DSC1 Shooting test - Air rifle practice

#1
Hi All,

I have just booked my DSC1 for March.

I currently have an air rifle and was wondering if I could practice for my shooting test using this?

I was thinking of getting some shooting sticks and having a go at standing shots.

Was wondering what a comparable test would be with a .177 12 ft/lb Air Rifle.

If I have understood correctly for DSC1 it is :

1) 3 shots, 4 Inch group, 100m
2) Deer Target, shots in 6-inch correct kill area, 2 shots from 100m prone, 2 shots from 70m sitting/kneeling and 2 shots from 40m off sticks standing.

Any advice.guidance much appreciated.

Thanks
 
#4
Hi All,

I have just booked my DSC1 for March.

I currently have an air rifle and was wondering if I could practice for my shooting test using this?

I was thinking of getting some shooting sticks and having a go at standing shots.

Was wondering what a comparable test would be with a .177 12 ft/lb Air Rifle.

If I have understood correctly for DSC1 it is :

1) 3 shots, 4 Inch group, 100m
2) Deer Target, shots in 6-inch correct kill area, 2 shots from 100m prone, 2 shots from 70m sitting/kneeling and 2 shots from 40m off sticks standing.

Any advice.guidance much appreciated.

Thanks
Good idea, depending on your air rifle you could try 50 yards prone, 35 kneeling and 25 or so off sticks? Once your happy with it yet stretching the kneeling and standing a little bit further
 

Basil H

Well-Known Member
#5
I did just this. The range and target are not that important. One important thing is to work out, and become fluent and confident with your chosen sitting/kneeling position.
The other is to get used (if possible) to the sticks that you will use - deploying them and getting comfortable.
It will not matter then whether you are handed a Blaser or a battered BSA as you will be successful for it isn't really a difficult task.
 

JohnT

Well-Known Member
#6
Since our club only accesses a full bore range once a month, and then not the required ranges, I practiced with my air rifle as you suggest. It allowed me to get used to sticks and sight pictures. As far as targets are concerned, it is not unreasonable to simply use a 1"circle. I used ranges of 50, 40 & 30yds simply because our outdoor FT range is 50yds.
There was no correlation of the target size and ranges, they simply provided an aiming mark (and, lets be honest, if you can't hit a 1"circle at those ranges you need all the practice you can get :D ). The main aim of the process was to get me comfortable with the routine and used to shooting sticks, two less things to think about on the day. It worked for me.

HTH
 

Basil H

Well-Known Member
#7
Absolutely. I was little inconsiderate above as I have several acres to play in but did not consider that some might have a small suburban garden.
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
#8
I scaled the DSC1 zero target down to 25% size & practiced @ 25 yards with an air rifle. If it won't alarm your neighbours you could also practice dry firing your rifle and just try to get into comfortable positions with little or no apparent movement when you pull the trigger.
 

Yorric

Well-Known Member
#9
I scaled the DSC1 zero target down to 25% size & practiced @ 25 yards with an air rifle. If it won't alarm your neighbours you could also practice dry firing your rifle and just try to get into comfortable positions with little or no apparent movement when you pull the trigger.
Plus 1 on Tim's post. I'd add PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

Remember that the biggest obstacle to passing the test is your brain. --- More people fail do so because they get stressed & can't shoot well on the day - even if they have previous experience! - Put yourself under pressure whilst practicing to help yourself learn to control it. - Maybe challenge a friend & shoot for beer tokens. :lol:

Ian
 
#10
Thanks everyone for your advice.

I will def get lots of practice in and can shoot out to about 50m with the air rifle in my garden.

Thanks Tim - I will def get hold of the targets and try scaling them down, great idea.

As said I think it is about the practice until it becomes muscle memory.

Cheer :)
 
#11
Tim,
You definitely don't want 50metres target practice with an air rifle for deer shooting, imho. Go maximum 35 meters and just practice. I've got my DSC1 coming up in Feb and that's what I'm doing, although I do a lot of hunting with 177 anyway.
 

JohnT

Well-Known Member
#13
Tim,
You definitely don't want 50metres target practice with an air rifle for deer shooting, imho. Go maximum 35 meters and just practice. I've got my DSC1 coming up in Feb and that's what I'm doing, although I do a lot of hunting with 177 anyway.
I don't understand why you advocate not shooting at 50yds. In reality the range does not matter, it is repetitive practice with sticks, etc. that is required to embed the course of fire and the physical situations so that they are as familiar as possible on the day when you feel most pressurised giving you less to think about.
 
#15
Air rifle practice, especially as modern air rifle 'scopes have a similar reticule to may 'scopes fitted on our stalking rifles is always good practice. In fact (with suitable snap caps) even practice with your actual stalking rifle is also useful as BOTH develop muscle memory especially on standing, kneeling and off sticks shooting positions.

The other benefit of an air rifle is that it has a longer dwell time. That is the shot takes longer to exit the barrel so it reveals any fault you might have in trigger technique and/or follow through that might not be as evident with a rifle firing its projectile at a greater velocity.

On the internet there are mathematic calculations for making a reduced scale target. So that if shooting it at twenty-five yards it looks the same (to naked eye or through a 'scope) as it would at one hundred yard. But a start might be to divide the relevant dimensions by four.

True size of target (in cms) divided by true distance it would be away (in cms) then that sum multiplied by the distance you now want to shoot it at (in cms). So a one foot high target usually shot at 100 metres you want to shoot at twenty-five metres would be 30 divided by 10000 multiplied by 2500. Equals 7.5 cms or thereabouts.

The only problem with fifty yard air rifle shooting is that wind can affect the pellet. So fifty yards in a barn would be OK but fifty yards in the open on a windy day might not be as useful.
 
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roryh

Well-Known Member
#16
Marksmanship is marksmanship regardless of weapon the principles are the same.

Enjoy your practice and become confident in your skills so that the day does not become a case of you over pressuring yourself.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#17
Keep it simple and reduce everything to 1/4 scale.
So,
1. 3 shots prone inside a 1" target at 25m
2. 2 shots prone at a 1/4 size deer silhouette target
3. 2 shots either kneeling or sitting supported at 17.5m at the deer target
4. 2 shots standing supported at 10m at the deer target.

Of all of these though, make sure you are comfortable with No. 3 which is the cause of most problems on the shooting test!!!
Good luck!
MS
 

Vulpesvulpes

Well-Known Member
#18
50% of failures are on the shooting test usually by those who think they only have to turn up on the day as they have been shooting for years and know it all
Some say shooting is all about luck but the more you practice the luckier you"ll get.
 

Dan Newcombe

Well-Known Member
#19
MS has it spot on, make sure that the targets are small enough though so that you are shooting better than the test requires and particularly the sitting one is problematic. Make use of the aids, a long bi pod makes the sitting bit a doddle

The shooting test really shouldn't trip anyone up who has experience using a rifle, 4 and 6 inch is not really testing and nerves seem to be the killer but remember that everyone there wants you to pass so there is no real need for nerves.
 

bowji john

Well-Known Member
#20
The other benefit of an air rifle is that it has a longer dwell time. That is the shot takes longer to exit the barrel so it reveals any fault you might have in trigger technique and/or follow through that might not be as evident with a rifle firing its projectile at a greater velocity.
Every day is a school day :tiphat:
 

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