Dog taking deer down

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
It is indeed Keith, have a nice day
What tests have they normally passed by one year Wayne? Usually the dachshunds are just starting out at tests at that age and it can often take 3 years to achieve the array of tests such as Schussfestigkeitsprüfung, Spurlautprüfung, Schweissprüfung auf künstlicher Wundfährte, Vielseitigkeitsprüfung ohne Spurlaut, Stöbern im Jagdgebrauch Direkt Bauhund Natur (Fuchs). Dogs are usually at least 18 months before they achieve SchwhK/40.

Please excuse any inaccuracies in spelling.
 

plonker

Well-Known Member
Fantastic videos keith!
These teckels are really a tenacious little dog :thumb:
As the saying goes "it's not the size of the dog in the fight................................"
Keep them coming.
Atb Dave
 

Siggy

Well-Known Member
Wow!! In Germany the GWP is fully trained, tested and working by one year old.......That is incredible
It's also not generally true, they take the HZP the autumn after they were born but are not fully trained until they subsequently take the VGP, usually in the following autumn, but they can take it at any age.
 

jamross65

Well-Known Member
Dan I will coment on your last part, we are doing everything legal and with the police whilst carrying a firearm people can say what they think but there where those in a meeting that where told how things are from the legal point of view from the people who made the law, I will not comment any further on this here as it really is a waste of time. regards wayne.
The law was ‘made’ by the House Of Lords. It’s a statutory law hence the reference to ‘Act’. They WERE NOT present at your meeting. It was attended by laymen. Not one was a legal expert or qualified to advise on what you can or cannot do under this legislation and anyone who listens to you guys on this matter as it stands is as big an idiot for doing so as you are for claiming to know more than you do.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
I'll just put this last one up as the previous failed. As mentioned earlier, this is 'rousing and driving' training and the boar are more irritated than scared of the diminutive dogs but that doesn't detract the risk to the dogs - it is a hazardous occupation and they need their wits about them to avoid injury. Again Mihajlo's dogs from kennel Janior. It get's quite interesting at 2 minutes in the water.

 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
I'll just put this last one up as the previous failed. As mentioned earlier, this is 'rousing and driving' training and the boar are more irritated than scared of the diminutive dogs but that doesn't detract the risk to the dogs - it is a hazardous occupation and they need their wits about them to avoid injury. Again Mihajlo's dogs from kennel Janior. It get's quite interesting at 2 minutes in the water.

In fact from 1:30 to 2:0 you really get a feel for the courage and tenacity - they are giving this boar no quarter at all, no respite. Don't get me wrong, I don't have breed blindness, their over zealousness can be a right pain at times, but even when they are trying my patience I find I am stifling a smile of respect.
 
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Hudson12

Well-Known Member
I’d be pretty reluctant to do it tbh in this day and age with the way hunting with dogs is it isn’t worth the hassle you are guilty until proven innocent end of. I ran lurchers on deer in the past when it was legal and tbh a dog soon learns to tip them over at speed without damaging much but looking back was it humane no probably not would I do it agin definitely not.Reading further back on the comments without wanting to argue but I ran half cross bull greyhounds 45-50 kg dogs and they wouldn’t of taken a red stag not a prayer the things would just keep running with the poor dog hanging on like a tick
 

landkeeper

Well-Known Member
I’d be pretty reluctant to do it tbh in this day and age with the way hunting with dogs is it isn’t worth the hassle you are guilty until proven innocent end of. I ran lurchers on deer in the past when it was legal and tbh a dog soon learns to tip them over at speed without damaging much but looking back was it humane no probably not would I do it agin definitely not.Reading further back on the comments without wanting to argue but I ran half cross bull greyhounds 45-50 kg dogs and they wouldn’t of taken a red stag not a prayer the things would just keep running with the poor dog hanging on like a tick
Same round here be a good lurcher tackle a county meath red stag lol
 

cookingfat

Well-Known Member
So, I've seen in a few threads now dogs taking Injured deer down and baying, mostly by pointers. Is this a trait of the dog? Or is it trained in to them? Also, what's the biggest species of deer to let a dog after? Genuinely interested in this
There have been some interesting and valid comments made in this thread about the question you asked,
some of the comments have been very valid and some very negative,
Here is a film of how a trained dog can be of use when you have a really mobile deer.
this is a very mobile roe buck which had been shot in the front leg and without a dog that can track and be released to hold at bay it would have suffered,
this film was filmed by me while in Europe following a tracking team yesterday,
I was there with other members of UKDTR who where also with tracking teams following them and gaining more knowledge.
I have released my own hound while on tracks in the UK but as they say your always learning,
hope this little film helps you Hendrix rifles to understand a little more

cheers Tony

 

cookingfat

Well-Known Member

Here’s a picture of the wound
As you can see from the film the deer moving from left to right with the hound following was not hanging about


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hendrix's rifle

Well-Known Member
There have been some interesting and valid comments made in this thread about the question you asked,
some of the comments have been very valid and some very negative,
Here is a film of how a trained dog can be of use when you have a really mobile deer.
this is a very mobile roe buck which had been shot in the front leg and without a dog that can track and be released to hold at bay it would have suffered,
this film was filmed by me while in Europe following a tracking team yesterday,
I was there with other members of UKDTR who where also with tracking teams following them and gaining more knowledge.
I have released my own hound while on tracks in the UK but as they say your always learning,
hope this little film helps you Hendrix rifles to understand a little more

cheers Tony

Many thanks for the video, it shows a lot. I agree this thread took a turn, they do say that dogs bring out the worst in people however some of the experiences shared helps shed light on things along with the way people do it differently. Theres more than 1 way to skin a cat, as long as it's done it doesnt matter how you get there. Thanks again
 

tom

Well-Known Member
Thanks Tony interesting video ,
I myself have released my dog after a couple of mobile deer but on the whole I try to keep them on a lead unless I am sure of the place I am and I know my ground well ;
The reason which even in this part of Europe your video was filmed and I’m sure it is more remote and isolated than a lot of lowland Britain .Roads .
Point I am trying to make is it is very difficult to in my opinion let a dog track a very mobile deer in most of the uk apart from say Scotland because of our roads everywhere :
Even on that track it looked like you had to cross a road ,
My predecessor going back 30 years ago lost two dogs being hit on roads chasing roe bucks ; He was very old school and I’m sure his dogs would literally crack on till they found the deer .
The other issue I guess is boundaries? Genuine question how do you manage that in Britain ?
Thanks intresting thread .
 

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