Haenel jaeger 9 single shot.

moray loon

Well-Known Member
This is a long shot, but..... does anyone out there have knowledge of the above rifle ? I am still looking for a lightweight rifle, probably in single shot format with a take - down capability, and this seems to fit the bill. They are ( or certainly can be ) imported by Viking Arms. All info greatly received, moray loon.
 

Goingback

Well-Known Member
Another single shot rifle that is distributed over here is the Apex - bergararifles.com .They look good and are distributed by RUAG in the UK.
 

Chirug

Member
Haenel Jaeger 9

This is a long shot, but..... does anyone out there have knowledge of the above rifle ? I am still looking for a lightweight rifle, probably in single shot format with a take - down capability, and this seems to fit the bill. They are ( or certainly can be ) imported by Viking Arms. All info greatly received, moray loon.

I've got this rifle in 7x65r. I've had it for about 8 months now and, truthfully, it is a very basic rifle. Basic but very clean walnut, plain graphite colored sideplates, and no embellishment at all. I bought it because I was impressed with the simplicity, light weight, and elegance of a single shot stalking rifle but didn't want to sell a kidney for a Blaser or Merkel. What attracted me to the Jaeger 9 is that Haenel is owned/made by Merkel. Therefore, I knew I would be getting a quality firearm. Also, I wanted a good all-around caliber and the 7x65r is about the best caliber you can get without getting into uncomfortable recoil from a very light rifle. It'll handle bullets from 120 grains up to 175 grains. Also, the QD scope mount by Recknagle is absolutely a feat of genius. It is a bit heavy but it mounts and dismounts with a little lever and is perfect to return to 0 every time. The whole gun breaks down and reassembles in about 20 seconds without tools. It is 7.25 pounds with sling and shell in chamber. Frankly, I love it.

But, the proof is in the pudding, right? I purchased RWS Dopplekern, Evo, and ID Classic (10.5 grams) to try. All were 1-1.25 inch or less for groupings at 100 meters but the Doppelkern consistently shot 5/8inch for 3 shots if I allowed the barrel to cool a bit between shots. Wow. So, accurate too. I managed to stalk and take 3 nice Rehbocks this summer with the rifle and Doppelkerns (great bullets by the way). I have fallen in love with it. My only complaints are these: 1) After the first 4 shots (in which I was at bullseye already), the cocking lever somehow failed to catch and cock the gun. I could not get it to catch and cock and I did not want to take the gun apart so back it went to Haenel. It was back to me within 2 weeks good as new and free of charge, of course. I can only imagine that the mechanism wasn't properly adjusted at the factory but who really knows. 2) The wooden takedown stockpiece (forend) is a bit loose when attached to the gun and "rattles" ever so slightly. I wish the fit was a bit tighter and more exact but this is a small complaint 3) the front end sling swivel is attached to the wooden takedown stock forend. I do not think this is the strongest method to carry this particular firearm with so I will be having my gunsmith attach a proper barrel mounted sling swivel as soon as the season is over. This was obviously a cost cutting move on Haenel's part and is the only inexcusible fault with the gun, in my opinion.

In short, this sweet little single shot is graceful, deft, svelte, easy to point, and deadly accurate with my choice of ammo. Recoil is not bad at all and as far as a stalking and mountain rifle that can take anything from fox to Red Stags and even bears or moose - this gun is it. All for about 1350 Euros including the QD mount from Recknagle. I'm quite pleased with the whole setup and will be taking the rifle on my Chamois hunt this weekend. Let me know if I can be of any other help.

Chirug
 

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Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Try the accuratereloading.com and nitroexpress.com - they both have dedicated single shot forums. Can't speak for the Haenel, other than it looks a nice rifle from the pictures but agree with Chirug's comments on the 7x65R. Dont be put off by the fact that its a single shot - you can reload more than quickly enough for a 2nd shot if needs be. Do though get a set of ear plugs so as to blank out the noise of the Tacticool brigade with 15lb bipodded, heavy barrel, massive modded and 20 shot mags who will deride you for the choice of rifle.
 
