Fieldsports Britain driven muntjac

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
#21
It seems to make a lot of sense to me. If there is a problem in a particular area then why not. As some have pointed out, this is the norm in a lot of places and it can be effective. It's also normal here to shoot driven Roe with a shot gun. Albeit at close range, less than 20m.
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
#22
I saw on a DVD that the Swiss do do driven days on roe deer with shotguns.
In Germany though it is illegal as you must use a minimum calibre. It is very heavily frowned on, if on a boar drive a deer is shot, due to the green mush that mostly is found inside as most shooters will hit too far back.
I would have to give a munti the the same respect as any other deer that I am about to shoot.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
#23
What do's it matter if its an effective way of culling Muntjac? How about it could be fun and you spend a day hunting and socializing with mates. Or is hunting, stalking only OK if you don't have any fun doing it.
Shooting roe with a shotgun and teckle is great sport and a common hunting form in Scandinavia. I'll try not to smile next time I'm hunting roe like that .
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
#24
Not one for 'you tubing' myself I'm afraid but I can assure you that, even with my limited experience, if I couldn't get more than three deer, of any species, in twelve man/days on any ground that i've ever stalked i'd be looking for a new job/hobby. Sorry but to dress this up as 'Management' when it is clearly just a sensationalist jolly is frankly ridiculous.
Okay dokey.
However with no video evidence of your ability in any situation its all conjecture.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#25
Driving muntjac to waiting guns is a very bad idea on deer welfare grounds! As well as the wounding aspect, muntjac does can give birth at ANY month of the year! It is down to the stalker to assess whether or not a doe has a dependant fawn. How would you assess that with a doe running at full speed with a new-born fawn tucked up nearby in the undergrowth. Would some of you even care? Clearly not by some of the posts above.
As Glyn said, muntjac are not too difficult to shoot by traditional methods either. My personal record is 9 muntjac and 2 roe does all foot stalked on one sunny afternoon in the winter. I don't have a video of that either so it is once again conjecture.:rolleyes:
MS
 

Greener Jim

Well-Known Member
#26
What do's it matter if its an effective way of culling Muntjac? How about it could be fun and you spend a day hunting and socializing with mates. Or is hunting, stalking only OK if you don't have any fun doing it.
Shooting roe with a shotgun and teckle is great sport and a common hunting form in Scandinavia. I'll try not to smile next time I'm hunting roe like that .
Oh no one can't enjoy it :D
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
#27
Yep all conjecture. And self praise is no recom
Driving muntjac to waiting guns is a very bad idea on deer welfare grounds! As well as the wounding aspect, muntjac does can give birth at ANY month of the year! It is down to the stalker to assess whether or not a doe has a dependant fawn. How would you assess that with a doe running at full speed with a new-born fawn tucked up nearby in the undergrowth. Would some of you even care? Clearly not by some of the posts above.
As Glyn said, muntjac are not too difficult to shoot by traditional methods either. My personal record is 9 muntjac and 2 roe does all foot stalked on one sunny afternoon in the winter. I don't have a video of that either so it is once again conjecture.:rolleyes:
MS
Yes all conjecture. And self praise is no recommendation.
 

Uncle f

Well-Known Member
#30
Well this has opened up the can of worms I thought it would. Having had a simple email back From fieldsports Britain saying it was controversial and that the estate cancelled a day prior as it got nervous it’s clear that we all have different ideas as to what is acceptable and what is over the mark. However my feelings are clear and to echo MS post with regards to the welfare of potential young muntjac then this was not an ideal piece. I did enquire as to how many animals were wounded and not found and I’m stall waiting on a reply. This was I’ll thought out and not staffed property in my opinion and all it showed was a potential selling point of aimpoint red dots. This group are also a large sponsor of fieldsports Britain coincidense? Some are for and some are against I completely appreciate that and value all persons input on this
 

billh

Well-Known Member
#31
This country is a lot smaller and has a lot more constricted shooting areas than than continental Europe, lots more wanderers around the woods, with or without the right to do so.
There are enough serious injuries/deaths on the continent when shooting running animals why do we need it here where the possibility of injury or death is much greater.
Would you like to have a death or serious injury hanging over you for the rest of your life just because you thought driven ground animals was a good idea for you?
When the first person is injured/killed by what can only be described for this country as a relatively dangerous practice what is going to happen to the person who pulled the trigger?
What are the objectors to shooting going to make of it?
What calibre rifles/shotgun to be used?
What size of bullet/shot is going to be whistling around the country side without any great knowledge of whats behind the target?
Its bad enough being a beater or picker-up on game shoot days when relatively small shot is used.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#33
Once again we see people that are happy to shoot deer for their own benefit (ie, because it's good fun!) with little or no regard to the welfare of the deer themselves. I am also horrified to see that there are people that would shoot large heavy and relatively slow calibres at running targets that may be as small as 7kg in the UK countryside amongst other shooters, beaters, dogs, etc. The safety mind-set of some people on here is extremely worrying at times!:(
MS
 
#34
Have to agree with others on here, you can hardly call it effective management, can see it being effective on boar, but certainly not on munties , I no of a shoot that use shot guns on them ,under the excuse of crop protection, quite effective on control , but a lot get away injured only to die a day or two later, certainly not for me
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
#36
Have to agree with others on here, you can hardly call it effective management, can see it being effective on boar, but certainly not on munties , I no of a shoot that use shot guns on them ,under the excuse of crop protection, quite effective on control , but a lot get away injured only to die a day or two later, certainly not for me
Im having trouble with my interpretation here. Either its effective or not effective method of controlling numbers.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#39
Im having trouble with my interpretation here. Either its effective or not effective method of controlling numbers.
Of course it is effective, especially if you are killing young deer that you haven't even seen! But is it ethical, or as effective as traditional methods? Clearly not!
MS
 

Glyn 1

Well-Known Member
#40
Have to agree with others on here, you can hardly call it effective management, can see it being effective on boar, but certainly not on munties , I no of a shoot that use shot guns on them ,under the excuse of crop protection, quite effective on control , but a lot get away injured only to die a day or two later, certainly not for me
Yes, two very well know Estates not too far from me still did big muntjac shotgun drive days up to at least a couple of years ago when I lost touch. I suspect one will have stopped now as they have a new Head Keeper but I doubt very much if the other one has. I suspect that there are many more in this area too.
 

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