Firearms on a ferry

10willd

Well-Known Member
Going to France at the end of the month with some friends I’m taking a rifle and ammo there taking bows do I need to notify the ferry company I went last year but drove and used channel tunnel just showed fac/efp and we got waved through
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Depends on the T&Cs but certainly on Britanny Ferries you have to notify the company and the port authority, send scans of your documents in advance. They put a note on your booking and when you turn up, you're called aside by the customs guys after check in and they check the serial numbers, etc. It's painless. But turn up an extra 20 minutes early.

On the way back, they don't care.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
As PM said you need to notify the ferry company beforehand. After customs checks and the sticker on the car telling everyone that you are carrying firearms you will be parked on an area of the car deck covered by CCTV and you will be required to hand over your car keys to one of the ship's officers. Don't forget that you will need to secure the rifles in the car (security cord or locked gun case) and this will be checked on the other side by the French customs/police. It's a requirement in France to have the guns secured in the car when travelling, a gun lock will usually suffice. Also as PM says arriving back in the U.K. they generally just let you drive off with no fuss whatsoever.

Travelling by Eurotunnel is much easier but you still have to inform them on booking in at Folkestone that you are carrying firearms.
 

FlyBoy270

Well-Known Member
I remember him well - as indeed he will no doubt remember me, quoting me 'The Air Navigation Order' having done 2 hours total time against my 700hrs P1 :lol:

Wonder if the di##head is still working for Cal Mac on the Arran run, ? What a pallaver he caused.
 

Ray7756

Well-Known Member
Wonder if the di##head is still working for Cal Mac on the Arran run, ? What a pallaver he caused.

Why would you tell them stick your guns in the boot , personally i would keep the magazines and bolts in a bag with me, your cert is valid anywhere in the uk, tell them nothing
There is always a di***ead who loves to manufacture problems so it makes them feel important, they know nothing so tell them nothing
Cheers
Ray
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
Firearm on the ferry to Arran, Are you suppose advise Cal Mac? I never have.

If ever you are travelling across the Solent Wightlink expect you to hand your rifle over to Able Seaman Staines who you will not know anything about, is not an RFD and certainly may never have been vetted by plod as fit to be entrusted with a firearm. This whole exercise may also be witnessed by any of those visiting the inmates at HMP Parkhurst who might be travelling on the same ferry who might just fancy ram raiding you for your guns on the road away from the ferry terminal.
 

flying felix

Well-Known Member
By law you have to inform the ferry company in advance, at least 48 hours in most cases. The firearms are just a matter of security, but the ammo is a different matter. Through all the modes of transportation the rules that covers the Carriage of Dangerous Goods at sea are the most stringent (International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG)).

The regulations allow dispensation for a total of 1000 rounds of Small Arms Ammunition of HCC 1.4S and a UN Ser No 0012 per passenger. To qualify for this category the ammunition must be in the manufacturer’s packaging. Other ammunition, as long as it’s HCC 1.4S, can also be carried on a passenger ferry, but the dispensation does not apply and Dangerous Goods Notes must be used.

I travel by ferry about 12 times a year and use the following check list:


  1. Inform ferry company at the time of booking that you will be carrying firearms and ammunition.
  2. Ammunition and bolts locked in a safe secured to body of the car.
  3. Firearms bagged up and secured separately to the body of the car.
  4. Ammunition in manufacturers’ packaging.
  5. On arrival at ferry terminal advise check in that you are carrying “sporting goods”.

The advantage of declaring is that you are one of the first to be loaded onto the ferry and one of the first off. They will also put the car inside as opposed to being sat outside in the weather.

Hope this helps.
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
By law you have to inform the ferry company in advance, at least 48 hours in most cases. The firearms are just a matter of security, but the ammo is a different matter. Through all the modes of transportation the rules that covers the Carriage of Dangerous Goods at sea are the most stringent (International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG)).

The regulations allow dispensation for a total of 1000 rounds of Small Arms Ammunition of HCC 1.4S and a UN Ser No 0012 per passenger. To qualify for this category the ammunition must be in the manufacturer’s packaging. Other ammunition, as long as it’s HCC 1.4S, can also be carried on a passenger ferry, but the dispensation does not apply and Dangerous Goods Notes must be used.

