Foxing Help

joed

Well-Known Member
I am starting to gear up to start foxing on my local farm permission. I haven't been out lamping foxes before and whilst I have done it solo for rabbits, I haven't yet had the right tool for the job for foxes.

What I would like to do is get out with an experienced fox shooter, to get hints and tips, from squeaking them in, to the best way to lamp them. I want to do the job properly. I do have permission and so could do it at mine (subject to clearing it with landowner) but am more than happy to go to someone else's and help out whilst they get on with the job, I can be the lap man or the fetcher, or the tea boy!!! I have an open certificate, not a complete weirdo, my own insurance, my own flask, my own rifle, my own ammo and I make blooming good pies if it helps at all! :)

Can anyone help (obviously localish to me!!)

Cheers
Joe
 

RED-DOT

Account Suspended
You sound like my kind of gate bitch but as to the pies you will need to bring false teeth to allow mastication of same?
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
I love getting out and opening gates...oh yeah, just make sure you stop in a puddle
ha ha like the humour, see if you can get a copy of Foxing with Lamp and Rifle by Robert Bucknell the fox shooters bible almost everything you need to know to get started.

regards WB
 

Jim xyz

Well-Known Member
Hi Joe,

I put a similar thread up a couple of years ago and since then I've had loads of help and guidance from people on here. It's a shame you're not closer or you'd be welcome to join me one night.

I do all my foxing solo on foot because that works best on the land I shoot over. I use a 22.250 with a lamp on the sight and carry another torch in my pocket for lamping/scanning. I've bought quite a few cheap Cree LED's off ebay and they are great but If you're starting out I'd get a couple of T38's from Marky 610 on the NV forum. I know everyone has there own ideas but personally I stick with white light so I can see exactly what it is before I pull the trigger.

I tend to walk the fields scanning every so often for eye shine and then either try and call it in closer or move to a position where I can get a safe shot. Call wise I bought a wam caller which I use with mixed results, anything from having a fox appear at my feet running full pelt, to them turning on their heals and disappearing as soon as I start to squeak with it. Most of my shots are at around the 100 meter mark, I'm 100% confident I'm going to drop Charlie at that range and it means I can be absolutely certain that it is a fox before I pull the trigger.

I did find that some where lamp shy so I was struggling to get in to a position to take a safe shot as they'd get spooked by me putting the lamp on them too often so I bought a cheap Gen 1 NV spotter second hand and mounted an IR T38 on it which means that I can now spot them (eye shine out to at least 300 Meters) and get into a good position before I put the lamp on just to make 100% sure before I pull the trigger.

Like everything in life I'm sure there are at least 1001 different ways of going about it and 1000 of those are probably better than mine but I find it works for me.

Jim
 

SimpleSimon

Well-Known Member
I am starting to gear up to start foxing on my local farm permission. I haven't been out lamping foxes before and whilst I have done it solo for rabbits, I haven't yet had the right tool for the job for foxes.

What I would like to do is get out with an experienced fox shooter, to get hints and tips, from squeaking them in, to the best way to lamp them. I want to do the job properly. I do have permission and so could do it at mine (subject to clearing it with landowner) but am more than happy to go to someone else's and help out whilst they get on with the job, I can be the lap man or the fetcher, or the tea boy!!! I have an open certificate, not a complete weirdo, my own insurance, my own flask, my own rifle, my own ammo and I make blooming good pies if it helps at all! :)

Can anyone help (obviously localish to me!!)

Cheers
Joe
I've got a book about foxing and a youthful enthusiasm, I'm more than willing to come down and help you with your pie control ;)
 

paul dillon

Well-Known Member
Hi joed,

I use a 170 lamp on a lanyard around my neck for main scan an old falconry vest for the battery and a Nightmaster 800 fitted to my scope bit awkward at first but soon get used to it in practice I would gladly take you out with me but it will have to be in a few weeks time as have a broken ankle at the moment.
pm me if you like and we can have a chat

ATB
Paul D
 

ELMER FUDD

Well-Known Member
Didn't know you were into fox's Joe. When you are down next we can do a bit of foxing later if you like. If I bring my rf we can have a bash at some rabbits too

Just bring some warm clothing and a full flask
 

jimmy milnes

Well-Known Member
Didn't know you were into fox's Joe. When you are down next we can do a bit of foxing later if you like. If I bring my rf we can have a bash at some rabbits too

Just bring some warm clothing and a full flask
well Barry I can vouch for ya mouse squeak impression pal it certainly works
regards
Jimmy
 

ELMER FUDD

Well-Known Member
Hi Jimmy, Yeah that fox was a long way off when he heard me squeak and ended up right below us looking up, one lucky fox who was in very good condition.
 

sir-lamp-alot

Well-Known Member
save your pies and get out there and give it a go shot a couple and get a couple wrong, learn from what you did wrong and keep going at it yes some people can give you hints and tips and these can be great but learning your ground and the foxes on it is what you really need there is no magic secret of foxing only a under standing of what works and what doesnt and i truly belive a lot of this has to be learnt for yourself
 

Top