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moray loon

Well-Known Member
Dear Chirug, thank you very much for your comments. I really appreciate you taking the time to give me so much information. I am thinking of buying one of these rifles in .243 Winchester, although I am tempted by the 7 x 65 R as I know a RFD who has 300 + rounds in stock. Thanks to Heym SR20 as well. Your friendly and informative replies are what this forum should be all about. Best regards, moray loon.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
If you are going for a single shot seriously think about a rimmed cartridge. I have No arguments with the 243, but it's a bolt action cartridge. With a break action, a rimless cartridge requires a funny little clip on the extractor to engage with the rim and that lefts the cartridge up. You then have to grab hold of it and pull it out - like you have to do with a non ejector shotgun. With the Heanel you have that top extension and the scope which will make this bit more fiddly.

With a rimmed cartridge - fire, open the action, turn the barrel upwards and the empty case just falls out. I have both the 243 and the 7x65r and since getting the later the 243 doesn't come out that often. With a hand loaded 139gn at 2650 fps it's a mild recoiling round, but you can use a 173gn bullet at 2800 fps if you want / need a big thump.

If I was wanting a smaller cartridge I would also look at the 6.5x57R.

Now who is that RFD with 300 rounds in stock??? That's the one downside of the 7x65r, you can't get it everywhere.
 
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moray loon

Well-Known Member
Dear Heym, I hear what you say about the rimmed/rimless issue, but it may be a slight "fiddly" problem worth putting up with, as .243 W is so easy to source, and I am not a reloader. The 6.5 x 57R does interest me, but again, it is a rare calibre in this country. Sloans of Inverurie 01467 625181 has the 7 X 65 R ammo in stock. All the best and thanks again for your attention to detail and excellent replies, moray loon.
 

Chirug

Member
If you are going for a single shot seriously think about a rimmed cartridge. I have No arguments with the 243, but it's a bolt action cartridge. With a break action, a rimless cartridge requires a funny little clip on the extractor to engage with the rim and that lefts the cartridge up. You then have to grab hold of it and pull it out - like you have to do with a non ejector shotgun. With the Heanel you have that top extension and the scope which will make this bit more fiddly.

With a rimmed cartridge - fire, open the action, turn the barrel upwards and the empty case just falls out. I have both the 243 and the 7x65r and since getting the later the 243 doesn't come out that often. With a hand loaded 139gn at 2650 fps it's a mild recoiling round, but you can use a 173gn bullet at 2800 fps if you want / need a big thump.

If I was wanting a smaller cartridge I would also look at the 6.5x57R.

Now who is that RFD with 300 rounds in stock??? That's the one downside of the 7x65r, you can't get it everywhere.

I was just reviewing the Haenel website and they do not have .243 listed as an available caliber choice. Moray, maybe you have access to this caliber in the UK with the Haenel? The only rimless cartridges that I see are 30-06, .308, .270, 300 win, and 7mm Mag. I would, myself, only consider the .308 or .270 and possibly the 30-06 in a single shot as the magnums are pretty brutal from the recoil standpoint...

Another rimmed caliber to consider for your tasks is the 7x57r. This is the rimmed version of the classic "do everything" cartridge that will take everything from foxes to medium range Reds and other larger deer. It is a very effective and very mild cartridge for a break barrel rifle. The 6.5x57r was mentioned as well, but it is much more difficult to find, as a rule.

I do not have any experience, admittedly, with non-rimmed cartridges in single shot guns. I do have some friends who have them and, while not as easy to extract, do not complain about it as being a big issue. .243 (if you can get it) certainly is everywhere and cheap to boot. Good luck with your decision.
Chirug
 
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6pt-sika

Well-Known Member
Another rimmed caliber to consider for your tasks is the 7x57r. This is the rimmed version of the classic "do everything" cartridge that will take everything from foxes to medium range Reds and other larger deer. It is a very effective and very mild cartridge for a break barrel rifle. The 6.5x57r was mentioned as well, but it is much more difficult to find, as a rule.