I travel by ferry about 12 times a year and use the following check list:


  1. Inform ferry company at the time of booking that you will be carrying firearms and ammunition.
  2. Ammunition and bolts locked in a safe secured to body of the car.
  3. Firearms bagged up and secured separately to the body of the car.
  4. Ammunition in manufacturers’ packaging.
  5. On arrival at ferry terminal advise check in that you are carrying “sporting goods”.

The advantage of declaring is that you are one of the first to be loaded onto the ferry and one of the first off. They will also put the car inside as opposed to being sat outside in the weather.

Hope this helps.

Last on, last off with Wightlink, after you have retrieved your firearm from whichever unlicensed member of the crew has it in their possession. Yarmouth Primary School is almost opposite the ferry terminal, I hope that Wightlink do a CRB check on their staff.
Seely.png
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Last on, last off with Wightlink, after you have retrieved your firearm from whichever unlicensed member of the crew has it in their possession. Yarmouth Primary School is almost opposite the ferry terminal, I hope that Wightlink do a CRB check on their staff.
View attachment 99444

All Ferry Captain's are authorised to hold firearms belonging to passengers, not certain but think they may be able to delegate that duty to crew members under their charge, much like an RFD can authorise someone as a courier that person does not need to be an actual license holder.
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
All Ferry Captain's are authorised to hold firearms belonging to passengers, not certain but think they may be able to delegate that duty to crew members under their charge, much like an RFD can authorise someone as a courier that person does not need to be an actual license holder.
I can't find any such exemption in my copy of the firearms act, please point me in the right direction.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
All Ferry Captain's are authorised to hold firearms belonging to passengers, not certain but think they may be able to delegate that duty to crew members under their charge, much like an RFD can authorise someone as a courier that person does not need to be an actual license holder.

You don't actually hand over your firearms to the crew. All you hand over is the keys to the car that the firearms are secured in. The guns will of course be secured inside the car in either security cabinets or secured to the vehicle by security chains/cords to which you retain the keys. For obvious reasons any bolts (if a bolt action rifle) and any ammunition will be secured separately.
On one occasion in Portsmouth we had a slight problem with one of the U.K. customs officers who insisted that guns and ammunition had to travel in separate vehicles. I politely pointed out that this wasn't the case and asked how this is achieved when you are only travelling in one vehicle. He went away to check on that one and never returned.

I have to disagree slightly with flying felix on one small matter. When we have taken the ferry we were loaded last and off loaded last. I suppose it depends on the type of car you have as to where they decide to place you on the car deck but in any case we were separated slightly from the other cars and parked in a position that was clearly covered by the CCTV on the car deck.
 
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TH4

Well-Known Member
As PM said you need to notify the ferry company beforehand. After customs checks and the sticker on the car telling everyone that you are carrying firearms you will be parked on an area of the car deck covered by CCTV and you will be required to hand over your car keys to one of the ship's officers. Don't forget that you will need to secure the rifles in the car (security cord or locked gun case) and this will be checked on the other side by the French customs/police. It's a requirement in France to have the guns secured in the car when travelling, a gun lock will usually suffice. Also as PM says arriving back in the U.K. they generally just let you drive off with no fuss whatsoever.

Taken the ferry over several times and have never been asked for the car keys. The customs have passed the rifle to the purser and they have then handed it back to me when we arrived in France. On the way back no fuss at all serial numbers checked and left in the car. Much easier on the tunnel though.
 

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
As has already been said, you need to inform the ferry company. I drove over to the UK a couple of years ago to collect my shotgun and take it back to DK. The guy at Dover check in knew I had it in the car as his camera/computer told him I had booked it. It is worth going straight to security check before you board as you will be sent back there anyway as I was and it was a pain in the **** to find from check in. Once security have checked it you will be given a tag and your boarding card will show a code (100 in my case) They will then take the keys off you and you will have to collect them from the information desk once the ship has docked. I drove straight off in France without any checks and drove straight home to DK.
 

RTreble

Well-Known Member
Wonder if the di##head is still working for Cal Mac on the Arran run, ? What a pallaver he caused.
Its all good now. If your on as a foot passenger, just put the case into the pursers office. If your in the car, lock the doors. I always keep the bolts, bullets & license on myself and sit outside the office door.
 
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