Glos Police Authority and cabinet fixings, latest advice and experience. Please read if in Glos area.

gixer1

Well-Known Member
Hope you are feeling better and happy new year.

On the cabinet thing - what a load of nonsense from the police on this one - many houses have timber frames and if you bolt to the timber frame and floor with for example a 10mm bolt is of reasonable grade material (say 110ksi) it’s going to take over 10,000lbs of force to shear that bolt!

Most people put 6 or 8 bolts in so you are not ripping it off easily!

Another case of a police force going rogue without any logic to back up the requirement!
 
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finnbear270

Well-Known Member
Hope you are feeling better and happy new year.

On the cabinet thing - what a load of nonsense from the police on this one - many houses have timber frames and if you bolt to the timber frame and floor with for example a 10mm bolt is f reasonable grade material (say 110ksi) it’s going to take over 10,000lbs of force to shear that bolt!

Most people put 6 or 8 bolts in so you are not ripping it off easily!

Another case of a police force going rogue without any logic to back up the requirement!
Fiefdoms again cooking up another cauldron of twaddle.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Another case of a police force going rogue without any logic to back up the requirement!
I'm not so sure about that.
I live in the adjoining force area and know of at least two cases where gun cabinets have been ripped off walls and taken away. In the one case it was the father-in-law of a retired senior police officer who's house was broken into and the former police officer said that according to the investigating officer who he spoke to they had experienced a run of similar incidents in rural and semi-rural areas.
 

gixer1

Well-Known Member
I'm not so sure about that.
I live in the adjoining force area and know of at least two cases where gun cabinets have been ripped off walls and taken away. In the one case it was the father-in-law of a retired senior police officer who's house was broken into and the former police officer said that according to the investigating officer who he spoke to they had experienced a run of similar incidents in rural and semi-rural areas.
It’s still without logic if they thing an M12 bolt is going to make the difference over an M10 bolt.

The problem is not what they are fixed with in most cases but how they are fixed.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I agree with you on that, the difference between using a M10 as opposed to a M12 is negligible in this case.
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
So wot do the vast majority of folk do that live in a more modern built kit house with no masonry walls??

I'm just renovating 1 for myself and we ended up ripping the wall down i intended on fixing my cabinet too, but even if i didn't u would probably have had a 6" void just to reach the face on the masonry from the plasterboard.
ON many houses the only masonry wall will be external so if u fix to tha ur creating a possible point for damp to breech the cavity

That takes a bit of doing fixing a expansion bolt into that for the average diyer.

I'm hoping mine will pass when the time comes but just filling the void th the stud partion up with timber dwangs so will be wood screws holding it.

Would coach bolts be a better bet?? ( Not sure that is the correct term. The big dia rough threaded bolts u pre drill and bolt in like u get on eleccy poles etc)
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Coach bolts can be very effective at securing a cabinet, especially if fixed down to floor joists.
I guessed you were referring to noggins when you said Dwang and that it was possibly a Scottish term. That's it my new word for the day. :thumb:
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Coach bolts can be very effective at securing a cabinet, especially if fixed down to floor joists.
I guessed you were referring to noggins when you said Dwang and that it was possibly a Scottish term. That's it my new word for the day. :thumb:

Dunno never heard of noggins either :lol:

I think my last 3 cabint positions have only been held on by normal 4" screws on to timber, but all well solid

But most likely the bits of timber/floorboard u put behind the plaster board to attach kitchen units etc too
 

Lever357

Well-Known Member
2 cabinets, a 6 gun and a 10 gun, in my village were taken in 2 separate events in the same week, the persons involved turning up in 2 vans, 1 was driven into the side of the house to smash the safe from the wall and the other was used to take it away.
Do not believe firearms are safe due to your safe location, look at how cashpoints are stolen!!!!
Remove the safe and deal with it later!!! Took less than 5 minutes and a police response is 10 minutes if called simultaneously !!!!
Surely they must have had knowledge of where the safes were to do that???
 

