Dremel Recommendations

JMikeyH

Well-Known Member
As above, looking to get a Dremel for under £100 if anyone has a recommendation for one, use will include work on stocks and such

Cheers
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
Brilliant little tools. Unless you absolutely must have portability or will be using above your head where cord could get in the way, I would avoid the cordless offerings. You get more power and no charging faff with the corded ones.

You also do not need to spend £100 to get what you need. Buy a basic model and spend more on the attachments you need.

I was using mine the other day to sharpen a stitching awl. There is always some job it can do. It was certainly a useful little tool to fit a gunsmith adapter neatly to a stock once.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
I purchased a Dremel copy at B&Q some 5 years ago for less than £30. It came as a kit with the all-important flexible drive. Something like this:

K
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
We burn out several dremels every year.... Main problem ist the first bearing with glass/carbon dust. We get the same life span out of cheap Lidl dremels as with more expensive makes. 135watt is the min one should get, 160 is better. For the rough stuff we use a 500 watt version with 6mm bits.
edi
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
Dremels are overpriced. I bought a cheap (less than £30, from AIMtools) Chinese Katsu straight die grinder with 6mm Jacobs chuck off eBay and it's been great. I think it's the 280w one. It is very good quality.
 

spandit

Well-Known Member
The Proxxon bits are pretty good, but I have so many from cheap sets that it doesn't really matter if they burn out quickly
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
I do own a Dremel (and find it useful) but I do feel slightly ashamed to possess such an abomination. Same goes for adjustable spanners: keep them well-hidden, along with your stash of porn...
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
I do own a Dremel (and find it useful) but I do feel slightly ashamed to possess such an abomination. Same goes for adjustable spanners: keep them well-hidden, along with your stash of porn...
It is embarrassing but they are so useful.

last night I chopped a half inch piece of seasoned hazel off a stick, screwed a wood screw in to it, use the dremel to cut the screw head off so that the little handmade tool could then be mounted in to the dremel. I then turned the dremel on and used a piece of sandpaper to cut a grove in the circumference of the hazel as it spun round and now have an automated leather edge burnisher.

Miss Cottis is very happy with her new glasses case and I was very happy with the slicked burnished edge of the leather. Mmmm, cognac horween leather and naked assembly (I was wearing shorts really)


 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
It is embarrassing but they are so useful.

last night I chopped a half inch piece of seasoned hazel off a stick, screwed a wood screw in to it, use the dremel to cut the screw head off so that the little handmade tool could then be mounted in to the dremel. I then turned the dremel on and used a piece of sandpaper to cut a grove in the circumference of the hazel as it spun round and now have an automated leather edge burnisher.

Miss Cottis is very happy with her new glasses case and I was very happy with the slicked burnished edge of the leather. Mmmm, cognac horween leather and naked assembly (I was wearing shorts really)


I burnish leather-edges by hand, using the jawbone of a roebuck...
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
I used to buy Dentice Hand drills/ as they run like silk and water cooled if needed the speed they run , a rubber cutting wheel will cut chrome
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I have a Draper version which is excellent. I also have a pin chuck which will take impossibly tiny drill bits and it works well but has to be very fast. A tip I heard was that PCB board drills are very useful.

D
 

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