Food hygiene

sauer

Well-Known Member
Ok
Been few comments lately on food hygiene and how folk are assuming it's doubtful it's a problem realistically

My wife used to work in public health laboratory labs testing for various stuff after people complained about a restaurant etc

Campylobacter .....how many of you have never heard of it ?
Over 200,000 fol hospitalised every year and over 300 people die from it ....where Is it ?

It's in over 70% of the chicken sitting on supermarket shelves

This one alone beats salmonella in the figures stakes.

Now one pertinent to us .....Ecoli .........where is it ?
In the stomach & gut contents of the deer we shoot

I don't have the figures but there have been outbreaks with it recently ....traced back to Highland game meatballs ....a minced product not cooked properly .

One thing tho after speaking to folks who have had any of these conditions ...... it's not funny
It's not just a dodgy belly
It's not the sh11te yourself thin diet

Most folks thought they were going to die ....some say never felt anything like it and wouldn't wish it on their worst enemy


So yes it may just be a bit of green but there is a whole point to meat hygiene

No you don't need a bit of paper or DSC to say ok now I'm fit to do this

But education is key
Standards are there for a reason

Your actions are there to prevent or at very least minimise the chance of the poor bar steward who can't cook possibly killing himself

And if your the one in the kitchen or on th BBQ this year ...buy a meat thermometer , this fad for medium rare beef burgers ?
Idiots!



Please .....don't ever give it , the
" what harm can it do crap "

That's unacceptable ....and I hope you don't have to go thru same to get the point

Paul
 

Moray Outfitting

Well-Known Member
:tiphat: - thats a whole box of jaffa for you at the DSF :D

Aimed at no one and no post - so please dont try to read it as such. But what someone personally chooses to do or specifically not do regards rules/regulations/ statute is, I suggest, a poor choice of subject for a public forum - in any domain of endeavour. As it is this sport of ours is under constant scrutiny and some assertions that get made are pure manna from heaven for those that would happily see us legislated into history.

I realise that what flags up is a vociferous very minor minority and within that sector there's a lot of shall we say 'imagination' at work as opposed to real things outside. Here I refer to Father Ted's diagram of two circles ' dream' and 'Reality' that he utilised with Dougal. But those outside looking in - particularly with their own possibly anti agenda wont pause to see it that way.

There is so much incredibly good and positive about what we do - directly and indirectly. How about we all have a go at focussing for our next ten posts each on those aspects rather than trawl back through what are essentially ego massage exercises beit it hygiene, ballistics, blasers, gralloch, case cleaning, long range - you name it, we seem able to fight over it. :tiphat:
 

Glyn 1

Well-Known Member
Good post Paul. The other thing that people often forget is that you and your family may have cast iron stomachs and always cook your food properly but once you sell or give away a carcass you no longer have any control over where it goes or what products it is made into.
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
Campylobacter .....how many of you have never heard of it ?
I've heard of it and had it ... and I almost certainly got it from a deer. Couple years ago I screwed up a shot on a roe buck which ended up running off towards some woodland with one leg wobbling all over the place. It was running directly away from me and at about 150m + the follow up shot was only going in one place. It was a very warm summer morning and opening up the carcass soon had flies all over the place, including my sweaty face. Whether it was the flies or if I inadvertently wiped across my mouth during the process I'll never know. Less than 4 hours later I was on the bog with a massive dose of Bambi's Revenge. Subsequent visit to GP and relevant sampling confirmed campylobacter. Not an experience I'd want to repeat although I did loose a stone in weight.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Cheers guys

You are both right ... & im probably wasting my time ...
But
When people make light of something which can essentially kill someone & as stalkers we could possibly reduce / minimize that chance then it angers me for someone to say what's the chance ? It will be fine.
I'm sure there are folk On here who will have had food poisoning ... not just a dodgy belly but full on food poisoning .... ask them how bad it feels ....
If it can be minimized?
Then let's do that

Paul
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
I've heard of it and had it ... and I almost certainly got it from a deer. Couple years ago I screwed up a shot on a roe buck which ended up running off towards some woodland with one leg wobbling all over the place. It was running directly away from me and at about 150m + the follow up shot was only going in one place. It was a very warm summer morning and opening up the carcass soon had flies all over the place, including my sweaty face. Whether it was the flies or if I inadvertently wiped across my mouth during the process I'll never know. Less than 4 hours later I was on the bog with a massive dose of Bambi's Revenge. Subsequent visit to GP and relevant sampling confirmed campylobacter. Not an experience I'd want to repeat although I did loose a stone in weight.
You know how it feels then

It's killed many , hospitalized thousands & left folk never quite same again ....
Knew it was prevelant in fowl but unknowledgeable of it in deer.