I have a pair of drillings and a combo gun all that have the rifle barrels chambered for the 7x57R , sad part to the story I only have 17 pieces of RWS 7x57R brass to keep all three running !

I have however seen the S&B sells loaded ammo for the 7x57R so I've been thinking of getting a couple boxes of that just for the brass . Of course I can get Norma brass for the 7x57R but that stuff is like gold here in the good old US of A !

As to the 6.5x57R I wish one of my drillings was chambered for that cartridge . I have a friend with a 6.5 Arisaka thats been rechambered to 6.5-257 Roberts which for all intents and purposes is the same as the non rimmed version of the 6.5x57 .
 
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Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Dear Heym, I hear what you say about the rimmed/rimless issue, but it may be a slight "fiddly" problem worth putting up with, as .243 W is so easy to source, and I am not a reloader. The 6.5 x 57R does interest me, but again, it is a rare calibre in this country. Sloans of Inverurie 01467 625181 has the 7 X 65 R ammo in stock. All the best and thanks again for your attention to detail and excellent replies, moray loon.

Thanks for the heads up re Sloans - good to know. And totally agree with you point re .243 or other commonly available ammo. Thinking about it I happily pull the empties out of my 410 side by side and given there is a bit of pitting in the chambers cases tend to stick - usually when there is a good flush of pheasants coming my way and everybody is watching! So much so that I keep a leather man with pliers in my pocket just for this eventuality.

Also quite a bit of chat on the other forums about the Luxus Single shot. Looks a nice rifle but as nice as German built and haven't a clue whether they are available here. Short video clip on their hompage shows how quickly they can reload - and this in a 7-08. Luxus Arms LLC
 

Chirug

Member
Thanks for the heads up re Sloans - good to know. And totally agree with you point re .243 or other commonly available ammo. Thinking about it I happily pull the empties out of my 410 side by side and given there is a bit of pitting in the chambers cases tend to stick - usually when there is a good flush of pheasants coming my way and everybody is watching! So much so that I keep a leather man with pliers in my pocket just for this eventuality.

Also quite a bit of chat on the other forums about the Luxus Single shot. Looks a nice rifle but as nice as German built and haven't a clue whether they are available here. Short video clip on their hompage shows how quickly they can reload - and this in a 7-08.

Uh, wow...those Luxus singles are stunning. Very unique action as well. If I could get ahold of one of these in Germany....I had never even heard of them. Buy one now because the cost of premium Turkish walnut is slowing creeping up...Those same stocks on a Blaser are double or triple what Luxus is getting for their entire gun!
 

moray loon

Well-Known Member
I was just reviewing the Haenel website and they do not have .243 listed as an available caliber choice. Moray, maybe you have access to this caliber in the UK with the Haenel? The only rimless cartridges that I see are 30-06, .308, .270, 300 win, and 7mm Mag. I would, myself, only consider the .308 or .270 and possibly the 30-06 in a single shot as the magnums are pretty brutal from the recoil standpoint...

Another rimmed caliber to consider for your tasks is the 7x57r. This is the rimmed version of the classic "do everything" cartridge that will take everything from foxes to medium range Reds and other larger deer. It is a very effective and very mild cartridge for a break barrel rifle. The 6.5x57r was mentioned as well, but it is much more difficult to find, as a rule.

I do not have any experience, admittedly, with non-rimmed cartridges in single shot guns. I do have some friends who have them and, while not as easy to extract, do not complain about it as being a big issue. .243 (if you can get it) certainly is everywhere and cheap to boot. Good luck with your decision.
Chirug
The importers for the UK are Viking Arms, the Haenel catalogue they have on their website does show .243 as an option, but who knows, it may be out of date ? Thanks again to you and Heym. Regards ml
 
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Chirug

Member
The importers for the UK are Viking Arms, the Haenel catalogue they have on their website does show .243 as an option, but who knows, it may be out of date ? Thanks again to you and Heym. Regards ml

Morey -

As promised. Let me know if you have any other questions. Short of flying to the UK to let you shoot my rifle, I'd be happy to help in any way.

