First real track

NigelM

Well-Known Member
The mutt is now just over 2. HWV so still behaves like a pup but I have been religious about taking him out stalking with me for over a year now, no matter how painful it was, and he is calming down, walking to heal, just about, and will sit and wait very reliably if I park him up. I put him on everything I shoot, but most of the time they lie dead in the field or in plain enough view and it's not really a challenge.

Went out this morning. Put him in his harness before we left the car as usual and he behaved as well as normal. About an hour and a half in I sat him up about 5 yards before the corner of a long hedge and field margin and snuck up to the corner, just in case. Sure enough there were Roe in the field about 70 yards away. Picked out the Doe, nice broad side heart shot, kicked her back legs in the air, and legged in through the hedge - right into 2 acres of standing maize cover crop.

Went back to the dog who was still parked up, but somewhat excited, clipped on the tracking lead and took him to the point of shot. Lots of claret on the ground which he stuck his nose into and then for the first time, behaving like a scent hound rather than his usual air scenting mode, stuck his nose on the floor, picked up the blood trail and dragged me through the hedge. When we got through I had no idea which direction to go in but he was pulling like a train and charged right into the middle of the maize dragging me along behind him, where after 30 yards he bumped right into the dead Doe.

There was a good fresh blood trail, so it's not time to declare him as tracker of the year, but I was impressed.

He is turning out to be a true dual purpose dog. He is now after 2 seasons a great pointer on the grouse moor and on the partridge and pheasant on the little walked up shoot we have at home.

Chuffed to bits!
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Thank you norm. The dog has added a whole new dimension to the sport. Great company and a useful tool. I did wonder about the "useful tool" bit when he was younger, but he's just starting to come good I hope.
 

foxinmad

Well-Known Member
Congratulations on the recovery of the Doe, It's great when it eventually clicks inside there head and your hard work and patience pays off :thumb: I'm still waiting yet ha-ha.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Thank you guys.

Had the great pleasure of going out with SikaMalc last week on a couple of stalks and watching his 9 year old BMH work. Gave me a lot of pointers as to what I should be expecting of the dog and what "good" looks like. A couple more years hard work and hopefully we will get there.

In the meantime, it's great fun learning a new game with my little friend.
 

jackfish

Well-Known Member
Great stuff, I do enjoy reading these updates on how other stalkers are getting on with their dogs :thumb:
I love taking my HWV out with me, he is a pleasure to be with and as you say it's just a case of sticking with it. My lad has already surprised me with a good track at just under 1 years old. He can be as stubborn as a mule when we ain't out shooting but as soon as the rifle goes over the shoulder he knows what we're up to! Fantastic intelligent breed, so much so that I am thinking of a second one.

ATB

B
 

seibassman7

Well-Known Member
excellent job. well done to you for you hard work and patience and to you4 legged friend for the track. great to read about it. regards sbm.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys.

Out again last Friday. 2 good stalks. the walking to heel was better, he was more aware of what the game was following last weeks result. As soon as we clocked the deer he went down to the lying position and just watched me as I got myself into position and took the shots.

After both he didn't move a muscle, just waited for me to come over and put the tracking lead on, then again it was off like a train to where he clocked the Doe go down.

Unfortunately, perhaps, both were out in the open, so no tracking required, but he has taken to going in all guns blazing, grabbing them by the throat and ragging them. Very aggressive.

Can't quite make my mind up if this is good or bad. On both occasions deer were very dead, so the thought is that he should not be as aggressive as we might end up with meat damage, but I am quick to praise him and then make him sit up while I gralloch.

However, I don't think I should discourage the behaviour as if the deer was winged and needed stopping I don't want him thinking it's a bad thing to bring it down and stop it.

But then we are only talking about Roe Does at the moment. If it was a Buck or worse a Sika Stag do I really want to risk the dog by encouraging him to go at it all guns blazing and bring it down by the throat.

So many questions and I don't really know the answers...........what do you think?
 

Uncle Norm

Well-Known Member
I have seen some serious injuries inflicted by Muntjac. Dog walkers allow the dogs to chase the deer and if a buck is cornered it will turn and fight. So potential injury to your dog is indeed an issue.

I think I will leave it to others to advise further on this though. I would not knowingly risk my dog on a lively male deer.

As an aside, I always give Ruby my Labrador bitch some sliced up heart from the gralloch. She sits and waits for it and even starts salivating as I get to the point where I give her the reward.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Bear is not a great heart lover, but give him a bit of tripe and its woofed down.

Not sure what to do about the aggressive bit. He's on a tracking lead so under control and if it is a Buck or Stag I can easily stop him, it's just the thought of a runner and what I would do if I had one.

Not happened yet but I'm sure it will one day. Would just like to have the answer to the question worked out before it happens rather than make the decision on the spot.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
Bear is not a great heart lover, but give him a bit of tripe and its woofed down.

Not sure what to do about the aggressive bit. He's on a tracking lead so under control and if it is a Buck or Stag I can easily stop him, it's just the thought of a runner and what I would do if I had one.

Not happened yet but I'm sure it will one day. Would just like to have the answer to the question worked out before it happens rather than make the decision on the spot.
Perhaps a vest like i use on my dog when boar hunting is the way to go. It would protect the dog from Munti attack and should save the dog from the worst if he mixes it with a Sika. You need a bold dog but i think he will get bolder the older he gets.
 

wag

Well-Known Member
When I trained mine I use to go back the next day and do the same track cold. Reward with a Leg and heart.
 

venery

Active Member
I recognise the description of the HWV behaviour as my HWV is 20 mths and is only now just coming around to thinking that coming to heel is not optional and open to interpretation. He knows exactly what heeling is and the command that goes with it but considers it only has a 10 second time limit before all bets are off particularly after he has shaken his head and cleared it of any instructions.
I started mine on deer only for first 12 mths stalking and blood trailing and he now follows a 400m scent shoe trail and 100ml blood without a problem even following a roe trail across fresh red slots and **** without deviation. I then took him with me dogging in and then beating on a pheasant shoot and he has taken to it like the proverbial duck to water. Points pheasants, partridge, woodcock and rabbits and has retrieved all of them plus pigeons. He also sits quietly on a peg with all guns blazing until i accidentally shoot one and then watching it fall he can't wait to retrieve it.
Because he ranges a bit wider than spaniels i have to get the lead out near the flushing point as i would not like to bet on the whistle versus a shed load of pheasants milling around just asking to be caught! Becoming a good all round gun dog and would not leave him home now in any scenario. Tried it once to sit in high seat and wife said he howled the house down after i left, she was not best pleased.
 

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