Finding a starting load

tuck1

Well-Known Member
Morning all

Next silly question on my novice reloading journey if I may?

I've assembled all the necessary components, and I know the previous owner of my rifle had good success with 75g HP. However, I've subsequently found that my Lee manual doesn't list N140 with this projectile. It does list n140 for 70 grain, and also for 77 grain, and the dipper size is different 2.8 vs 2.5. The Viht website is the same.

Is there an accepted way for me to calculate a starting load? Or I am just interpreting the manual incorrectly? (I have borrowed a set of scales so I can use them if required whilst I get the volumes correct.) For info, the suggested start for powder for 70 g bullets is 41.0, and for 77 gr bullets 34.4, so a considerable difference.

Thanks in advance
 

bluesako

Well-Known Member
hi tuck what calibre? sounds like a 243, viht 140 will do, but dont use them lee dippers, get a set of scales i use 43 gr,s of 140 with a 68 gr berger in my 243, i have 2 mint rcbs 505 scales for sale bs
 

tuck1

Well-Known Member
Hi
Yep, .243. I should have been a bit clearer what I'm trying to achieve really.
I haven't used the rifle much for the last few years and my technique has really suffered. I'm not shooting deer or chasing any particular velocity. I'm just wanting to produce some consistent cartridges to get some practice in, without a trip to the RFD each time I fancy it, low volume and low cost. The idea of volumetric powder measures really appeal, and I know quite a few people on here have had considerable success with the method, but in the interest of safety, and learning the trade properly, I've borrowed some scales to double check my work whilst I get underway. The problem I'm having is finding a specified start load for these particular weight of projectiles, with N140. I wondered if it was an anomaly of my manual, (it's the 2013 edition) or some other reason?

Cheers
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
Start at 35grains and work up towards high 30's watching for pressure. 0.4-0.5grain increments will be fine and you are right to use scales when working up a load. Once you have found your optimum charge weight, you can figure out which dipper and what technique will work to get you real close to your charge weight. Assuming you find the correct node, you can make proper good accurate ammo with those dippers if used and understood correctly.

I will have a quick look to see if I can find something more concrete, as I did once reload with 140 but now use 160 and heavier bullets. You will be fine starting at 35 and working up though. I recall the cases being slightly emptier than I prefer. I suppose it on the cusp of 160 being more suitable but without looking properly I cannot recall.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
My apologies, .243.
No need whatsoever as far as I'm concerned :)

As for the Lee measures? I've not used mine, but I know of many who do, and to good effect. I'm a bit anal when reloading, and like to get my charge weights absolutely spot on. I've been told in the past though, that for hunting even a variance of half a grain between loads will make virtually no difference, and I'm perfectly prepared to accept that. The lee measures work on volume, and if used correctly (tamped-down, and scooped straight from the tub, if I recall?) are pretty accurate from what I've been told
 

Border

Well-Known Member
No need whatsoever as far as I'm concerned :)

As for the Lee measures? I've not used mine, but I know of many who do, and to good effect. I'm a bit anal when reloading, and like to get my charge weights absolutely spot on. I've been told in the past though, that for hunting even a variance of half a grain between loads will make virtually no difference, and I'm perfectly prepared to accept that. The lee measures work on volume, and if used correctly (tamped-down, and scooped straight from the tub, if I recall?) are pretty accurate from what I've been told
I use the Lee powder scoops to get near the desired charge and then trickle the rest.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
I really encourage you to buy some scales. I know you don't need them (factories load by volume, as do many hand-loaders) but it will make the reloading process so much more rewarding.

Kind regards,

Carl
 

tuck1

Well-Known Member
Excellent stuff, thanks everyone. I do have access to scales should I need them, however at the moment I’m looking forward to the simplicity, and portability, and the prospect of knocking up a few rounds on the back of the pickup whilst having a brew is very appealing.
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
Excellent stuff, thanks everyone. I do have access to scales should I need them, however at the moment I’m looking forward to the simplicity, and portability, and the prospect of knocking up a few rounds on the back of the pickup whilst having a brew is very appealing.
If you’re going to use dippers you need a consistent technique. You don’t tamp down as stated in an earlier post. You fill then knock off the excess with a straight edge.
However I will add to the others who have said get some scales.
For example I have two powders which it is claimed are the same. Data is verbatim from each manufacturer. So as part of my tests to confirm I was weighing the two. To see if the weight to volume also matched.
I struggled to get consistent weights of each in the scoop. With half a grain difference in a 3.2 cc scoop (iirc) over quite a few goes.
Don’t get me wrong I do load by volume, but I use either a Lee perfect measure or a RCBS one. Depending on what I happen to be loading.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I find N140 Is excellent for both 75 and 87 v max in my Howa. You need scales and a set of Lee ones are just fine as is a Lee powder thrower.. If you wish to be a perfectionist then under throw and trickle up. Can I suggest you look in SD adverts and buy the Lyman 50th Anniversary reloading manual £25 and it will tell you everything you need to know about reloading and give you all the basic reloading data for 95% of all the weapons you will ever come across.

D
 

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
fill scoops with gravity fed powder
push base of scoop into a full glass (or other suitable container) of powder
Let the powder run in by itself
use a business/credit etc card to scape the top flat

you will find with practice you can throw charges just as accurately as with a set of scales

0.2gr of powder makes cock all difference in the grand scheme of things!
 

Top