Geco Softpoint ammo 243

PSE Composites Limited

KB1

Well-Known Member
Was thinking of getting a few rounds of these (using for fox, up to fallow).
What are the main differences re trajectory, accuracy and impact between a soft point round like these and an equivalent polymer tipped version?
 

murrayb

Well-Known Member
These are cheap and cheerful and I have taken two fallow with 'em and a fox last season. But the ones I had were 105 grains and I wasn't happy with it on the fox. My 223 knocks 'em down on the spot. With the 243 and the 105 grain SP the bugger ran 50 yards before realising it was dead.

But they are good enough - group "ok" and do the job. I prefer my home loads though.....
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
What are the main differences re trajectory, accuracy and impact between a soft point round like these and an equivalent polymer tipped version?

The only way you'll find out is by shooting some through your rifle. I've tried them on the range although not yet on live quarry. For what it's worth, through my CZ 550 they shoot to the same POA as Norma 100gn SP and produce a 1 inch group at 100 metres. The only ballistic tip comparison I can give you is with Remington 95gn Accutips which produce a 3.5 inch group 2.5 inches above the POA through the same rifle.
 

scotch_egg

Well-Known Member
What price are these Geco's?

Some times reloading is such a chore. A box in the safe may be the difference between getting out shooting or an evening at the reloading bench yawn!
 

KB1

Well-Known Member
The only way you'll find out is by shooting some through your rifle. I've tried them on the range although not yet on live quarry. For what it's worth, through my CZ 550 they shoot to the same POA as Norma 100gn SP and produce a 1 inch group at 100 metres. The only ballistic tip comparison I can give you is with Remington 95gn Accutips which produce a 3.5 inch group 2.5 inches above the POA through the same rifle.
So you found the accustoms less accurate? I would have thought the ballistic tips would be more accurate than a soft point.
 

al4x1

Well-Known Member
just a thought on these but why do Gecco seem to make their rounds heavy for caliber, the .243 are 105 grains and the .223 I think are 58 seems very odd to stray from the mainstream common weights. That said they do seem pretty ok in use
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
So you found the accustoms less accurate? I would have thought the ballistic tips would be more accurate than a soft point.

As a general rule I have always got better results (accuracy) with conventional soft point or hollow point bullets than those with polymer noses but that's only in the loads that I use.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
just a thought on these but why do Gecco seem to make their rounds heavy for caliber, the .243 are 105 grains and the .223 I think are 58 seems very odd to stray from the mainstream common weights. That said they do seem pretty ok in use

Possibly because they use standard RWS manufactured bullets that were primarily designed for deer stalking (roe in the case of .223) and not varmint shooting?
 

KB1

Well-Known Member
As a general rule I have always got better results (accuracy) with conventional soft point or hollow point bullets than those with polymer noses but that's only in the loads that I use.

So what purpose does the polymer nose serve? Is it impact?
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Blaire polymer tips on bullets serve three main purposes-

1) Makes the bullet more aerodynamic or streamlined which is mainly beneficial for shooting at extended ranges (better ballistic coefficient). Also low in mass thereby concentrating the greater part of the mass towards the rear of the bullet making the bullet more stable in flight.

2) Can be designed to initiate bullet expansion in what can basically be a hollow point bullet (not all polymer tipped bullets are legally regarded as expanding) over a wide range of velocities acting very much like the plug in the old Dum Dum bullet.

3) Polymer is a durable material that will resist nose damage such as when subjected to heavy recoil in a magazine.

The use of polymer tips on bullets doesn’t make them any more or any less accurate than bullets of other designs. In fact many bullet manufacturers have designs that don’t use polymer tips and claim vastly superior accuracy.
 

Richard Parsons

Well-Known Member
Its the back of a bullet that makes it fly straight. Same as a plane, the rudder/tail controls direction not the nose. Blimey I feel clever tonight:norty:
 

KB1

Well-Known Member
Blaire polymer tips on bullets serve three main purposes-

1) Makes the bullet more aerodynamic or streamlined which is mainly beneficial for shooting at extended ranges (better ballistic coefficient). Also low in mass thereby concentrating the greater part of the mass towards the rear of the bullet making the bullet more stable in flight.

