Frightening Roe away

simonl

Well-Known Member
I've started to get some roe appearing at home. With some corn cut I'm now lamping foxes regularly & disturbing the roe most nights for maybe an hour. They vanish into the woods. I've noticed the numbers dwindle over the last few weeks.

Am I frightening them away?
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
You're sure disturbing them with the light and movement/scent, but they'll also be getting educated to the sound of your vehicle and activity/regular routine; guessing too that you enter and exit the fields from the same points? Maybe also a general 'order of service' that even the fox might pick up on?

One area I stalk is frequented by a farmer who does his rounds on a quad bike, best time to see activity there is 10-20 mins after he leaves ime, had both fox and deer energe once the disturbance dies down.

Lamping foxes or night time activity is not appreciated by roosting gamebirds, especially partridges, which detest night time disturbance, but most of the folk dong the lamping do not sufficiently appreciate this aspect, imv. When asked to consider what impact they are having, they are quick to offer "Reduction in predation", but often do not consider the impact on wildlife they themselves are having. There are far more effective/efficient and less disturbing/damaging ways to deal with foxes, but if you do feel that you simply must get out among them at night, then think about investing in thermal kit, which is passive; this still won't mitigate the negative impact of your scent and noise, though.
 

FISH BOY

Well-Known Member
You're sure disturbing them with the light and movement/scent, but they'll also be getting educated to the sound of your vehicle and activity/regular routine; guessing too that you enter and exit the fields from the same points? Maybe also a general 'order of service' that even the fox might pick up on?

One area I stalk is frequented by a farmer who does his rounds on a quad bike, best time to see activity there is 10-20 mins after he leaves ime, had both fox and deer energe once the disturbance dies down.

Lamping foxes or night time activity is not appreciated by roosting gamebirds, especially partridges, which detest night time disturbance, but most of the folk dong the lamping do not sufficiently appreciate this aspect, imv. When asked to consider what impact they are having, they are quick to offer "Reduction in predation", but often do not consider the impact on wildlife they themselves are having. There are far more effective/efficient and less disturbing/damaging ways to deal with foxes, but if you do feel that you simply must get out among them at night, then think about investing in thermal kit, which is passive; this still won't mitigate the negative impact of your scent and noise, though.

Wise words. I know a keeper that feeds with a spreader on the back of a quad, gets to the end of the ride, turns around and there are 10 munties having a feed.

I believe animals love a routine as much as we do...
 

shakey jake

Well-Known Member
I knowa keeper feedsthe same, he turns it round and shoots the munties, i would think once the land settles down after harvest\drilling the roe will settle down if you have enough foragefor them, plenty of the farms i lamp have roe and they seem to take very little intrest in the lamp, but i dont hold it on them long
 

simonl

Well-Known Member
Lamping foxes or night time activity is not appreciated by roosting gamebirds, especially partridges, which detest night time disturbance, but most of the folk dong the lamping do not sufficiently appreciate this aspect, imv. When asked to consider what impact they are having, they are quick to offer "Reduction in predation", but often do not consider the impact on wildlife they themselves are having. There are far more effective/efficient and less disturbing/damaging ways to deal with foxes, but if you do feel that you simply must get out among them at night, then think about investing in thermal kit, which is passive; this still won't mitigate the negative impact of your scent and noise, though.

A couple of questions:
1. What do you mean by birds being disturbed? If they're not flushing with the lamp, do you feel that roosting pheasants will move away for subsequent roosts? Or what's the impact & when?
2. Keen to learn what you consider more effective/efficient than lamping?
 

teyhan1

Well-Known Member
A couple of questions:
1. What do you mean by birds being disturbed? If they're not flushing with the lamp, do you feel that roosting pheasants will move away for subsequent roosts? Or what's the impact & when?
2. Keen to learn what you consider more effective/efficient than lamping?

i thought lamping foxes was efficient. Then I bought a thermal and realised I was only shooting the stupid ones.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
A couple of questions:
1. What do you mean by birds being disturbed? If they're not flushing with the lamp, do you feel that roosting pheasants will move away for subsequent roosts? Or what's the impact & when?
2. Keen to learn what you consider more effective/efficient than lamping?

1) Observe the impact of "son et lumiere" on your subsequent bird sightings and indeed eventual returns; don't imagine that they are willing to adapt to your ways, you'll find they'll be voting with their feet soon enough;

2) if you think lamping is either effective and/or efficent, then (respectfully) you're not thinking hard enough! There is already a trade-off in terms of effort and disturbance made against return/s (do you kill a fox or indeed "the" "damaging" fox on each of your rounds, as you certainly impact on the peace that gamebirds crave throughout the hours of darkness on each round that you do.

Are your pheasants all jugging on the ground, or roosting in trees?
 
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