Gunsmith recommendation & is bedding a Sako 85 worth it?

KentCountryGent

Well-Known Member
Hi all,
I'm thinking of having my Sako 85 properly bedded - anyone had any experience having this done? Worth the outlay?
If so, can anyone recommend a good gunsmith to do this in the south east?

Many thanks,
KCG
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
That depends.
Is the current standard of accuracy with factory or hand loads?
Have you stripped the rifle down and rebuilt it with each part properly torqued?
The latter is probably one reason why so many Bedding jobs work wonders. The rifle wasn’t tightened up in its stock properly in the first place. Not my words but those of a ‘Smith who’s opinion I respect.
Once you have ruled out the other possible reasons, then it might be worth getting done. But done correctly it is not a cheap solution and it might not gain you more than a change of ammunition might for example.
 

KentCountryGent

Well-Known Member
That depends.
Is the current standard of accuracy with factory or hand loads?
Have you stripped the rifle down and rebuilt it with each part properly torqued?
The latter is probably one reason why so many Bedding jobs work wonders. The rifle wasn’t tightened up in its stock properly in the first place. Not my words but those of a ‘Smith who’s opinion I respect.
Once you have ruled out the other possible reasons, then it might be worth getting done. But done correctly it is not a cheap solution and it might not gain you more than a change of ammunition might for example.
Thanks for the input - yes all disassembled, checked, action seated and torqued properly. Just looking to get a bit more out of it at range 👍
 

KentCountryGent

Well-Known Member
That depends.
Is the current standard of accuracy with factory or hand loads?
Have you stripped the rifle down and rebuilt it with each part properly torqued?
The latter is probably one reason why so many Bedding jobs work wonders. The rifle wasn’t tightened up in its stock properly in the first place. Not my words but those of a ‘Smith who’s opinion I respect.
Once you have ruled out the other possible reasons, then it might be worth getting done. But done correctly it is not a cheap solution and it might not gain you more than a change of ammunition might for example.
Also, the action comes loose in the stock through the course of a range session ( or 40 rounds or so) frustrating but a problem I've heard others with laminate stocked 85s report
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Also, the action comes loose in the stock through the course of a range session ( or 40 rounds or so) frustrating but a problem I've heard others with laminate stocked 85s report
That's not ideal, eh, KCG...

Are you using a torque wrench or just going by feel on the action screws? Are the screws too greasy or oily (can give false torque readings)?

Worth adding a dab of (weak/medium) Loctite. Also, as @caberslash says, the factory bedding arrangement is...ahem...eccentric, and benefits from a Tikka lug and/or proper bedding by a gunsmith. I had mine done by Dave at Valkyrie Rifles (into a McMillan rather than factory stock) and it shoots nicely (even though I am no marksman).

Best,

Carl
 

KentCountryGent

Well-Known Member
That's not ideal, eh, KCG...

Are you using a torque wrench or just going by feel on the action screws? Are the screws too greasy or oily (can give false torque readings)?

Worth adding a dab of (weak/medium) Loctite. Also, as @caberslash says, the factory bedding arrangement is...ahem...eccentric, and benefits from a Tikka lug and/or proper bedding by a gunsmith. I had mine done by Dave at Valkyrie Rifles (into a McMillan rather than factory stock) and it shoots nicely (even though I am no marksman).

Best,

Carl
Thanks Carl - yes I use a torque wrench on all my guns and the threads are very lightly greased, if at all. I recall seeing a thread on here where another chap mentioned the same thing with his 85.

The rifle is in very good condition and the stock hasn't gone soft anywhere as far as I can tell. Perhaps loctite would do the job as you say. Wish I could find a McMillan or something synthetic that didn't cost the earth.
Thanks again,
Rick
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Caberslash, how does one go about fitting a tikka lug?

I'd ask @Ronin for a professional opinion, but as far as I'd approach it, I'd get another stock (McMillan are probably one of the few major aftermarket inlet options available) and have that full length bedded with pillars and the Tikka recoil lug (steel, not aluminum as the early Tikka T3's came with). Start from scratch!

You could modify the factory Sako 85 stock, but when (not if) the time comes to sell it, a potential buyer could use this as leverage to push the price down, or if you did have an unrelated problem then the retailer would try and blame such a modification even if the cause was totally unrelated.

Personally, I'd sell the 85 and buy a Howa or Remington Model 7 if you are using a short action round or a Tikka T3x if you are using a long action round, for a magnum I'd buy a Remington 700 LA.

Might not be what you wanted to hear, but the above actions are better thought out and in many ways simplicity is best, the 85 is quite complicated with a 3-lug bolt and pseudo controlled round feed, the 'idiot-proof' magazine release also bugs me (and I have been called an idiot many times :rofl: ).
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Caberslash, how does one go about fitting a tikka lug?

To be frank, you'd need to to a proper full length job to get it done properly. By this I literally mean removing material from the current inlet and having pillars installed, bedding both the action and bottom metal/triggerguard and ensuring the barrel and action are properly centred in the stock. As said above, this is a pretty 'destructive' modification in the eyes of any manufacturer so you are better off getting another stock to do this.

By the time you have bought another stock and maybe paid a competent person to do the above if you don't feel up to it, you could have bought a secondhand Howa or Remington.
 

dasherman

Well-Known Member
You don’t need a new stock, just pillars fitted and the action bedded correctly. Spend around £400 with someone who knows what he’s doing and you’ll have a stock that fits like a glove, has correct steel to steel contact between the floorplate and the action and you can tighten the screws properly and they will not shake themselves loose. It may not put £400 onto the value of your 85 but you will end up with a rifle that shoots consistently. Ask whoever you get to do it to show you some (not pictures) of their work, I see many stocks with very poor bedding jobs that people bring in with barrels not in the middle of barrel channels, air pockets, pillars not machined to the angle of the floorplate and generally hacked about by the dremill fraternity instead of machined correctly on a milling machine.
 

KentCountryGent

Well-Known Member
You don’t need a new stock, just pillars fitted and the action bedded correctly. Spend around £400 with someone who knows what he’s doing and you’ll have a stock that fits like a glove, has correct steel to steel contact between the floorplate and the action and you can tighten the screws properly and they will not shake themselves loose. It may not put £400 onto the value of your 85 but you will end up with a rifle that shoots consistently. Ask whoever you get to do it to show you some (not pictures) of their work, I see many stocks with very poor bedding jobs that people bring in with barrels not in the middle of barrel channels, air pockets, pillars not machined to the angle of the floorplate and generally hacked about by the dremill fraternity instead of machined correctly on a milling machine.
Thanks Dasherman! 👍
 

DavyG

Well-Known Member
To be frank, you'd need to to a proper full length job to get it done properly. By this I literally mean removing material from the current inlet and having pillars installed, bedding both the action and bottom metal/triggerguard and ensuring the barrel and action are properly centred in the stock. As said above, this is a pretty 'destructive' modification in the eyes of any manufacturer so you are better off getting another stock to do this.

By the time you have bought another stock and maybe paid a competent person to do the above if you don't feel up to it, you could have bought a secondhand Howa or Remington.
These new-fangled “modern” 85’s aint half the rifle a 75 was. You think Sako would have cottoned on to this by now. ( They’ve been churning them out since 2006).
I must have the only one that shoots sub moa. (Clover leaf groups when I’m in the mood).
So...buy a Howa or a Remmy, you’ll love them.
Regards,
DG
 
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