Fish dying

kes

Well-Known Member
Salmon and trout, even coarse fish (Barbel etc) are dying in the Wye and the Usk around here - anyone else suffering low flows/low oxygen and dangerously high water temps?
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
I had the pleasure of casting a fly on the Stour near Canterbury yesterday and was pleasantly surprised by both water level and current. Not ideal but had convinced myself it would be a lot worse.

K
 

User00025

Well-Known Member
I have two rivers on the Estate, one dries up every summer just leaving pools. I am told there are sinkholes in it's bed further up, but have the feeling it's over abstraction upstream. The other varies very little in flow unless it's torrential and prolonged rainfall and has a few Grayling in it. The dried up one is far more picturesque and would be a dream to fish but sadly not on. No sign of any fish dying yet, other than by Otters.
 

Scuttlebuttin

Well-Known Member
The Tyne, being the premier fishing river in England for salmon, has been getting "compensation water" from Kielder, it's cold and is supposed to freshen up the river water and add oxygen, the river Wear and Tees are supposed to get some, but none of the angling clubs on the river have reported any changes. Are we being spun a line? (pardon the pun).
 

devon deer stalker

Well-Known Member
I haven't seen any evidence of fish dying on my local river Teign, but I have also never seen it so low, a lot of Sea Trout and Salmon are apparently still waiting to run the river.
Cheers
Richard
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
Being near the coast, my waters seem to benefit from the sea breeze as far as oxygen is concerned, but someone said they caught a 'lethargic' carp yesterday.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I've never been a fan of catch and release for game fish. The thing isn't a toy. Catch it, kill it, eat it. Elsewise leave the thing alone in the water and leave your rod at home. Too many people catch and release game fish that whilst they may swim away immediately when let go...obviously it's an esacpe reflex like badly shot animal...but are too often found floating belly side up and dead soon after.
 

Scuttlebuttin

Well-Known Member
Catch it, kill it, eat it.

It's a great deal different now, salmon and sea trout are so low in numbers on some rivers, that catch and release is mandatory, if the problem carries on, fishing will be stopped until numbers increase. The biggest problem is the EA, who are doing nothing to improve anything from water quality to the spawning areas in the upper reaches of the rivers and streams.
 

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
I've never been a fan of catch and release for game fish. The thing isn't a toy. Catch it, kill it, eat it. Elsewise leave the thing alone in the water and leave your rod at home. Too many people catch and release game fish that whilst they may swim away immediately when let go...obviously it's an esacpe reflex like badly shot animal...but are too often found floating belly side up and dead soon after.

It's known to be unusual for properly handled game fish to be harmed by catch and release. It can be a problem for some sea fish.
Staying at home would be better for the fish. We could also vastly improve the environment by having nobody go into or through the countryside, except where strictly necessary.
The fish isn't a toy, but fishing is a perfectly valid sport. The objection doesn't lend itself to comparisons with other field sports.
 

hogey

Well-Known Member
The Tyne, being the premier fishing river in England for salmon, has been getting "compensation water" from Kielder, it's cold and is supposed to freshen up the river water and add oxygen, the river Wear and Tees are supposed to get some, but none of the angling clubs on the river have reported any changes. Are we being spun a line? (pardon the pun).

As far as I am aware the Wear and Tees do not get any water from Kielder . The release is directly into the North Tyne which then runs into the Main Tyne .
 

Rasputin

Well-Known Member
I've never been a fan of catch and release for game fish. The thing isn't a toy. Catch it, kill it, eat it. Elsewise leave the thing alone in the water and leave your rod at home. Too many people catch and release game fish that whilst they may swim away immediately when let go...obviously it's an esacpe reflex like badly shot animal...but are too often found floating belly side up and dead soon after.

What a load of twaddle only time I have ever seen that happen is if someone has deeply and I mean very deeply hooked a fish. Fish are amazing hardy you only need to look at how rough they get when cormorants or other predators get hold of them and they recover. A well hooked and properly cared for game fish will be absolutely fine. However dont get me started on the morons who let them flop about on rocks and gravel whilst they take a selfie thats another thing entirely.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
I've never been a fan of catch and release for game fish. The thing isn't a toy. Catch it, kill it, eat it. Elsewise leave the thing alone in the water and leave your rod at home. Too many people catch and release game fish that whilst they may swim away immediately when let go...obviously it's an esacpe reflex like badly shot animal...but are too often found floating belly side up and dead soon after.

A chap who I bought a salmon fly rod off some years ago, told me exactly the same thing. He reckoned catch and release of game fish was a stupid idea because the fish was so stressed by the fight that it soon died anyway. He had seen it happen on the Frome.
 

Essexsussex

Well-Known Member
A chap who I bought a salmon fly rod off some years ago, told me exactly the same thing. He reckoned catch and release of game fish was a stupid idea because the fish was so stressed by the fight that it soon died anyway. He had seen it happen on the Frome.

i can see both sides of the argument but we know that the fish don’t die when released on at least most occasions. I have caught tagged salmon on several occasions on rivers where there is a programme. If released properly, without removing from the water and by holding into the current until fit they will be fine on most occasions. There are circumstances where you can see the colour drain from them and you know they won’t be right, but this has probably only happens to me twice.

Doesn’t mean that the ethics are right but as I say I can see both sides of the argument - and I do believe in and fish catch and release because in my opinion the income supports the habitat of the fish in circumstances where the population can not sustain every fish being knocked.

I do think that though that the popularity of catch and release has encouraged fishing for salmon that are more stale than you would bother fishing for in a culture of catch and kill, but then we are a small island with not enough fish for everyone who wants to catch them so rivers are fished longer seasons.
 

williamwansbeck

Well-Known Member
Re the Wear and Tees there is a large bore pipe line from Kielder to the head waters of them both but Northumbria water does not like to let flow away.a few years ago water was let into the Tees then through a water filter plant and trucked down into Yorkshire which was having supply problems,but of course money was changing hands and the water companies did not mind letting the flow run,
 

hogey

Well-Known Member
Re the Wear and Tees there is a large bore pipe line from Kielder to the head waters of them both but Northumbria water does not like to let flow away.a few years ago water was let into the Tees then through a water filter plant and trucked down into Yorkshire which was having supply problems,but of course money was changing hands and the water companies did not mind letting the flow run,

I stand corrected then,we learn something everyday

Northumberland's Kielder Water in 35 facts - 35 years after it was officially opened - Chronicle Live

A link for anyone interested
 
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Cyres

Well-Known Member
Re catch and release many years ago whilst fishing a small brook I caught a brown trout twice and released it. 3rd time it went into a keep net to keep it out of harm. it was quite a big wild brownie.

Another day a friend and I had a brilliant day on the Avon/somerset canal at Reading we caught a shed load of good pike on lures. When we looked at the pictures it appeared we caught one big double twice. Several hundred yards from its original capture.

Biggest treat to salmon/seatrout will be otters.

D
 

mack8317

Well-Known Member
What a load of twaddle only time I have ever seen that happen is if someone has deeply and I mean very deeply hooked a fish. Fish are amazing hardy you only need to look at how rough they get when cormorants or other predators get hold of them and they recover. A well hooked and properly cared for game fish will be absolutely fine. However dont get me started on the morons who let them flop about on rocks and gravel whilst they take a selfie thats another thing entirely.

There actually quite delicate when you handle or net a salmon when water temperature's are high with low oxygen levels you have a stressed fish any damage to the skin mucus membrane tends to lead to a bacterial infection and the fish you thought you released to spawn dies about a week later Salmon farmers used to use antibiotics prophylactically to reduce there mortality rates when handling fish in the summer
 
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