Doe with antlers

bigscott270

Well-Known Member
Had the pleasure of inviting another sd member for a stalk to gain experience at the tail end of last year. He shot a doe and when inspecting the carcase we noticed she was growing antlers apart from that she was in prime condition and plenty of covering on her when dressed out. You can check the photos out in the write ups under geth
 

merlin

Well-Known Member
I shot a roe doe whilst out with Stone around 5 years ago that had small rudimentary antlers (...he was as surprised as I was!); apart from that, she was in fine fettle.

I didn't keep the skull at the time, and I've been kicking myself ever since.....doh!! (doe??!?!?)
 

Ranger22

Well-Known Member
Shot a few over the years, can't remember any of their female offspring having signs of antlers. Could it be one of those things that miss a generation?

Al
 

stecad

Well-Known Member
Shot one a few years ago. Pregnant when we gralloched her.
It's more a function of liver malfunction than a mutation. All mammalian females produce testosterone along with the female hormones (oestrogen). In females the testosterone is destroyed by the liver and oestrogen is always the controlling hormone. As the mammal ages and/or the liver function declines the testosterone levels rise relative to oestrogen. Male characteristics begin to appear. This is the same reason why old women grow facial hair.
Simple mammalian endocrine chemistry.
 

Hungry hunter

Well-Known Member
All mammalian females produce testosterone along with the female hormones (oestrogen). In females the testosterone is destroyed by the liver and oestrogen is always the controlling hormone. As the mammal ages and/or the liver function declines the testosterone levels rise relative to oestrogen. Male characteristics begin to appear. This is the same reason why old women grow facial hair.
Simple mammalian endocrine chemistry.
That could explain why my missus wears the trousers around here!
 

Run Old Stag.

Active Member
I've seen 3 in nearly 40 years and they all came from the same patch of ground over a 20 year period. Their horns were very small and light, very porous, with no colour, presumably because they're not behaving like bucks and fraying. I may be wrong but I feel that they're not casting these, I quite like the liver explanation, it makes sense.
 

whatwouldscoobydoo

Well-Known Member
Sh. All mammalian females produce testosterone along with the female hormones (oestrogen). In females the testosterone is destroyed by the liver and oestrogen is always the controlling hormone. As the mammal ages and/or the liver function declines the testosterone levels rise relative to oestrogen. Male characteristics begin to appear. This is the same reason why old women grow facial hair.
Simple mammalian endocrine chemistry.
Was going to try and say the same thing but you have worded that perfectly good effort!

The opposite tends to be more common but less noticable and is generally written off as just being the weak/whimpy one. In general genetic terms.
 

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