Chirug
 

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moray loon

Well-Known Member
I have pm'd you, but once again, I am delighted for you. Only when one has hunted these amazing animals in the mountains does the French chasseurs saying " any chamois is a trophy" make sense. You must be so happy to have taken such an old, excellent trophy ! His horns are truly those of an old warrior.Thanks for all the information re the rifle etc. ATB moray loon.
 

Chirug

Member
Heym-

Thank you kindly. It was a great hunt. The kipplauf was very welcome with its lightness and precision. If you do get the chance to go after one of these, take the chance as it is a grand experience. Thanks also for the link. WMT.

Chirug
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
I like Kipplaufs, I like the ethos of respect for the quarry that go with them, but my God, those chaps in the article sound like obnoxious snobs! Now it's not entirely unexpected for a prince and a count to be a bit snobbish, but their disdain for industrial production, nouveau-riche Russians and their excessive engraving, people who don't have the time and ressources to dedicate three nights a week for a year to a hunting exam and so on is just pretty staggering. Well actually, what it is, is feudal. A big chunk of their view of hunting is that it's something to be kept exclusive for people like them.

Nevertheless, nice rifles!
 

Chirug

Member
I like Kipplaufs, I like the ethos of respect for the quarry that go with them, but my God, those chaps in the article sound like obnoxious snobs! Now it's not entirely unexpected for a prince and a count to be a bit snobbish, but their disdain for industrial production, nouveau-riche Russians and their excessive engraving, people who don't have the time and ressources to dedicate three nights a week for a year to a hunting exam and so on is just pretty staggering. Well actually, what it is, is feudal. A big chunk of their view of hunting is that it's something to be kept exclusive for people like them.

Nevertheless, nice rifles!

Pine-

Agreed. My Haenel kipplauf is certainly no custom rig and is most definitely a "production rifle." What you have to ask yourself is this....Do I want a precision instrument, a tool to use while I pursue my quarry that is functional and precise? One which tests me as a hunter by requiring that I get close enough and surgically place one paramount bullet....Or.... Do I want a status symbol that does the same thing? Don't get me wrong...I would love a Blaser, Krieghoff, or Merkel custom kipplauf but for me, for the way I hunt and for the reason I hunt my Haenel is exactly what I need. Nothing terribly fancy but it can put three 154 gr bullets in a quid at 100 meters. A "paupers kipplauf." (Although some would argue that any kipplauf in general is an elitist rifle...whatever).

For the "snobbish" hunters that use only the 50,000 pound/Euro/dollar rifles (and I've discovered that, amazingly, there are a lot of them) - that is their thing. What I've noticed in Europe more than in other places that I've hunted is that hunting here is absolutely more laden with "status" than seems necessary. However, when one considers how expensive it is in the first place to hunt here, well, I suppose it will attract a few barons, princes, and "snobs." !!! Weidmannsheil.

Chirug
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I live in Edinburgh. I have both the 243 and 7x65r so I can see the merits of both. 243 flat shooting and a high velocity / high intensity type cartridge. Perfectly adequate for most deer and wonderful in a lightweight rifle. 7x65r is a lower pressure round and using bullet weight rather than velocity. Possibly the more versatile in that it would be good for boar, big stags as well as dainty Roe deer. It's rimmed so ideal for a Kipplauf.

In terms of killing power heart / lung shot on roe or Red, with the 243 they immediately go into a headlong rush for 20 to 40 yds and then pile up dead. The 7x65r knocks them off their feet and they then kick for several seconds. Both are very accurate. Which do I use most - 6 of one and two threes. If I am going to be prone shooting then take the 243 - it's a bolt with a straight stock, whereas the 7x65r is more comfortable off sticks - has more drop in the stock and 6x42 scope. But the latter as it breaks down is a great travelling gun.
 
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