Fox Snare

#1
A friend of mine has a fox that is regularly taking the occasional chicken and duck but last week it took one of his breeding geese. I've shot a few foxes for him, general calling, waiting out and stalking but this one seems to be very elusive and doesn't stick to a particular routine.

With th a young family and full time job I can't dedicate enough hours a week to waiting out for it at the moment and what with him running a campsite on his farm I'm also limited to only the .22lr for noise reasons.

with this in mind I'd like to set a snare or two in some places I know it frequents as I can spare 15 mins twice a day to check them but just not the time to wait out until I get it. I've seen some online and they're about £20 for 10 so not too expensive. Really I'd only want a couple and if it works out then I'll look to get more for other places that are tricky to shoot.

So so down to the brass tacks so to speak, is there anyone on here who would sell me just a couple from their existing stock to get me started and maybe spare 10 minutes for a phone call to let me know any tips and secrets (I've read as much as I can but nothing like some real experience) or even better someone in Sussex who I could pop over and see, buy a couple and have a chat about techniques?

Thanks in advance
 

Tis1979

Well-Known Member
#2
Hi if i were you i would buy the 10 because if your checking 2 then its not much more time to check 10 if you put them in runs/likely spots in a loop from your motor round to back to your motor, and you've increased your chances of getting it somewhat.
Hopefully someone local to you will offer to come and show you the ropes i would if i was closer, just be sure to read up on the legalities of snareing.

Good luck with it
 
#3
Thanks for the reply. You do make a good point and I think I will eventually get more if I manage to get the hang of them and they work well. I was hoping more to meet or chat with someone more experienced,start with a couple and go from there.
 

Tis1979

Well-Known Member
#4
Thanks for the reply. You do make a good point and I think I will eventually get more if I manage to get the hang of them and they work well. I was hoping more to meet or chat with someone more experienced,start with a couple and go from there.
No worries & totally agree, hopefully theres someone on here that can help you out.

Atb
 
#7
Get a cage trap and place it inside the hen house pop hole.
The fox has taken most the birds during daylight hours, the recent goose was around lunchtime and was free range (well in the garden on the lawn).

Unfortunately I've never been a shotgun shooter so don't have any contacts with local shoots but I will ask about via a few friends and see if they will be able to pass on my details and get some advice that way.
 

Norfolk Horn

Well-Known Member
#11
I had a very similar problem at home with a vixen taking hens and guinea fowl at all times of the day from my paddocks. I decided to try and snare the offenders and after reading up managed to catch the vixen and six large cubs all in one small area of a few square yards over a couple of weeks.
I managed to direct them into the snare lines by using briers etc to guide them. So far so good.

Now a word of warning.
I moved the snares to a different location just fifty yards further along my property and then caught two of my guinea fowl one dead and one I managed to saved. So please be careful you don't take more birds than the fox
 

ileso

Well-Known Member
#13
sure a fox will take a fully fledged goose?
could be a dog... though i did have a cat take out a fully grown muscovy a few weeks ago...hot lead for desert...

anyway, is it not possible to bait the fox somehow and shoot it? half a chicken carcass or gutted rabbit... works on cats
 
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#14
Ten goose that was taken was the aggressive one that always ran up to people hissing. I think the fox came in too near the nest and this goose went to see him off and the fox was brave enough to take it on. I have shot a few foxes on this farm and elsewhere and now the grass is 18" high it's proving more elusive. I've had a look here | Fox Snaring UK and seems like a good place to get the basics and prices are ok (although £8.50 p+p seems a bit steep) so I think I'll wait to payday and get started.
 

A Guy Out West

Well-Known Member
#16
That's a good video. Dye the snares black with logwood bark or what ever you have over there. Boil the hardware before setting and wear gloves when making sets.
 
#17
Why do not use a body grip trap or it's illegal here? Because the fox die immediately and it is not necessary to think how to take of from the snare.
Those types of traps are illegal here due to the fact that other non target species may be killed ie badgers and cats.
The idea of the snares is that if a badger were caught it could be released relatively unharmed.
 

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