fallow with bad limp

Jason308250

Well-Known Member
out stalking last week and a friend shot this fallow buck with a bad limp.we decided that this one was not in a good way and would be a good one to take.rob took the shot at 150 yards and the buck dropped.we walked down and inspected the leg and found this.


IMG_0730.jpgIMG_0717.jpgthe rear leg had slight muscle deteriation so must have been struggling for a while
 

longlowdog

Well-Known Member
Although it is not possible to tell exactly from the picture it looks like Strawberry Foot Rot as found in sheep. It is an extremely painful condition. I don't think the carcass would be tainted as it is a growth following a localised infection. Greater minds than mine may have more knowledge on the subject.
 

highland stalker

Well-Known Member
+1 for foot rot. If it was summer time it most probably would have been crawling with maggots. Better off culled to prevent the spread of the rot to other beasts.
 

montyarrow

Active Member
I was talking to my vet about this in sheep, funnily enough I said I hadn't seen in it the fallow deer coming in. Is it seen much?
 

Jason308250

Well-Known Member
highland stalker first time i have ever seen this,it was a good one to take out if it can spread,longlowdog is that the propper name for the condition,
 

longlowdog

Well-Known Member
A google of 'strawberry foot rot' will throw up tons of stuff. It is certainly known throughout the sheep industry in the U.K as such.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
This is more typical of true foot-rot although….the small red growth looks like granulation tissue that occurs when feet sheep are trimmed too much - and are called strawberries (round here at least). True Strawberry foot rot is found around the top of the hoof and relates to Orf (viral) or dermatophilus (bacterial) infection. Foot rot isn't that common in deer so this might be a result of other damage to the foot such as a thorn or a broken hoof. Pure speculation on my part I have to confess, but the other claw isn't in great shape.
 

highland stalker

Well-Known Member
I have never seen it in deer before myself. Not a lot of fallow up here though. It is very common in sheep farming and can be treated quite effectively these days but in most cases repeat offenders of it are understandably culled to improve stock quality. It can spread quite quickly through a flock of sheep which will result in multiple lameness.
As Buchan quite rightly says it is most likely that the beast already had a problem with its hoof which allowed the rot to get in. Is there sheep in the area where you shot the buck? Keep an eye open and see if you can spot any lameness in them just out of interest.

I am sure there are some folk on here who will certainly know a bit more about it than myself.

Cheers,
 

longlowdog

Well-Known Member
Looking for a lame sheep in a group is pretty much the same as looking for wool on a sheep, result almost certain to be affirmative...... mind you, I wouldn't get most of my work if it wasn't for lame sheep.
 

Jason308250

Well-Known Member
Highland stalker the sheep were moved off the ground 2 months ago but others are around the surrounding area the hoof looked hollow around the red raw area.my mate said he has seen this before in sheep but not in deer.its a new one for me,it looked painfull have not seen any of the others limping so hopefully it has not spread too far
 

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