Fawn Mummification

Cougar

Well-Known Member
A friend shot a fallow doe a couple of years ago and inside was this fawn that was starting to mummify. Has anyone else come across this?

deer 003.jpgdeer 004.jpgdeer 006.jpg
 

k&a

Well-Known Member
Yes i have shot deer with calcified fawns but they didn't look like your images. Mine were a solid mass, your images look more like it has died and started to decompose. Out of interest, what time of year was the deer shot?
 

Cougar

Well-Known Member
My friend shot it on the 23/12/07. I'd never seen it before but he had quite a few times and said it would turn solid in the end. But I do agree with you there that it does look more like its decomposing.
 

stalker.308

Well-Known Member
Never seen it before. What condition was the doe in? And would you enter the doe into the food chain or not?
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
Difficult to answer. If it is truly mummified - almost dried out and leathery, I'd say yes. If it looks like it is decomposing and smells then probably no. You'd have to consider the behaviour of the doe and the condition of the rest of the carcass.
 

adjman

Well-Known Member
This question actually comes up in the DSC1 manual - they recommend incineration of the doe carcass as there is no way to know if blood poisoning has occurred in the doe carrying the dead foetus, therefore it is unfit for human consumption.
 

Apache

Well-Known Member
This question actually comes up in the DSC1 manual - they recommend incineration of the doe carcass as there is no way to know if blood poisoning has occurred in the doe carrying the dead foetus, therefore it is unfit for human consumption.
It does but I think the answer is wrong and on the DSC 1 feedback sheet I told them so!

If there is no associated peritonitis, local nodes ok and the carcase sets then I would eat it. Obviously if lots of local reaction then I wouldn't. I've sent plenty of cows to slaughter containing mummies and they have all passed meat inspection.
 

Triggermortis

Well-Known Member
It does but I think the answer is wrong and on the DSC 1 feedback sheet I told them so!

If there is no associated peritonitis, local nodes ok and the carcase sets then I would eat it. Obviously if lots of local reaction then I wouldn't. I've sent plenty of cows to slaughter containing mummies and they have all passed meat inspection.
+1, I was on a cull last year when one of the lads shot a sika hind with one in,god it dont half pong if you split it open! apparently it's not that common so i was lucky to see one especially as i'm due to do my DSC1 next month, i think its all very well buying all the books, educational dvd's etc but there is no substute for actually seeing these rarities for yourself, come to that i think that anyone looking to take their DSC1 should try and get experiance gralloching etc beforehand if possible.

Tikkat3
 

adjman

Well-Known Member
come to that i think that anyone looking to take their DSC1 should try and get experiance gralloching etc beforehand if possible.

Tikkat3
Heartily agree, I have thoroughly enjoyed learning all the stuff for DSC1 but am very well aware that it is JUST the theory and very often experience can tell you a LOT more :) Interesting points about the foetus, I think the manual may well be being careful and it does say in there "there MAY be a possibility of blood poisoning from the foetus" and I think they are going with the safest bet of destroying it just in case - obviously someone who really knows their stuff and can check the rest of the carcass for signs would be able to clear it without any problems, but for the novice it's probably safer it is destroyed just in case.
 

nell

Well-Known Member
Quite common in sheep and always see several at lambing time. like Buchan i have seen many in the meat works and cant recall a carcase being condemed....
 

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