Hope you have no long lasting effects

Here's a man with first hand experience

Paul
 

Ray7756

Well-Known Member
Straightforward no nonsence advice, follow the hygiene rules, if its for your own consumption , follow the rules unless you want end up very sick or worse
Simples
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Good post Paul. The other thing that people often forget is that you and your family may have cast iron stomachs and always cook your food properly but once you sell or give away a carcass you no longer have any control over where it goes or what products it is made into.
Sadly, this is exactly the problem! There does seem to be a minority of folk that think it is fine to put unfit carcasses into the food chain with the attitude that, "a little bit of green never hurt anyone"! Ultimately though, it's not them that gets poorly.
Most of us work very hard to produce the best carcasses we can, and the venison trade is flourishing. Unfortunately, it only takes one case of food poisoning traced back to deer to bring it all crashing back down, including the price we get paid. It is everyone's responsibility to ensure that this doesn't happen.
MS
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
Yes, I have had Campylobacter too. It was before I started stalking though so could have been from anywhere? It's real eye of a needle stuff and gives you stomach cramps like you wouldn't believe! It certainly makes you focus on your hygiene after a dose of that!
My son also had it as a baby and was hospitalised for 3 days!
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
Knew it was prevelant in fowl but unknowledgeable of it in deer.

Hope you have no long lasting effects
TBH the published literature seems to indicate that deer aren't a major source of infection. Having a personal interest, I looked at various studies from around the world.The headline Google results all turned up reports that showed very few deer had the bacteria present. Those that did showed no obvious sign of it other than occasional diarrhea. Fact is, some deer do have it.

AFAIK there are no long lasting effects thanks, other than loosing about a week of my life... A serious course of Clarithromycin did the trick.
 

NoIDeer

Well-Known Member
There's a Scottish study that reckons the biggest problem with venison is fecal contamination and ecoli 0157.
 

berg

Well-Known Member
I believe that there are also deferent strains of ecoli .also a big point that has been missed is that if you are not a registered food business and don't have the correct food liability insurance to cover such things you are liable in a court of law if you give someone food poisoning.a rather seriously matter could arise from giving or selling someone some venison who then fed his family and they got ecoli poisoning and could prove it came form you ,your in big big trouble and could face huge fines .just a word of warning ⚠ to the ones with the I've been doing it for year and no ones been ill yet attitude.once its left your hands you have no control what happens to it that is why we have to tell people there's only 3days life on fresh meat products unless you can provide proof to say otherwise.so if you do give meat away or sell it put a use buy date on it a some recommendations on a sicker on the bag it could save you bacon one day.
 

The fourth Horseman

Well-Known Member
I had it 30 years ago, got it from goat's milk. My friends you do not want it, luckily my Doctor was also a pathologist and after the first cramps and decorating the house from both ends, the result was hospitalisation within two hours. I was in for three weeks,touch and go,and I was superfit then. The pains were that bad I had intravenal cortizone every day. My Mrs was already on the way to making the "necessary arrangements" at the time. I now dare not eat food that is too spicy and any goat product would put me on the road to dusty death. Be very careful!!!!
 

Legolas

Well-Known Member
I've also had it, not deer related but picked up from getting an unexpected farm yard related face pack. As the other lads said, the stomach cramps are unbelievable and a week squitting through the eye of a needle will leave you a good stone lighter and with an arse that resembles a blood orange. Not something I would wish to go through again. Having a disabled wife and two young kids, it did give me a bit of a reality jolt that I can't afford to be ill, so even though the illness was accidental, it did cause me to change a few lifestyle habits, so every cloud and all that.
 

andyf

Well-Known Member
I've heard of it and had it ... and I almost certainly got it from a deer..... Less than 4 hours later I was on the bog with a massive dose of Bambi's Revenge. Subsequent visit to GP and relevant sampling confirmed campylobacter. Not an experience I'd want to repeat although I did loose a stone in weight.
It won't have been from the deer. Incubation for Campylobacter (and most other food poisoning) is somewhere around 2-3 days. Most folk make the assumption it was the last thing they ate but if it's pukka food poisoning (Campylobacter, Salmonella etc.) it's going to have come from something they ate a couple of days previous.
 

opticron1

Well-Known Member
Was actually going to make the same comment andyf. Having had campylobacter and looked after people with the same, I agree that the first symptoms of food poisoning come on within 4-6 hours, but it usually takes between 2-11 days to get the fully incubated instant weight loss programme associated with Campylobacter. Kidney damage can occur easily and rehydration is the name of the game. Ribena was the only thing I could face for a week - despite the fact that it was coming out the same colour at the other end! Haven't been able to face it ever again! The cause of all this fun - poorly prepared and cooked chicken. My better half had same bug, but from contaminated salad due to poor hygiene/mixing preparation tools....... Me paranoid now.... you bet!
 

tikka_madras

Well-Known Member
I had confirmed campylobacter poisoning a couple of years ago, probably from handling dead pheasants on our local shoot before a sandwich lunch in the field (nowhere to wash hands...)

It is absolutely horrific. About five days of complete devastation then another week of feeling ill. Really not worth the risk.
 

Top