ChesterP

Well-Known Member
That's the thing. I suspect the relatively few cases there are, are down to prior knowledge which is why it's important not to advertise the fact of what you have nor where you keep your safes. I wonder how many cases are down to loose tongues or social media?
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
So wot do the vast majority of folk do that live in a more modern built kit house with no masonry walls??

I'm just renovating 1 for myself and we ended up ripping the wall down i intended on fixing my cabinet too, but even if i didn't u would probably have had a 6" void just to reach the face on the masonry from the plasterboard.
ON many houses the only masonry wall will be external so if u fix to tha ur creating a possible point for damp to breech the cavity

That takes a bit of doing fixing a expansion bolt into that for the average diyer.

I'm hoping mine will pass when the time comes but just filling the void th the stud partion up with timber dwangs so will be wood screws holding it.

Would coach bolts be a better bet?? ( Not sure that is the correct term. The big dia rough threaded bolts u pre drill and bolt in like u get on eleccy poles etc)
How about secreting it under the floor (Ground or Basement Level!) in what I can only describe as a poured concrete coffin that extends beyond all sides of the cabinet by at least 1m?

Drill three 20mm holes in the top, bottom and both sides of cabinet and secure 300mm peices of threaded rod with an inner & outer nut to the cabinet. The protruding rod will act like reinforcing bar when you pour the concrete.

Just a suggestion and remember to choose your location wisely and run a 240v supply to the cabinet to permit powering a small low powered heater to keep out any damp.

K
 

TH4

Well-Known Member
2 cabinets, a 6 gun and a 10 gun, in my village were taken in 2 separate events in the same week, the persons involved turning up in 2 vans, 1 was driven into the side of the house to smash the safe from the wall and the other was used to take it away.
Do not believe firearms are safe due to your safe location, look at how cashpoints are stolen!!!!
Remove the safe and deal with it later!!! Took less than 5 minutes and a police response is 10 minutes if called simultaneously !!!!
Bit hard if it's an upstairs wall.
 

Franchi Matt

Well-Known Member
2 vans, 1 was driven into the side of the house to smash the safe from the wall and the other was used to take it away.
Gotta ask yourself- how did they know what wall the cabinet was on? Surely the police would off been all over that aspect of the theft.
 

Whitefront

Well-Known Member
The UK standard for gun cabinets, BS 7558, is pretty low; certainly, lower than the German equivalent. Even so, any power grinder will get through a few mm of steel very rapidly. Gun cabinets are not safes, in the strict sense.

Cannot see the point of an intruder alarm in a rural area; who would hear it? And even if they did, what are they going to do about it? The police won't get there until long after the break-in, as the intruders will know.

Good concealment of the cabinet, on the other hand, really is useful.
 

Leupsak

Well-Known Member
Gotta ask yourself- how did they know what wall the cabinet was on? Surely the police would off been all over that aspect of the theft.
They broke in first then ram raided the house, knew he had guns as he was a keeper

My advice would be to take care bringing guns into the house and who sees you, also don’t leave stuff in your vehicle that could identify you as a shooter and definitely don’t display a shooting association sticker. I also have large safes and bolted them together as well as to the wall for a total weight of 108kg empty

Burglar alarm, cctv etc are all fitted but you need to be smart and consider yourself a potential target.
 
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uptonogood

Well-Known Member
To the Op .Drilling into the cavity isn’t necessary at all .Mark the drill with a piece of tape at 3 inches deep .The chem fill we use uses a standard gun .Fill the hole up after de dusting and wind the bar in .This uses all the chem in the hole rather than pushing in whereby the majority will spill out .The standard of 12 mm is just what it is ,overkill but at least it’s a standard and not a guess .On all my cabinets ,I’ve cut the skirting board so the cabinet is also fixed to the flooring .Alarms are very easy to install ,any cheap shed alarm will suffice .
 
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