DSC1 shooting test

Tungsten

New Member
Just been out to the range to practice for the shootin test, never having to shoot seated or off sticks, but shooting regularly at 300 yards off a fixed bipod.

1. don't think I am going to have a problem off the sticks at 40m as I grouped them in touching holes almost.
2. Shouldn't have a problem at 100m, although the question here is can I use my fixed bipod for 100m and detach it for the seated and stick shots?
3. Seated!! although I was able to keep all shots within 6.25" dia target this was the one I was most uncomfortable with as I did not have an aid to steady the shot, as my fixed bipod is too small and my sticks are fixed for standing height. Any tips for this one?
 

Dovebob

Well-Known Member
Tungsten,

When I did my test I shot off a bag while lying down, off short sticks while sitting and off long sticks while standing.

The sticks I used were plastic garden canes held together with the flexible plastic bit that goes over the udder on a milking machine. The short sticks were just shorter canes.

I am a novice but found the sitting position ok as I could get a solid lock between my arms, knees and the sticks.

Hope this helps.

Dovebob
 
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Mannlicher_Stu

Well-Known Member
Just been out to the range to practice for the shootin test, never having to shoot seated or off sticks, but shooting regularly at 300 yards off a fixed bipod.

1. don't think I am going to have a problem off the sticks at 40m as I grouped them in touching holes almost.
2. Shouldn't have a problem at 100m, although the question here is can I use my fixed bipod for 100m and detach it for the seated and stick shots?
3. Seated!! although I was able to keep all shots within 6.25" dia target this was the one I was most uncomfortable with as I did not have an aid to steady the shot, as my fixed bipod is too small and my sticks are fixed for standing height. Any tips for this one?

You can use any aid that you would use in the field whilst stalking is a quick answer to that one for any of the disciplines, that includes your roe sack ( anything you would normally carry with you) I was once told someone turned up with some bench rest gear and was told to put it back in the car:D

When I did mine I used 2ft.6" splay sticks at 100 mts sat instead of prone
I used them again at the shorter distance sat and I used 6ft splay sticks with a trailing foot rope making it a tripod standing
 
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Harry mac

Well-Known Member
Get yourself 2x garden canes from B&Q or Homebase. The steel type coated in green plastic. Cut them to about 5'5" and join them together with a bridle stop, available from any tack supplier or sadlery for litterally pennies. If you need to set the sticks for a kneeling or sitting shot just roll the bridle stop down the sticks to the appropriate height and you're good to go.
As far as removing the bi-pod mid test goes, I don't think there's anything in the rules that says you can't, so just do it. If anybody says anything just act dumb;)
 

Big Stu

Well-Known Member
Try putting your sticks angled well out in front of you and rest the stock on one knee, I'm sure your assessor will not have a problem with you removing your bipod,
when i did mine we were on a bank for the sitting shots so could use sticks at full height
just relax and take your time
 

Pippa

Well-Known Member
When I did my test I had to borrow a rifle and all the kit on the range day, as I had no rifle or equipment of my own at the time. For the seated/kneeling shot, I was instructed to use the 6ft sticks (garden canes), holding them upright in a closed position in my left hand (as if it was a single stick), resting the rifle against the sticks on my left hand, using my left thumb to steady/grip the stock. This worked fine for me.

Pippa
 

The Mole

Well-Known Member
An alternative to what Pippa says is to open the double sticks and grip halfway down the left hand one with your fingers and use the thumb to rest the rifle fore end on. Thats if you are right handed, just reverse if left handed. Its also a quick and easy way of shooting off the sticks if you are stalking for real rather than on the ranges.

Simples!
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Nothing to stop you from removing the bipod on the test, I would use the garden canes, as Harry suggested but get three rather than two two the length Harry suggested cut approx. 6 from inch's of the top of one cane and drill a small hole near the top
drill a similar hole in the other two 6 inch's from the tops , get small strip of leather about 2 inch's long and drill hole in either end

Attach one end of leather strip with small bolt and nut to the short cane, bolt and nut through other end of leather strip then through both holes in the longer canes,make sure the two canes can swivel when you tighten this one up.

