it
Jimbo I'm not saying that the DMQ is correct, far from it. I think they are looking at it as a money maker.
What I am suggesting is that some form of legal protection of the boar is necessary, probably by amendment of the deer act perhaps.
 

jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
Jimbo I'm not saying that the DMQ is correct, far from it. I think they are looking at it as a money maker.
What I am suggesting is that some form of legal protection of the boar is necessary, probably by amendment of the deer act perhaps.
I think your right , nothing wrong with affording boar a measure of protection . However as I said before still plenty of people popping at deer with shotguns so it may not make much of a difference from a welfare point of view
As I’ve said before all courses are a money spinner this is no different
 

levigsp

Well-Known Member
I am not advocating courses and I said that from the start, but I do think they should be afforded the same protection as Deer, Proper calibre selection, No Night shooting, Seasons , Etc. It seems totally wrong to me that they should be covered by the same legislation as a rat or stoat.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
It seems totally wrong to me that they should be covered by the same legislation as a rat or stoat.
I cannot understand why this is wrong? What have they done to deserve greater protection than a rat or stoat?
(Incidentally, I would never kill a stoat. I think they're fascinating animals, and I love to see them about).
 
Last edited:

Top