2) Can be designed to initiate bullet expansion in what can basically be a hollow point bullet (not all polymer tipped bullets are legally regarded as expanding) over a wide range of velocities acting very much like the plug in the old Dum Dum bullet.

3) Polymer is a durable material that will resist nose damage such as when subjected to heavy recoil in a magazine.

The use of polymer tips on bullets doesn’t make them any more or any less accurate than bullets of other designs. In fact many bullet manufacturers have designs that don’t use polymer tips and claim vastly superior accuracy.

Very useful, thanks. Re 1) so really, if you are going to shoot deer out to say, 200yards, the polymer tips are not much help?
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
So you found the accustoms less accurate? I would have thought the ballistic tips would be more accurate than a soft point.

I don't think that BT are inherently any more accurate than soft points or hollow points. I think this has been discussed before and I believe the experts (which I'm not) are of the view that the base of the bullet has more effect on accuracy than the tip. Having fired a wide variety of bullet types and weights, commercial and home loads, there is significant difference in POI and group size through my rifle. I would guess that another CZ550 owner could fire the same ammunition types and get entirely different results. The only reliable way you will find out if GECO .243 is any good for you is to fire some through your rifle and judge the results.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Very useful, thanks. Re 1) so really, if you are going to shoot deer out to say, 200yards, the polymer tips are not much help?

Without generalising too much I would say not really, it's just another way of finishing off the nose of the bullet. As Bandit says the only way to find out if they are accurate in your rifle is to shoot them. No one else can tell you if a particular round will be accurate in your rifle as every rifle is different. Often shooters are pleasantly surprised when the cheapest "nastiest" ammo performs well and are totally surprised and most upset when ammo that has cost them an arm and a leg just won't perform in their rifle.
 

KB1

Well-Known Member
Without generalising too much I would say not really, it's just another way of finishing off the nose of the bullet. As Bandit says the only way to find out if they are accurate in your rifle is to shoot them. No one else can tell you if a particular round will be accurate in your rifle as every rifle is different. Often shooters are pleasantly surprised when the cheapest "nastiest" ammo performs well and are totally surprised and most upset when ammo that has cost them an arm and a leg just won't perform in their rifle.

Makes sense. I have been trying to buy a few rounds of different ammo brands for my 243 but most suppliers seem only to sell them in bulk. Is there anywhere I can pick up multiple brands per box/20?
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
What do you call bulk? I've never come across a dealer that wouldn't sell you a box of 20 unless they have had to make a special order because they don't normally stock it and order it in. In which case there is normally a minimum order of say 200 or so from the importers, sometimes more than that. Most good dealers will have a selection of brands in the more popular calibres.

Edit.

You weren't asking about buying a mixed box of only 20 rounds were you? I've never heard of that.
 
Last edited:

KB1

Well-Known Member
What do you call bulk? I've never come across a dealer that wouldn't sell you a box of 20 unless they have had to make a special order because they don't normally stock it and order it in. In which case there is normally a minimum order of say 200 or so from the importers, sometimes more than that. Most good dealers will have a selection of brands in the more popular calibres.

Edit.

You weren't asking about buying a mixed box of only 20 rounds were you? I've never heard of that.

​No, was looking to get a few boxes of 20 rounds in different calibres. just struggled to find anyone holding 243
 

seprim

Well-Known Member
blaire
try down here in kent, chris potter sells 243 ammo, as does wilson and wilson, kent wool growers and countryways gunshop - I'd phone first to find out what they have and how many.
I am in the same boat as you I think - Im trying some Geco 105gr sp and some federal 100gr sp to see how they perform in my 243

Andrew
 

KB1

Well-Known Member
blaire
try down here in kent, chris potter sells 243 ammo, as does wilson and wilson, kent wool growers and countryways gunshop - I'd phone first to find out what they have and how many.
I am in the same boat as you I think - Im trying some Geco 105gr sp and some federal 100gr sp to see how they perform in my 243

Andrew
​thanks Andrew, will definitely give that a try. I've been told 70-90 g is best for my Remy, which is a 9.5in twist but would like to try a few different grains first
 
1967spud Reloading Supplies Ltd - UK Suppliers for Reloading Equipment supplies, We also stock Bullet Heads and Bullet Cases Guns Cabinets, Night vision and much much more...
Top