You now have a tripod that can be used for sitting, kneeling or standing, always keep the shorter leg to the front, for height adjustment just move the legs further apart, this makes a very stable shooting base.

Personally I prefer this arrangement to bought shooting sticks, as they are much quicker to set up , no leg adjustment to fiddle with just move the legs further apart till you get the right height and level, the down side the legs cant be retracted like bought sticks when walking.

Should cost no more than £10 to make
 

mickjgardner

Well-Known Member
when i did my level 1 test i was told i could either have bipod on or off but was not allowed to take it off during the test so i shot at 100 off bipod then rest off sticks with bipod still on.I too ,felt awkard on sitting as not a shot i ever really take,may well be worth practising that one
 

Ewich

Well-Known Member
Tungsten,

When I did the Level 1 shooting test I used a set-up similar to the one Harry Mac suggests but used three of the green plastic coated garden canes held together with a 1.5" wide piece of push bike inner tube which you slip over the end and roll down until you have the position you want the legs to splay out from - this will allow you to position yourself for the kneeling / sitting shots to suit.

I prefer sitting as this is a more stable position - if you cross your legs in front and keep your feet as close to your body as is comfortable you can rest your elbows in the inside of your knees which gives maximum stability for the shot. Remember to either use your hand to hold the canes at the intesection point and lay your rifle on your hand or put something soft into the intersection to keep the rifle from resting directly on the canes as this may change your point of impact slightly - may not be critical at 70 yds anyway given the target area!

I would keep your bipod on but make sure that when you have your rifle on the canes that the bipod is in front of the canes and as close to the canes as possible without snagging on them.

With a bit of practice before the test and you will be quids in.

Best of luck.
 

jimbo123p

Well-Known Member
I was told sitting or kneeling for the 70 m shot, Remember it is test to hit a target in a manner that you would use in the field. Ewich obviously does not have a 60 year old abused back. If I got in that position you would need a crane to lift me.
 

Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
3 shots 100m zero grouping is easiest done off bipod with rucksack or slip rolled up under the butt ensures tight grouping
2 shots 100m deer target same as zero prone setup aim middle of the front leg and half way up body
2 shots 70m is kneeling or sitting and if your able sitting off sticks or long leg bipod is very stable
2 shots 40m standing off sticks

you can use any equipment you would usually carry when stalking ie. rucksack or slip rolled up under the butt for 100m zero. Usually assessors or other candidates would lend you sticks or bipod if you didn't have.
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
Speaking in general terms I think that the shooting test is one of the most difficult aspects of the DSC1 for those people who don't have their own land and who may have no chance to practise in any position other than prone. I know that some organisatons run a "range day" in advance of the DSC test and it has to be worthwhile to do this if you can. The first time I ever shot off sticks was on my DSC1 test, until then it had always been prone off a bipod except for one deer I shot off a rock. In advance of the test I did some dry firing practise off sticks to get a feel for what was most steady and I think that was most useful. In the end I passed with no problems. As others have said make yourself some suitable sticks, I borrowed some on the day but on reflection it was a risky enterprise to assume I could do that and each DSC test seems to have its own set of standards so best to take your own, and I would suggest some safe dry firing if you can manage it.
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
Been trawling through old threads, trying to find the size of the dsc1 deer target. I have the course notes and am doing the test at the end of the month, I was going to have a wee practise and I don't know the size of the group required? Can't find it in the notes, I'm sure someone knows...

Thanks in advance.
 

Shabz

Well-Known Member
Been trawling through old threads, trying to find the size of the dsc1 deer target. I have the course notes and am doing the test at the end of the month, I was going to have a wee practise and I don't know the size of the group required? Can't find it in the notes, I'm sure someone knows...

Thanks in advance.

Did mine a week or so ago, the zero target is about 4inch circle and the deer targets have a 6 1/4 inch oval type job on them. You can download the zero target at the DMQ website.
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
Thanks, I knew I'd get a quick reply. Doesn't sound too difficult then... Famous last words LOL.
 

Shabz

Well-Known Member
Don't think so? I'm sure you could shoot it all freehand if you wanted to! Wouldn't recommend it though!
 
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